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The diocese of Laon was a Catholic diocese in France, for around 1300 years, up to the French Revolution. From early in the 13th century the bishop of Laon was a pair de France.

Contents

History

The Diocese of Laon was evangelized at an uncertain date by St. Beatus; the see was founded in 487 by St. Remy, who cut it off from the archbishopric of Reims and made his nephew St. Genebaldus bishop.

After a vain attempt made by the unexecuted Concordat of 11 June 1817 to re-establish the See of Laon, the bishop of Soissons was authorized by Pope Leo XII (13 June 1828) to join the title of Laon to that of his own see; by Pope Leo XIII (11 June 1901) it was further authorized to use the title of St-Quentin, which was formerly the residence of the bishop of Noyon.

Bishops

Louis Séguier, nominated by Henry IV of France, Bishop of Laon in 1598, refused the nomination to make room for his young nephew Peter de Bérulle, afterwards cardinal and founder of the Oratorians; de Bérulle refused the see.

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To 1000

  • Genebald (Genebaldus) (Genebaud I. or Guénebauld) (499-†550)
  • Latro (550-570)
  • Gondulphe
  • Elinand I. or Ebreling
  • Robert I.
  • Cagnoald (627-†638)
  • Attole or Attila
  • Vulfadus
  • Serulphe († 681)
  • Peregrin
  • Madalgaire (ca. 682)
  • Liutwin
  • Sigoald
  • Bertifrid
  • Madelvin
  • Genebald(us) II (ca. 744)
  • Bernicon (ca. 766)
  • Gerfrid (774-799)
  • Wenilon I. or Ganelon (800-813)
  • Wenilon II.
  • Egilo
  • Ranfrid
  • Sigebod
  • Ostroald
  • Simon († 847)
  • Pardule (848-†856)
  • Hincmar the younger (857-876, or 858-871)
  • Hedenulphe (876-???)
  • Didon (886-895)
  • Rudolf († 921)
  • Adelelm or Alleaume (921-930)
  • Gosbert († 932)
  • Ingramme († 936)
  • Raoul (936-†949)
  • Roricon (949-976), illegitimate son of Charles the Simple
  • Adalbero Ascelin (977-† 1030) (of the Wigérides)

1000 to 1300

  • Elinand (1052-†1098)
  • Enguerrand († 1104)
  • Gaudry († 1112)
  • Hugo (1112-†1113)
  • Barthelemy de Vir (1114-1150)
  • Gautier de Mortagne (1151-1174)
  • Roger de Rosoy (1175-†1207)
  • Renaud Surdelle (1207-†1210)
  • Robert de Châtillon (1210-†1215)
  • Anselme de Mauny (1215-†1238)
  • Garnier (1238-†1248)
  • Ithier de Mauny (1248-†1261)
  • Guillaume des Moustiers (1262-†1269)
  • Geoffroy de Beaumont (1270-†1279)
  • Guillaume de Châtillon (1280-†1285)
  • Robert de Torote (1285-†1297)
  • Gazon de Savigny (1297-†1307)

1300 to 1500

  • Raoul Rousselet (1317-1325)
  • Albert de Roye (1326-†1336)
  • Roger d'Armagnac (1336-†1339)
  • Hugues d'Arcy (1339-1351)
  • Robert Le Coq(1351-???)
  • Geoffroy le Meingre (1363-†1370)
  • Pierre Aycelin de Montaigut (1370-1386)
  • Jean de Roucy (1386-†1419)
  • Guillaume II. de Champeaux (1420-†1444)
  • Jean Juvénal des Ursins (1444-1449), afterwards Archbishop of Reims
  • Antoine Crespin (1449-1460)
  • Jean de Gaucourt (1460-†1468)
  • Karl of Luxemburg (1472-†1509)
  • Pierre de Montaigut (1371-86), cardinal in 1383

From 1500

  • Louis de Bourbon de Vendôme (1510-1552)
  • Jean Doc (1552-1564)
  • Jean de Bours (1564-†1580)
  • Valentin Douglas (1580-†1598)
  • Geoffroy de Billy (1598-†1612)
  • Benjamin de Brichanteau (1612-†1619)
  • Philibert de Brichanteau (1620-†1652)
  • César d'Estrées (1655-1681)
  • Jean III. d'Estrées (1681-1718)
  • Louis Annet de Clermont de Chaste de Roussillon (-1721)
  • Charles de Saint Albin (1721-1723)
  • Henri François-Xavier de Belsunce-Castelmoron (1723)
  • Etienne Josephe de la Fare (1723-1741)
  • Jean-François-Joseph de Rochechouard de Faudoas (1741-1777)
  • Louis Hector Honoré Maxime de Sabran

External links

This article incorporates text from the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913.


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