Dinosaur size: Wikis

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Size has been one of the most interesting aspects of dinosaur science to the general public. This article lists the largest and smallest dinosaurs from various groups, sorted in order of weight and length.

Scale diagram comparing a human and the largest known dinosaurs of the four suborders.

Note: this list excludes unpublished material. In some cases, dinosaurs are known that will be included on this list if/when they are officially described. In addition, weight estimates for dinosaurs are much more variable than length estimates, because estimating length for extinct animals is much more easily done from a skeleton than estimating weight.

Contents

General records

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Heaviest dinosaurs

See also Most massive sauropods The ten largest known dinosaurs by weight, based on published weight estimates.

  1. Amphicoelias: 122.4 t[1]
  2. Argentinosaurus: 73-88 t[2][3]
  3. Futalognkosaurus: (comparable to Argentinosaurus and Puertasaurus)[4]
  4. Puertasaurus: (comparable to Argentinosaurus)[5]
  5. Antarctosaurus: 69 t[3]
  6. Paralititan: 59 t[2]
  7. Sauroposeidon: 50-60 t[6][7]
  8. Turiasaurus: 40-48 t[8]
  9. Supersaurus: 35-40 t[9]
  10. Diplodocus: 16-38 t[1][3]

Longest dinosaurs

See also Longest sauropods The ten longest known dinosaurs, based on published length estimates.

  1. Amphicoelias: 40-?60 m (131–198 ft)[1]
  2. Supersaurus: 33 to 34 m (108 to 112 ft)[9]
  3. Futalognkosaurus: 32–34 m (105–112 ft)[4]
  4. Sauroposeidon: 28–34 m (92–112 ft)[1][6][7]
  5. Diplodocus: 25.6–33.5 m (84–110 ft)[1][3]
  6. Argentinosaurus: 30 m (98 ft)[1]
  7. Puertasaurus: (comparable to Argentinosaurus)[5]
  8. Hudiesaurus: 30 m (98 ft)[10]
  9. Turiasaurus: >30 m (98 ft)[8]
  10. Barosaurus: 26 m (85 ft)[11]

Lightest dinosaurs

The ten smallest known non-avian dinosaurs by weight, based on published length estimates.

  1. Mei: <70 g[12]
  2. Anchiornis: 110 g[13]
  3. Epidexipteryx: 164 g[14]
  4. Compsognathus: 0.26 kg-3.5 kg[11][12]
  5. Juravenator: 0.34 kg[12]
  6. Fruitadens: 0.50 kg-0.75 kg[15]
  7. Sinosauropteryx: 0.55 kg[12]
  8. Microraptor: ~1 kg[16]

Shortest dinosaurs

The ten shortest known non-avian dinosaurs, based on published length estimates.

  1. Epidexipteryx: 25 cm (9.8 in)[14]
  2. Anchiornis: 34 cm (1.12 ft)[13]
  3. Mei: 53 cm (1.74 ft)[12]
  4. Jinfengopteryx: 55 cm (1.80 ft)[17]
  5. Echinodon: 60 cm (2.0 ft)[18]
  6. Graciliceratops: 60 cm (2.0 ft)[18]
  7. Shuvuuia: 60 cm (2.0 ft)[18]
  8. Wannanosaurus: 60 cm (2.0 ft)[18]
  9. Gasparinisaura: 65 cm (2.13 ft)[18]
  10. Fruitadens: 65–75 cm (2.13–2.46 ft)[15]

Theropods

Sizes are given with a range, where possible, of estimates that have not been contradicted by more recent studies. In cases where a range of currently accepted estimates exist, sources are given for the sources with the lowest and highest estimates, respectively, and only the highest values are given if these individual sources give a range of estimates.

Longest theropods

Size comparison of selected giant theropod dinosaurs

Size by overall length, including tail, of all theropods over 12 meters.

  1. Spinosaurus: 14.3–18 m (47–59 ft)[12][19]
  2. Carcharodontosaurus: 12–13.2 m (39–43 ft)[12][20]
  3. Giganotosaurus: 12.5–13 m (41–43 ft)[11][12]
  4. Tyrannosaurus: 12.8 m (42 ft)[21]
  5. Bahariasaurus: (comparable to Tyrannosaurus)[22]
  6. Mapusaurus: >12.2 m (40 ft)[23]

Most massive theropods

Size by overall weight of all theropods with maximum weight estimates of over 4 metric tons.

  1. Spinosaurus: 7-20.9 t[12][19]
  2. Carcharodontosaurus: 6.1-15.1 t[11][12]
  3. Giganotosaurus: 6.5-13.8 t[11][12]
  4. Tyrannosaurus: 6-9.1 t[24][12]
  5. Bahariasaurus: (comparable to Tyrannosaurus)[22]
  6. Deinocheirus: ?9 t[25]
  7. Acrocanthosaurus: 5.6-6.2 t[12][26]
  8. Suchomimus: 3.8-5.2 t[11][12]
  9. Tarbosaurus: 1.6-5 t[24][25]

Shortest non-avian theropods

A list of all known non-avian theropods with an adult length of 1 meter or less, excluding soft tissue such as feathered tails.

