The Full Wiki

Donnie Darko: Wikis

  
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on Donnie Darko

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Donnie Darko

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Richard Kelly
Produced by Adam Fields
Nancy Juvonen
Sean McKittrick
Drew Barrymore
Written by Richard Kelly
Starring Jake Gyllenhaal
Jena Malone
Mary McDonnell
Katharine Ross
Drew Barrymore
Patrick Swayze
Noah Wyle
James Duval
Music by Michael Andrews
Cinematography Steven B. Poster
Editing by Sam Bauer
Eric Strand
Studio Flower Films
Distributed by Pandora
Newmarket Films
Release date(s) October 26, 2001 (2001-10-26)
Running time Theatrical cut:
113 minutes
Director's cut:
133 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $4.5 million[1]
Gross revenue $4.1 million[2]
Followed by S. Darko

Donnie Darko is a 2001 American science fiction film written and directed by Richard Kelly. The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal, Drew Barrymore, Patrick Swayze, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Noah Wyle, Jena Malone, and Mary McDonnell, and depicts the reality-bending adventures of the title character as he seeks the meaning and significance behind his troubling Doomsday-related visions.

The film was initially slated for a direct-to-video release before being picked up by Newmarket Films. Budgeted with $4.5 million[1] and filmed over the course of 28 days, the film missed breaking even, grossing just over $4.1 million worldwide.[2] Since then, the film has received favorable reviews from critics and developed a large cult following,[3] resulting in the director's cut receiving a two-disc, special edition release in 2004.[4]

Contents

Plot

In 1988, Donnie Darko (Jake Gyllenhaal), a brilliant teenager, has been seeing a psychiatrist, as he seems to be going through a particularly painful puberty. His mother becomes worried about him, after his sister suggests over dinner that he hasn't been taking his medication. Later that night (October 2) Donnie is awakened by a voice and goes downstairs as if sleepwalking where he meets Frank (James Duval), a man in a menacing rabbit costume. Frank tells him that in 28 days, 6 hours, 42 minutes and 12 seconds, the world will end. While he is outside, a jet engine crashes through Donnie's bedroom.

Jim Cunningham (Patrick Swayze) wakes Donnie where he had fallen asleep on the golf course. Donnie notices his forearm where the numerals 28:06:42:12 are written in jagged script. Returning home he is surprised to find police and firemen have cordoned off his home. Donnie is told a jet engine has fallen through his room, although it is unknown where it came from.

As Eddie, Donnie's father, drives him to the office of his therapist, Dr. Lillian Thurman (Katharine Ross), Eddie nearly runs over Roberta Sparrow (Patience Cleveland), also known as "Grandma Death": a seemingly senile old woman who spends her days walking back and forth from her house to a mailbox for a letter that never comes. Grandma Death whispers something in Donnie's ear that startles him. It is later learned that she had whispered, "every living creature on earth dies alone."

In his English class, Donnie meets a new student, Gretchen Ross (Jena Malone). Meanwhile, Frank continues to appear to Donnie and tell him that he can do anything and will not get caught. Frank also tells Donnie about time travel, further confusing him. Donnie, apparently at Frank's urging, commits several acts of violence against property; flooding the school and torching the home of Jim Cunningham, an inspirational speaker. Cunningham's methods have been much admired by Kitty Farmer (Beth Grant), one of the teachers at Donnie's school.

Gretchen and Donnie grow closer. She is one of the few people he opens up to about his time-travel visions. Dr. Thurman increases Donnie's medication and begins hypnotherapy with him. Frank continues to appear to Donnie.

With the inspirational speaker, Jim Cunningham, accused of running a "kiddie porn dungeon", Kitty Farmer asks Donnie's mother to accompany the school's dance team to LA for an appearance on the show, Star Search. Donnie's older sister, Elizabeth (Maggie Gyllenhaal), and Donnie decide to throw a Halloween party while their mother, Rose (Mary McDonnell), and younger sister, Sam (Daveigh Chase), are away. The night of the party, October 30, Gretchen comes to Donnie's house for safety because her mother has suddenly disappeared.

