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Donald Eugene Lenhardt (born October 4, 1922, at Alton, Illinois) is a retired outfielder, first baseman, third baseman, scout and coach in American Major League Baseball. In his playing days, he stood 6'3" (190.5 cm), weighed 195 pounds (88.5 kg), and threw and batted right-handed. He was nicknamed "Footsie" by teammates because he often had difficulty finding shoes that fit him properly.[1]

Lenhardt attended the University of Illinois and Washington University in St. Louis, and served in the United States Navy, before joining the St. Louis Browns farm system in 1946. He led the Illinois-Indiana-Iowa League in home runs in 1948 and earned a major league job with the Browns at the start of the 1950 season at age 27. Much-traveled (and frequently traded), he would play in the American League for five seasons (1950-54) for the Browns (twice), Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox (twice), Detroit Tigers, and the Baltimore Orioles (where he was a member of the first modern Baltimore MLB team in 1954). In 481 games, he batted .271 with 61 home runs and 239 runs batted in. His best season was his rookie campaign, for the 1950 Browns, for whom he reached career highs in homers (22) and RBI (81).

After finishing his playing career with Boston farm clubs in 1955-56, Lenhardt became a Midwest-area scout for the Red Sox for over four decades, interrupting that tenure only to serve as first-base coach on Eddie Kasko's staff in Boston from 1970-73. He retired from the Red Sox in 2004.

References

  1. ^ The Sporting News Baseball Register, 1970 edition
  • Marcin, Joe, ed., The Baseball Register 1970 edition. St. Louis: The Sporting News.

External links

Preceded by
Bobby Doerr
Boston Red Sox first-base coach
1970–1973
Succeeded by
Eddie Popowski
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