  1. Epidexipteryx: 25 cm (9.8 in)[14]
  2. Anchiornis: 34 cm (13 in)[13]
  3. Mei: 53 cm (1.74 ft)[12]
  4. Jinfengopteryx: 55 cm (1.80 ft)[17]
  5. Compsognathus: .60–1.4 m (2.0–4.6 ft)
  6. Sinosauropteryx: 68–94 cm (2.23–3.08 ft)[12][27]
  7. Ligabueino: 70 cm (2.3 ft)
  8. Mahakala: 70 cm (2.3 ft)[28]
  9. Pneumatoraptor: 73 cm (2.40 ft)[29]
  10. Juravenator: .75–1.04 m (2.5–3.4 ft)[12]
  11. Nqwebasaurus: 80 cm (2.6 ft)
  12. Cryptovolans: 90 cm (3.0 ft)
  13. Pedopenna: <1 m (3.3 ft)[30]
  14. Koparion: ?1 m (3.3 ft)
  15. Caenagnathasia: 1 m (3.3 ft)
  16. Shuvuuia: 1 m (3.3 ft)
  17. Mononykus: 1 m (3.3 ft)
  18. Procompsognathus: 1 m (3.3 ft)

Least massive non-avian theropods

A list of all known non-avian theropods with an adult weight of 1 kilogram or less.

  1. Mei: <70 g[12]
  2. Anchiornis: 110 g[13]
  3. Epidexipteryx: 164 g[14]
  4. Compsognathus: 0.26 kg-3.5 kg[11][12]
  5. Juravenator: 0.34 kg[12]
  6. Sinosauropteryx: 0.55 kg[12]
  7. Microraptor: ~1 kg[16]

Sauropods

Sauropod size is difficult to estimate given their usually fragmentary state of preservation. Sauropods are often preserved without their tails, so the margin of error in overall length estimates is high. Mass is calculated using the cube of the length, so for species in which the length is particularly uncertain, the weight is even more so. Estimates that are particularly uncertain (due to very fragmentary or lost material) are preceded by a question mark. Each number represents the highest estimate of a given research paper.

Note that, generally, the giant sauropods can be divided into two categories: the shorter but stockier and more massive forms (mainly titanosaurs and some brachiosaurids), and the longer but slenderer and more light-weight forms (mainly diplodocids).

Longest sauropods

Size comparison of selected giant sauropod dinosaurs

A list of sauropods that reached over 20 meters in length, including neck and tail.

  1. Amphicoelias: 40–60 m (130–200 ft) (131–198 ft)[1]
  2. Supersaurus: 33 to 34 m (108 to 112 ft)[9]
  3. Futalognkosaurus: 32–34 m (105–112 ft)[4]
  4. Sauroposeidon: 28–34 m (92–112 ft)[1][6][7]
  5. Diplodocus: 25.6–33.5 m (84–110 ft)[1][3]
  6. Argentinosaurus: 30 m (98 ft)[1]
  7. Puertasaurus: (comparable to Argentinosaurus)[5]
  8. Hudiesaurus: 30 m (98 ft)[10]
  9. Turiasaurus: >30 m (98 ft)[8]
  10. Barosaurus: 26 m (85 ft)[11]
  11. Paralititan: 26 m (85 ft)[1]
  12. Apatosaurus: 22.8 m (75 ft)[3]
  13. Brachiosaurus: (larger than Giraffatitan)[31]
  14. Giraffatitan: 21.8 m (72 ft)[3]
  15. Mamenchisaurus: 20.4 m (67 ft)[3]
  16. Omeisaurus: 20.2 m (66 ft)[3]

Most massive sauropods

Size by overall weight of all sauropods over 20 metric tons.

  1. Amphicoelias: 122.4 t[1]
  2. Argentinosaurus: 73-88 t[2][3]
  3. Futalognkosaurus: (comparable to Argentinosaurus and Puertasaurus)[4]
  4. Puertasaurus: (comparable to Argentinosaurus)[5]
  5. Paralititan: 59 t[2]
  6. Antarctosaurus: 69 t[3]
  7. Sauroposeidon: 50-60 t[6][7]
  8. Turiasaurus: 40-48 t[8]
  9. Supersaurus: 35-40 t[9]
  10. Diplodocus: 16-38 t[1][3]
  11. Brachiosaurus: 28.7-37 t[31][32]
  12. Giraffatitan: 23-39.5 t[3][31]
  13. Apatosaurus: 20.6 t[3]
  14. Barosaurus: 20 t[11]

Smallest sauropods

A list of all sauropods measuring 10 meters or less in length.