At midnight, Donnie realizes that the 28 days have passed, and that only 6 hours remain until the end of the world. Convinced that Grandma Death is in some way connected to Frank, Donnie persuades Gretchen and two other friends to leave the party and go with him to her house. There, they are assaulted by the high school bullies (Alex Greenwald and Seth Rogen). Gretchen is knocked unconscious and thrown into the street. An approaching car scares the bullies off but swerves to avoid Grandma Death who is standing in the road and runs directly over Gretchen. Stopping the car, Frank gets out and starts yelling at Donnie, who lifts his father's stolen pistol and shoots Frank through his right eye (a wound seen earlier as the 'menacing rabbit' Frank pulled off his mask).

Grandma Death tells Donnie (Director's cut) that he must hurry as a storm is forming and he has a lot to do. Donnie can't wake Gretchen and ends up carrying her lifeless body to his home. There he kisses his sleeping sister's forehead, grabs some keys and speeds away in the family car with Gretchen. We see a strange, inverted, black cloud forming over Donnie's house. Next Donnie watches from some road in the hills above town as a tornado forms over the city. Donnie seems at peace now, as a vortex engulfs the jet his mother and sister are returning home in, apparently they are caught up in the storm above Donnie's home. Suddenly the jet is shaken violently and we see the engine torn from the wing and begin to fall, creating a whirling pathway through the sky.

Director's cut ending

Suddenly, Elizabeth opens the family's home's front door, closes it, and leans against the door, as she had done at the beginning of the film. Her father is asleep in his chair. Donnie, lying upstairs in his bed, starts to laugh maniacally, then the noise grows as the house begins to shake violently. Donnie is now seen asleep in his bed. As the house starts to fall apart, we see his mother in her bed as the massive jet engine that had, only minutes before, fallen from the plane carrying his mother and sister, crashes through Donnie's bedroom.

Theatrical version ending

In the theatrical version it is once again October 2. Donnie is once again in bed, having possibly traveled back in time to create an ontological paradox, where his future self takes the place of his past self. On this occasion Donnie has returned to his bed, where in the beginning of the film he had followed a strange voice, as he walked outside and met Frank. As he laughs maniacally, a jet engine crashes through the roof, killing him.

Common ending

All the people affected by Donnie's actions are then shown in short scenes that briefly reference the events as they happen with Donnie never having taken his walk to meet Frank. The Tears For Fears' song "Mad World", covered by Gary Jules, is played with the words matching the scenes. As Donnie's body is taken away, Gretchen, having never met Donnie, rides by the Darkos' house on her bicycle. She learns from a neighborhood boy about what has just happened and then waves to Rose, who stands smoking a cigarette.

Director's interpretation

Writer/director Richard Kelly does not deny the validity of personal interpretations, but has expressed his own theories through the extra commentary on the two DVDs, and in various other interviews.

According to Kelly and his fictional Philosophy of Time Travel, at midnight on October 2 - a Tangent Universe branches off the Primary Universe around the time when Donnie is called out of his bedroom by Frank, immediately before the appearance of the Artifact, the faulty jet engine. The inherently unstable Tangent Universe will collapse in just over 28 days and take the Primary Universe with it if not corrected. Closing the Tangent Universe is the duty of the Living Receiver, Donnie, who wields certain supernatural powers to help him in the task.

Those who die within the Tangent Universe (and would not have died otherwise) are the Manipulated Dead (Frank, Gretchen). Frank, at least, is also given certain powers in that he is able to subtly understand what is happening and have the ability to contact and influence the Living Receiver via the Fourth Dimensional Construct (water). All others within the orbit of the Living Receiver are the Manipulated Living (e.g. Ms. Pomeroy, Dr. Monnitoff), subconsciously drawn to push him towards his destiny to close the Tangent Universe and, according to the Philosophy of Time Travel, die by the Artifact.

