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Diego Martínez Barrio: Wikis

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Diego Martínez y Barrio (25 November 1883, Seville – 1 January 1962, Paris) was a Spanish politician during the Second Spanish Republic, Prime Minister of Spain between 9 October 1933 and 26 December 1933[1] and was briefly appointed again by Manuel Azaña after the resignation of Santiago Casares Quiroga, on July 19, 1936 - three days after the beginning of the Spanish Civil War. From March 16, 1936 to March 30, 1939 Martínez was President of the Cortes. In 1936, he briefly was interim President of the Second Spanish Republic from 7 April to 10 of May.

A member of the Radical Republican Party, he was the Minister in the Alejandro Lerroux government, although later he left the party due to his dissatisfaction with the politics of Lerroux.

Martínez consequently founded and led the Republican Union Party and participated in the Spanish Popular Front, being elected to government in 1936. He led the integration of the Republican Union Party into the Popular Front, being elected the speaker of the Cortes (Spanish Parliament). He fled the country after Francisco Franco came to power in 1939.

He was the Grand Master of the Grande Oriente Español from 1929 to 1934.[2]

After the fall of the Republic he went into exile, first to France and then to Mexico where in 1945 he was designated president of the Republic in exile until 1962. Martínez finally returned to Paris.

In 2000, his remains were moved to Seville.

References

  1. ^ http://www.geneall.net/H/per_page.php?id=467700
  2. ^ 1863-1923, Brief History of the Spanish Masonry
Preceded by
Niceto Alcalá Zamora
President of the Second Spanish Republic
(acting)

1936
Succeeded by
Manuel Azaña Díaz

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