Diana: Wikis

  
  
  

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Diana may refer to:

In music:

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In geography:

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DIANA may refer to:

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  • Diane
  • All pages beginning with "Diana"

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

DIANA, in Roman mythology, an old Italian goddess, in later times identified with the Greek Artemis. That she was originally an independent Italian deity is shown by her name, which is the feminine form of Janus (= Dianus). She is essentially the goddess of the moon and light generally, and presides over wood, plain and water, the chase and war. As the goddess of childbirth, she was known, like Juno, by the name of Lucina, the "bringer to light." As the moon-goddess she was also identified with Hecate, and invoked as "three-formed" in reference to the phases of the moon. Her most celebrated shrine was in a grove at Aricia (whence her title of Nemorensis) near the modern lake of Nemi. Here she was worshipped side by side with a male deity Virbius, a god of the forest and the chase. This Virbius was subsequently identified with Hippolytus, the favourite of Artemis, who was said to have been brought to life by Aesculapius and conducted by Diana to Aricia (Ovid, Fasti, iii. 263, vi. 731, tl7etam. xv. 497; Virgil, Aeneid, vii. 761). A barbarous custom, perhaps reminiscent of human sacrifice once offered to her, prevailed in connexion with her ritual here; her priest, called Rex Nemorensis, who was a runaway slave, was obliged to qualify for office by slaying his predecessor in single combat (Strabo v. p. 2 39; Suetonius, Caligula, 35). This led to the identification of Diana with the Tauric Artemis, whose image was said to have been removed by Orestes to the grove of Aricia (see Aricini) .

After the destruction of Alba Longa this grove was for a long time the united sanctuary of the neighbouring Latin and Rutulian cities, until at last it was extinguished beneath the supremacy of Rome. The festival of the goddess was on the ides (13th) of August, the full moon of the hot season. She was worshipped with torches, her aid was sought by women seeking a happy deliverance in childbirth, and many votive offerings have been found on the site. The worship of Diana was brought to Rome by Latin plebeians, and hence she was regarded as the protectress of the lower classes, and especially of slaves. In accordance with this, her most important temple was that on the Aventine, the chief seat of the plebeians, founded by Servius Tullius, originally as a sanctuary of the Latin league (Dion. HaIic. iv. 26). No man was allowed to enter the temple, and on the day of its dedication (August 13) the slaves kept holiday (Plutarch, Quaest. Rom. loo). This Diana was identified with the sister of Apollo, and at the secular games she was worshipped simply as Artemis. Another celebrated sanctuary of Diana was that on the slopes of Mount Tifata near Capua (where she was worshipped under the name of Tifatina), a sanctuary specially favoured by Sulla and Vespasian. As Noctiluca ("giving light by night") she had a sanctuary on the Palatine which was kept illuminated throughout the night (Varro, L.L. v. 68). On the Nemi priesthood see J. ,G. Frazer, Golden Bough.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

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English

Diana (1)

Alternative spellings

Etymology

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Pronunciation

Proper noun

Singular
Diana

Plural
-

Diana

  1. (Roman mythology) The daughter of Latona and Jupiter, and twin sister of Apollo. The virgin moon goddess of the hunt, associated wild animals and the forest or wilderness, and an emblem of chastity.
  2. A female given name.
    • 1605 William Camden, Remains Concerning Britain, John Russell Smith, 1870, page 56:
      But succeeding ages (little regarding S. Chrysosthome's admonition to the contrary) have recalled prophane names, so as now Diana, Cassandra, Hyppolytus, Venus, Lais, names of unhappy disaster are as rife, as ever they were in paganism.
    • 1993 James Kirkup, Queens Have Died Young and Fair, P. Owen, ISBN 0720608864, page 94:
      A wholesome British name like Diana, Anne, Margaret or Elizabeth impresses a judge much more than all your vulgar Marilyns, Donnas, Madonnas and Dawns.

Related terms

Translations

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Anagrams


Czech

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Diana

Wikipedia cs

Proper noun

Diana f.

  1. A female given name, cognate to Diana.

Danish

Proper noun

Diana

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. A female given name.

Estonian

Proper noun

Diana

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. A female given name.

German

Proper noun

Diana

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. A female given name.

Italian

Proper noun

Diana f.

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. A female given name.

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of aadin
  • andai

Spanish

Proper noun

Diana f.

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. A female given name.

Swedish

Proper noun

Diana

  1. (Roman mythology) Diana
  2. A female given name.

Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

so called by the Romans; called Artemis by the Greeks, the "great" goddess worshipped among heathen nations under various modifications. Her most noted temple was that at Ephesus. It was built outside the city walls, and was one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. "First and last it was the work of 220 years; built of shining marble; 342 feet long by 164 feet broad; supported by a forest of columns, each 56 feet high; a sacred museum of masterpieces of sculpture and painting. At the centre, hidden by curtains, within a gorgeous shrine, stood the very ancient image of the goddess, on wood or ebony reputed to have fallen from the sky. Behind the shrine was a treasury, where, as in 'the safest bank in Asia,' nations and kings stored their most precious things. The temple as St. Paul saw it subsisted till A.D. 262, when it was ruined by the Goths" (Acts 19:23-41)., Moule on Ephesians: Introd.

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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