Frank appears in the story in two guises (three guises if we assume that he 'never' dies on account of the restoration of the Primary Universe through the negation of the Tangent Universe). First, there is the Manipulated Dead Frank who appears to Donnie as a premonition from the future of the Tangent Universe in the disturbing rabbit suit. Dead Frank is aware of Donnie's fate and destiny, and impels him to realize it so that the Primary Universe can be restored at the point where/when the Tangent Universe branched off from it. Secondly, Frank appears alive as Donnie's sister's boyfriend, whose fate unfolds within the Tangent Universe by means of Donnie's successes in realizing his mission. This living boyfriend is fatally shot by Donnie towards the end of the film, a killing which was foreseen by Donnie.

Cast

Production

Filming

The Long Beach, California home used in Donnie Darko as the fictional, upscale home of motivational speaker Jim Cunningham.

Donnie Darko was filmed in 28 days on a budget of $4.5 million.[1] It almost went straight to home video release but was publicly released by the production company Flower Films.[5]

The film was shot in California. The "Carpathian ridge" scenes were shot on the Angeles Crest Highway.[6] Loyola High School, a prominent Catholic school in Los Angeles, California, was used as Donnie's high school. The house where the Darko family lives is located in Long Beach, California. Donnie awakens in a golf course in Long Beach, California; the hotel where his family lodges is the Burbank, California, Holiday Inn; and the Aero theater where Donnie and Gretchen watch the double feature is a cinema in Santa Monica, California.

Music

In 2003, composer Michael Andrews and singer Gary Jules found their piano-driven cover of the Tears for Fears' hit "Mad World", featured in the film as part of the end sequence, and the song was the UK Christmas Number One single in 2003.[7] One continuous sequence involving an introduction of Donnie's high school prominently features the song "Head Over Heels" by Tears for Fears, Samantha's dance group, "Sparkle Motion," performs with the song "Notorious" by Duran Duran, and "Under the Milky Way" by The Church is played after Donnie and Gretchen emerge from his room during the party. "Love Will Tear Us Apart" by Joy Division also appears in the film diegetically during the party and shots of Donnie and Gretchen upstairs. However, the version included was released in 1995, although the film is set in 1988. The opening sequence is set to "The Killing Moon" by Echo & the Bunnymen. In the theatrical cut, the song playing during the Halloween party is "Proud to be Loud" by Pantera, a track released on their 1988 album, which would coincide with the time setting of the film. However, the band is credited as "The Dead Green Mummies".

In the re-released Director's Cut version of the film, the music in the opening sequence is replaced by "Never Tear Us Apart" by INXS; "Under the Milky Way" is moved to the scene of Donnie and his father driving home from Donnie's meeting with his therapist; and "The Killing Moon" is played as Gretchen and Donnie return to the party from Donnie's parents' room.

Release

The limited release of the film occurred during the month after the September 11 attacks. It was subsequently held back for almost a year for international release, where it garnered more favorable reviews.[citation needed] From this point, a large cult following for the movie began. Its DVD release gained an increased American audience for the film.

Marketing

  • The Donnie Darko Book, written by Richard Kelly, is a 2003 book about the film. It includes an introduction by Jake Gyllenhaal, the screenplay of the Donnie Darko Director's Cut, an in-depth interview with Kelly, facsimile pages from the Philosophy of Time Travel, photos and drawings from the film, and artwork it inspired.
  • NECA released first a six-inch (15 cm) figure of Frank the Bunny and later a foot-tall (30cm) 'talking' version of the same figure.

Home media

The film was originally released on DVD and VHS in March 2002. Strong DVD sales led Newmarket Films to release a "Director's Cut" on DVD in 2004. Bob Berney, President of Newmarket Films, described the film as "a runaway hit on DVD," citing United States sales of more than $10 million.

The film was released on Blu-ray on February 10, 2009.