  1. Anchisaurus: 2.4 m (7.9 ft)
  2. Ohmdenosaurus: 4 m (13 ft)
  3. Blikanasaurus: 5 m (16 ft)
  4. Magyarosaurus: 5.3 m (17 ft)
  5. Europasaurus: 6 m (20 ft)
  6. Vulcanodon: 6.5 m (21 ft)
  7. Isanosaurus: 7 m (23 ft)
  8. Camelotia: 9 m (30 ft)
  9. Tazoudasaurus: 9 m (30 ft)
  10. Antetonitrus: 8–10 m (26–33 ft), 1.5–2 m (4.9–6.6 ft) tall at hip
  11. Shunosaurus: 10 m (33 ft)
  12. Brachytrachelopan: 10 m (33 ft)
  13. Amazonsaurus: 10 m (33 ft), 10 tons

Ornithopods

Longest ornithopods

Size comparison of selected giant ornithopod dinosaurs
  1. Zhuchengosaurus: 16.6 m (54 ft) {composite mount)[33]
  2. Lambeosaurus laticaudus: 15 m (49 ft), up to 16.5 m (54 ft)[34]
  3. Shantungosaurus: 14.72 m (48.3 ft) (composite mount)[35]
  4. Charonosaurus: 13 m (43 ft)[36]
  5. Edmontosaurus: 12 m (39 ft)[37] to 13 m (43 ft)[38]
  6. Anatotitan: 12 m (39 ft)[39]
  7. Olorotitan: 12 m (39 ft)[40]
  8. Saurolophus angustirostris: 12 m (39 ft)[41]
  9. Kritosaurus sp.: 11 m (36 ft)[42]
  10. Iguanodon: 10 m (33 ft), up to possibly 13 m (43 ft) for I. bernissartensis[43]

Most massive ornithopods

  1. ?Lambeosaurus laticaudus: up to 23 metric tons (25 short tons)[34]
  2. Shantungosaurus: up to 16 metric tons (17.6 short tons)[44]
  3. Edmontosaurus: 4.0 metric tons (4.4 short tons)[44]
  4. Hypacrosaurus: 4.0 metric tons (4.4 short tons)[44]

Ceratopsians

Longest ceratopsians

Size by overall length, including tail, of all ceratopsians measuring 6 meters or more in length.

  1. Eotriceratops 12 m (39 ft)[45]
  2. Triceratops: 9 m (30 ft)[18]
  3. Pachyrhinosaurus: 8 m (26 ft)[18]
  4. Pentaceratops: 8 m (26 ft)[18]
  5. Diceratus: 7.6 m (25 ft)[18]
  6. Torosaurus: 7.6 m (25 ft)[18]
  7. Agujaceratops: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  8. Arrhinoceratops: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  9. Chasmosaurus: 7 m (23 ft)[18]

Smallest ceratopsians

A list of all ceratopsians 2 metres (6.6 ft) or less in length.

  1. Chaoyangsaurus: 60 cm (2.0 ft)[18]
  2. Graciliceratops: 60 cm (2.0 ft)[18]
  3. Xuanhuaceratops: 60 cm (2.0 ft)[18]
  4. Microceratus: 60 cm (2.0 ft)[18]
  5. Bagaceratops: 90 cm (3.0 ft)[18]
  6. Hongshanosaurus: 1.2 m (3.9 ft)[18]
  7. Archaeoceratops: 1.5 m (4.9 ft)[18]
  8. Yamaceratops: 1.5 m (4.9 ft)[18]
  9. Asiaceratops: 1.8 m (5.9 ft)[18]
  10. Cerasinops: 1.8 m (5.9 ft)[18]
  11. Leptoceratops: 1.8 m (5.9 ft)[18]
  12. Psittacosaurus: 1.8 m (5.9 ft)[18]

Pachycephalosaurs

Longest pachycephalosaurs

  1. Pachycephalosaurus: 4.6 m (15 ft)

Smallest pachycephalosaurs

  1. Wannanosaurus: 60 cm (2.0 ft)
  2. Micropachycephalosaurus: 1 m (3.3 ft)[46]

Thyreophorans

Longest thyreophorans

  1. Ankylosaurus: 6.25–10.7 m (20.5–35.1 ft)[47]
  2. Dacentrurus: 6.1–10.1 m (20–33 ft)
  3. Cedarpelta: 9.0 m (29.5 ft)[18]
  4. Stegosaurus: 9.0 m (29.5 ft)[18]
  5. Tarchia: 8.0 m (26.2 ft)[18]
  6. Sauropelta: 7.6 m (25 ft)[18]
  7. Edmontonia: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  8. Euoplocephalus: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  9. Panoplosaurus: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  10. Saichania: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  11. Shamosaurus: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  12. Tsagantegia: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  13. Tuojiangosaurus: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  14. Gigantspinosaurus: 7 m (23 ft)[18]
  15. Jiangjunosaurus: 7 m (23 ft)[18]

Smallest thyreophorans

  1. Liaoningosaurus (juvenile): ?34 cm (1.12 ft)[18]
  2. Scutellosaurus: 1.2 m (3.9 ft)[18]
  3. Dracopelta: 2 m (6.6 ft)[18]
  4. Minmi: 2 m (6.6 ft)

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