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Dissorophidae
Fossil range: Late Carboniferous - Early Permian
Amphibamus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Temnospondyli
Zittel, 1888
(unranked): Euskelia
Superfamily: Dissorophoidea
Family: Dissorophidae
Boulenger, 1902
Genera

Alegeinosaurus
Amphibamus
Arkanserpeton
Aspidosaurus
Astreptorhachis
Brevidorsum
Broiliellus
Cacops
Conjunctio
Dissorophus
Ecolsonia
Eoscopus
Fayella
Georgenthalia
[1] Iratusaurus
Kamacops
Longiscitula
Micropholis
Platyhystrix
Zygosaurus

Dissorophidae are an extinct taxon of medium-sized, temnospondyl amphibians that flourished during the Late Pennsylvanian and early Permian periods in what is now North America and Europe. Despite being amphibians, they seem to be well developed for life on land, with well-developed limbs, solid vertebrae, and a row of armour plates of dermal bone, which both protected the animal and further strengthened the backbone.

A well known genus is Cacops, a squat solid animal from the late Early Permian (Artinskian age) Clear Fork group of Texas, with a relatively huge head, and a row of armor plates along the back. In the similar but slightly larger and more specialised genus, Platyhystrix, whose fossil remains are known from the Cutler Group of Utah, Coloardo, and New Mexico, the armor developed into a sort of ridge or sail.

Not all Dissorophids were squat-bodied big headed animals. Fayella, from the late Artinskian of Oklahoma, was lightly built with long limbs, obviously relying on speed rather than armour plating as a defense against predators.

There are a number of related forms which seem to have been more aquatic, which are known from the Late Permian of Russia and the Early Triassic of Gondwana.

It has been suggested that the Dissorophidae may be close to the ancestry of Frogs, via intermediate forms like Doleserpeton.

Gallery

References

  1. ^ Jason S. Anderson, Amy C. Henrici, Stuart S. Sumida, Thomas Martens, and David S. Berman. Georgenthalia clavinasica, A New Genus and Species of Dissorophoid Temnospondyl from the Early Permian of Germany, and the Relationships of the Family Amphibamidae. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology Volume 28, Issue 1 (March 2008) pp. 61–75
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Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

Taxonavigation

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Supergroup: Unikonta
Cladus: Opisthokonta
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Cladus: Deuterostomia
Phylum: Chordata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Infraphylum: Gnathostomata
Superclassis: Tetrapoda
Classis: Amphibia
Subclassis: †Labyrinthodontia
Ordo: Temnospondyli
Subordo: Euskelia
Superfamilia: Dissorophoidea
Familia: Dissorophidae
Genera: Arkanserpeton - Aspidosaurus - Astreptorhachis - Brevidorsum - Broiliellus - Cacops - Conjunctio - Dissorophus - Ecolsonia - Fayella - Iratusaurus - Kamacops - Mordex - Platyhystrix - Zygosaurus

Name

Dissorophidae

Vernacular Name

日本語: ディッソロフス科
Wikimedia Commons For more multimedia, look at Category:Dissorophidae on Wikimedia Commons.

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