Director's Cut

The Director's cut of the film was released on May 29, 2004, in Seattle, Washington, at the Seattle International Film Festival and later in New York City and Los Angeles on July 23, 2004. This cut includes twenty minutes of extra footage, an altered soundtrack, the director's commentary assisted by Kevin Smith, the director's interpretation, and visual excerpts from the book The Philosophy of Time Travel. The director's cut DVD, released on February 15, 2005, included the new footage and more soundtrack changes, as well as some additional features exclusive to the two-DVD set: excerpts from the storyboard, a 52-minute production diary, "#1 fan video", a "cult following" video interviewing British fans, and the new director's cut trailer. The director's cut DVD was released as a giveaway with copies of the British Sunday Times newspaper on February 19, 2006.

Reception

Box office performance

Donnie Darko had its first screening at the Sundance Film Festival on January 19, 2001, and debuted in United States theaters in October 2001 to a tepid response. Shown on only 58 screens nationwide, the film grossed $110,494 in its opening weekend.[8] By the time the film closed in United States theaters on April 11, 2002, it had earned just $517,375.[2][8] It ultimately grossed $4.1 million worldwide.[2]

Despite its poor box office showing, the film began to attract a devoted fan base. It was originally released on DVD and VHS in March 2002. During this time, the Pioneer Theatre in New York City's East Village began midnight screenings of Donnie Darko that continued for 28 consecutive months.[7]

Critical reception

The film received widespread critical acclaim—Rotten Tomatoes gave the film an 84% rating (the Director's Cut received 91%),[4] while Metacritic gave it a 71 out of 100 (the Director's Cut received 88 out of 100). Critic Andy Bailey billed Donnie Darko as a "Sundance surprise" that "isn't spoiled by the Hollywood forces that helped birth it." Jean Oppenheimer of New Times (LA) praised the film, saying, "Like gathering storm clouds, Donnie Darko creates an atmosphere of eerie calm and mounting menace -- stands as one of the most exceptional movies of 2001."[9] Writing for ABC Australia, Megan Spencer called the movie, "menacing, dreamy, [and] exciting" and noted that "it could take you to a deeply emotional place lying dormant in your soul."[10] At first when the movie was released, Roger Ebert gave the film a less than positive review but later became more enamored by the film after seeing the release of the director's cut.[11]

Awards and nominations

2001 — Richard Kelly won with Donnie Darko for "Best Screenplay" at the Catalonian International Film Festival and at the San Diego Film Critics Society. Donnie Darko also won the "Audience Award" for Best Feature at the Sweden Fantastic Film Festival. The film was nominated for "Best Film" at the Catalonian International Film Festival and for the "Grand Jury Prize" at the Sundance Film Festival.

2002 — Donnie Darko won the "Special Award" at the Young Filmmakers Showcase at the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. The movie also won the "Silver Scream Award" at the Amsterdam Fantastic Film Festival. Kelly was nominated for "Best First Feature" and "Best First Screenplay" with Donnie Darko, as well as Jake Gyllenhaal being nominated for "Best Male Lead," at the Independent Spirit Awards. The film was also nominated for the "Best Breakthrough Film" at the Online Film Critics Society Awards.

2003 — Jake Gyllenhaal won "Best Actor" and Richard Kelly "Best Original Screenplay" for Donnie Darko at the Chlotrudis Awards, where Kelly was also nominated for "Best Director" and "Best Movie."

2005 — Donnie Darko ranked in the top five on My Favourite Film, an Australian poll conducted by the ABC.[12]

2006 — Donnie Darko ranks ninth in FilmFour's 50 Films to See Before You Die.[13]

It also came in at number 14 on Entertainment Weekly's list of the 50 Best High School Movies and landed at number 2 in their "Greatest Independent Films of All Time" list.

Sequel

A 2009 sequel, S. Darko, centers on Samantha Darko, Donnie's younger sister. Again played by Daveigh Chase, Samantha begins to have strange dreams that hint at a major catastrophe. Donnie Darko creator Richard Kelly has stated that he has no involvement in this sequel, as he does not own the rights to the original.[14] Daveigh and producer Adam Fields are the only creative links between it and the original film. The sequel received mostly negative reviews.[15][16]

Adaptations

Marcus Stern, associate director of the American Repertory Theater, directed a staged adaptation of Donnie Darko at the Zero Arrow Theatre in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the fall of 2007. It ran from October 27 to November 18, 2007, with opening night fittingly scheduled on Halloween.

