Directors Guild of America Awards: Wikis

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The Directors Guild of America Awards are issued annually by the Directors Guild of America. The first DGA Award was an "Honorary Life Member" award issued in 1938 to D.W. Griffith.

The DGA award for "Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures" was first awarded in 1949 to Joseph L. Mankiewicz for A Letter to Three Wives.

The DGA Award for Feature Film has traditionally been a near perfect barometer for the Best Director Academy Award. Only six times since the DGA Award's inception has the DGA Award winner not won the Academy Award; in 1968 (Carol Reed won the Oscar for directing Oliver!); 1972 (Bob Fosse won the Oscar for directing Cabaret); 1985 (Sydney Pollack won the Oscar for directing Out of Africa); 1995 (Mel Gibson won for directing Braveheart); 2000 (Steven Soderbergh won the Oscar for directing Traffic); and 2002 (Roman Polanski won the Oscar for directing The Pianist).

Contents

Categories

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Film

Television

Service and Achievement

Winners

Outstanding Achievement in Feature Film

  • * - Director did not win the Academy Award.
  • ** - Originally, the DGA used a non-calendar year for its award. Both films competed in the 22nd Academy Awards for 1949, and both directors were nominated for Best Director; Mankiewicz won. All the King's Men won Best Picture; Rossen's DGA was not awarded until after the Oscars. (Beginning with the 1951 award in 1952, the DGA has been always awarded before the Oscars.)
  • *** - Was not nominated for Academy Award that year.

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Documentary

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy Series

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Dramatic Series

Outstanding Achievement in Daytime Serials


The Directors Guild of America Awards are issued annually by the Directors Guild of America. The first DGA Award was an "Honorary Life Member" award issued in 1938 to D.W. Griffith.

The DGA award for "Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures" was first awarded in 1949 to Joseph L. Mankiewicz for A Letter to Three Wives.

The DGA Award for Feature Film has traditionally been a near perfect barometer for the Best Director Academy Award. Only six times since the DGA Award's inception has the DGA Award winner not won the Academy Award; in 1968 (Carol Reed won the Oscar for directing Oliver!); 1972 (Bob Fosse won the Oscar for directing Cabaret); 1985 (Sydney Pollack won the Oscar for directing Out of Africa); 1995 (Mel Gibson won for directing Braveheart); 2000 (Steven Soderbergh won the Oscar for directing Traffic); and 2002 (Roman Polanski won the Oscar for directing The Pianist).

Contents

Categories

Film

Television

Service and Achievement

Winners

Outstanding Achievement in Feature Film

  • * - Director did not win the Academy Award.
  • ** - Originally, the DGA used a non-calendar year for its award. Both films competed in the 22nd Academy Awards for 1949, and both directors were nominated for Best Director; Mankiewicz won. All the King's Men won Best Picture; Rossen's DGA was not awarded until after the Oscars. (Beginning with the 1951 award in 1952, the DGA has been always awarded before the Oscars.)
  • *** - Was not nominated for Academy Award that year.

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Documentary

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy Series

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Dramatic Series

Outstanding Achievement in Daytime Serials


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