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Doc Medich
Pitcher
Born: December 9, 1948 (1948-12-09) (age 61)
Aliquippa, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right 
MLB debut
September 5, 1972 for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1982 for the Milwaukee Brewers
Career statistics
Win-Loss record     124-105
Earned run average     3.77
Strikeouts     955
Teams
Career highlights and awards

George "Doc" Medich (born December 9, 1948 in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania} is a former professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1972-1982. His nickname stems from the fact that during his early baseball career he was a medical student at the University of Pittsburgh. While in college, he pitched for the Pitt baseball team and played tight end on the football team.[1]

He received an M.D, degree from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Contents

Fast Facts

  • In 1974, Medich won a career high 19 games for the Yankees, tied with teammate Pat Dobson for most wins on the team.
  • Medich had his medical license suspended in Pennsylvania due to a "guilty plea to 12 counts of knowingly or intentionally possessing a controlled substance obtained through prescriptions written in the names of patients." It remains suspended and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons voted to expel Medich. [2]
  • Twice in his baseball career Medich went into the stands during a game to aid a fan who was suffering a heart attack. In 1976 in Philadelphia he performed CPR and mouth-to-mouth on a fan who died later that day. In a 1978 game between Medich's Texas Rangers and the Baltimore Orioles he revived a man who was suffering a heart attack. The man survived and lived several more years.

See also

References

  1. ^ O'Brien, Jim (editor) (1982). Hail to Pitt: A Sports History of the University of Pittsburgh. Wolfson Publishing Co. p. 32. ISBN 0-916114-08-2.  
  2. ^ (Source: AAOS Bulletin - August 2006 - http://www2.aaos.org/aaos/archives/bulletin/aug06/fline14.asp)

External links

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