An article written by the production drama team stated that the director and production team planned to "embrace the challenge to make the fantastical elements come alive on stage."[17] In 2004, Stern adapted and directed Kelly's screenplay for a graduate student production at the American Repertory Theatre's Institute for Advanced Theatre Training (I.A.T.T./M.X.A.T.).

A 60 second version was created for the Empire Film Awards by Tea Fuelled Art[18]

References

  1. ^ a b c Richard Kelly (director). (2004). Donnie Darko: The Director's Cut. [DVD]. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Donnie Darko". The Numbers: Box Office Data, Movie Stars, Idle Speculation. http://www.the-numbers.com/movies/2001/DARKO.php. Retrieved 26 August 2009. 
  3. ^ The AV Club - "The New Cult Canon: Donnie Darko"
  4. ^ a b "Donnie Darko film review". Rotten Tomatoes. IGN.com. 2001. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/donnie_darko/. Retrieved 2008-09-11. 
  5. ^ "'Darko' takes a long, strange trip". USA Today. http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2005-02-14-dvd-donnie-darko_x.htm. Retrieved 2005-02-14. 
  6. ^ Poster, Steven (Cinematographer). (2004). Donnie Darko Production Diary. [DVD]. 20th Century Fox. 
  7. ^ a b "Donnie Darko". Indie Wire. http://www.indiewire.com/movies/movies_040722darko.html. Retrieved 2006-05-17. 
  8. ^ a b "Donnie Darko (2001)". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=donniedarko.htm. Retrieved 2009-08-25. 
  9. ^ "Donnie Darko". Indie Wire. http://www.indiewire.com/movies/rev_01Sund_010121_Darco.html. Retrieved 2006-05-17. 
  10. ^ Review of Donnie Darko, by Megan Spencer, for ABC Australia.
  11. ^ "Donnie Darko: The Director's Cut". Rogerebert.com. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040820/REVIEWS/408200303/1023. Retrieved 2009-04-20. 
  12. ^ "My Favourite Film". ABC. http://www.abc.net.au/myfavouritefilm/. Retrieved 2006-07-11. 
  13. ^ "C4 relaunches Film4 with '50 films to see before you die' list countdown". Brand Republic. http://www.brandrepublic.com/bulletins/br/article/567497/c4-relaunches-film4-50-films-die-countdown/. Retrieved 2006-09-16. 
  14. ^ "IGN Article". IGN. http://movies.ign.com/articles/873/873472p1.html. Retrieved 2009-01-28. 
  15. ^ "S. Darko review". A.V. Club. 2009-05-13. http://www.avclub.com/articles/s-darko,27924/. Retrieved 2009-05-13. 
  16. ^ "rottentomatoes.com". http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/s_darko_a_donnie_darko_tale/. Retrieved 2010-02-03. 
  17. ^ Sarah Wallace (2007-08-07). "Bringing the End of the World to Life". American Repertory Theatre. http://www.amrep.org/articles/6_1c/bringing.html. Retrieved 2007-10-14. 
  18. ^ "Done in 60 seconds competition". empireonline.com. http://www.empireonline.com/awards2010/donein60seconds/. Retrieved 14 February 2010. 
  • Commentary with Kevin Smith (2003), Donnie Darko Directors Cut, Faber and Faber, ISBN 0571221246 

External links


Donnie Darko
File:Donnie Darko
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Richard Kelly
Produced by Adam Fields
Nancy Juvonen
Sean McKittrick
Drew Barrymore
Written by Richard Kelly
Starring Jake Gyllenhaal
Jena Malone
Mary McDonnell
Katharine Ross
Drew Barrymore
Patrick Swayze
Maggie Gyllenhaal
Noah Wyle
James Duval
Music by Michael Andrews
Cinematography Steven B. Poster
Editing by Sam Bauer
Eric Strand
Studio Flower Films
Distributed by Pandora
Newmarket Films
Release date(s) October 26, 2001 (2001-10-26)
Running time 113 minutes (Theatrical)
133 minutes (Director's cut)
Country United States
Language English
Budget $4.5 million[1]
Gross revenue $4,116,307[2]
Followed by S. Darko

Donnie Darko is a 2001 American psychological thriller-fantasy film directed and written by Richard Kelly. It stars Jake Gyllenhaal, Drew Barrymore, Patrick Swayze, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Noah Wyle, Jena Malone, and Mary McDonnell, and depicts the reality-bending adventures of the title character as he seeks the meaning and significance behind his troubling Doomsday-related visions.

The film was initially slated for a direct-to-video release before being picked up by Newmarket Films. Budgeted with $4.5 million[1] and filmed over the course of 28 days, the film missed breaking even at the box office, grossing just over $4.1 million worldwide.[2] Since then, the film has received favorable reviews from critics and developed a large cult following,[3] resulting in the director's cut receiving a two-disc, special edition release in 2004.[4]

Contents

Plot

In October 1988, teenager Donnie Darko (Jake Gyllenhaal) has been seeing a psychiatrist because of his troubled history. Donnie sleepwalks, and he has visions of Frank (James Duval), a menacing rabbit. On October 2nd, Frank draws Donnie out of his room to tell him that, in 28 days, 6 hours, 42 minutes and 12 seconds, the world will end. While Donnie is outside, a jet engine crashes through his bedroom. The next morning, Jim Cunningham (Patrick Swayze), a motivational speaker, finds Donnie sleeping on the golf course and wakes him. Donnie returns home to find police and firemen at his home. After an initial investigation, no one knows where the jet engine has come from. The following day, Donnie meets Gretchen Ross (Jena Malone), a new student, who becomes one of the few people with whom Donnie can share his visions.

Donnie's father, Eddie (Holmes Osborne), takes Donnie to his therapist, Dr. Lillian Thurman (Katharine Ross), and nearly runs over Roberta Sparrow (Patience Cleveland), a seemingly senile old woman known as "Grandma Death". Afterward, Dr. Thurman increases Donnie's medication and begins hypnotherapy. Frank continues to appear to Donnie and manipulates him to commit a series of crimes and, also, tells Donnie about time travel. Donnie floods the school, steals his father's gun, and burns the home of Jim Cunningham, where firemen uncover a "kiddie porn dungeon."

Donnie, along with his older sister, Elizabeth (Maggie Gyllenhaal), decide to throw a Halloween party while their mother, Rose (Mary McDonnell), and younger sister, Sam, (Daveigh Chase), are away at a dance competition. Gretchen comes to Donnie's house for safety because her mother has suddenly disappeared, likely because of her threatening stepfather. At midnight, Donnie realizes that the 28 days have passed and that only 6 hours remain until the end of the world. Donnie leaves to visit "Grandma Death" along with Gretchen and two friends. While there, they are assaulted by the high school bullies (Alex Greenwald and Seth Rogen). Gretchen is knocked unconscious and thrown into the street. An approaching car swerves to avoid "Grandma Death" standing in the road, but runs over Gretchen, killing her. As the bullies run off, a man wearing a bunny rabbit suit, Frank, emerges from the car. Frank starts yelling at Donnie, who shoots Frank with his father's stolen pistol.

Donnie carries Gretchen's lifeless body to his home, places her in his family car, and speeds away. Donnie watches from nearby as a tornado forms over the city. For once, Donnie seems at peace now as a vortex engulfs the jet his mother and sister are returning home in. The storm damages the plane causing an engine to fall off back-in-time to 28 days earlier. This time, though, Donnie chooses to stay in bed. He laughs and turns over as if to sleep just as the jet engine crashes through his bedroom, crushing him to death. As his body is taken away the next morning Gretchen passes by on her bike and is informed by a neighborhood boy about what has happened. Gretchen tells the boy that she never knew Donnie, and she gives a sympathetic wave to Rose.

Cast

Director's interpretation

Writer/director Richard Kelly does not deny the validity of personal interpretations, but has expressed his own theories through the extra commentary on the two DVDs, and in various other interviews.

Some viewers theorize, at midnight on October 2, a "Tangent Universe" branches off the "Primary Universe" around the time when Donnie is called out of his bedroom by Frank, immediately before the appearance of the Artifact, the faulty jet engine. The inherently unstable Tangent Universe will collapse in just over 28 days and take the Primary Universe with it if not corrected. Closing the Tangent Universe is the duty of the "Living Receiver", Donnie, who wields certain supernatural powers to help him in the task.

Those who die within the Tangent Universe and would not have died otherwise are the "Manipulated Dead" (Frank, Gretchen). Frank, at least, is also given certain powers in that he is able to subtly understand what is happening and to contact and influence the Living Receiver via the "Fourth Dimensional Construct", water. All others within the orbit of the Living Receiver are the "Manipulated Living" (e.g. Ms. Pomeroy, Dr. Monnitoff), subconsciously drawn to push him towards his destiny to close the Tangent Universe and, according to the Philosophy of Time Travel, die by the Artifact.

Frank appears in the story in two guises. First, there is the dead Frank who appears to Donnie as a premonition from the future of the Tangent Universe in the disturbing rabbit suit. This Frank is aware of Donnie's destiny and impels Donnie to realize it through his manipulation. Second, Frank appears alive as Donnie's sister's boyfriend, whose fate unfolds within the Tangent Universe by means of Donnie's successes in realizing his mission. Donnie fatally shoots this Frank near the end of the film, fulfilling Donnie's destiny as the Living Receiver and resolving the Tangent and Primary Universes.

Production

Filming

File:Weird Science house northwest view
The Long Beach, California home used in Donnie Darko as the fictional, upscale home of motivational speaker, Jim Cunningham

Donnie Darko was filmed in 28 days on a budget of $4.5 million.[1] It almost went straight to home video release but was publicly released by the production company Flower Films.[5]

The film was shot in California. The "Carpathian ridge" scenes were shot on the Angeles Crest Highway.[6] Loyola High School, a prominent Catholic school in Los Angeles, California, was used as Donnie's private high school. The house where the Darko family lives is located in Long Beach, California. Donnie awakens in a golf course in Long Beach, California; the hotel where his family lodges is the Burbank, California, Holiday Inn; and the Aero theater where Donnie and Gretchen watch the double feature is a cinema in Santa Monica, California.

Music

In 2003, composer Michael Andrews and singer Gary Jules found their piano-driven cover of the Tears for Fears' "Mad World", featured in the film as part of the end sequence, a hit and the UK Christmas Number One.[7]

One continuous sequence involving an introduction of Donnie's high school prominently features the song "Head Over Heels" by Tears for Fears, Samantha's dance group, "Sparkle Motion", performs with the song "Notorious" by Duran Duran, and "Under the Milky Way" by The Church is played after Donnie and Gretchen emerge from his room during the party. "Love Will Tear Us Apart" by Joy Division also appears in the film diegetically during the party and shots of Donnie and Gretchen upstairs. However, the version included was released in 1995, although the film is set in 1988. The opening sequence is set to "The Killing Moon" by Echo & the Bunnymen. In the theatrical cut, the song playing during the Halloween party is "Proud to be Loud" by Pantera, a track released on their 1988 album, which would coincide with the time setting of the film. However, the band is credited as "The Dead Green Mummies".

In the re-released Director's Cut version of the film, the music in the opening sequence is replaced by "Never Tear Us Apart" by INXS; "Under the Milky Way" is moved to the scene of Donnie and his father driving home from Donnie's meeting with his therapist; and "The Killing Moon" is played as Gretchen and Donnie return to the party from Donnie's parents' room.

Release

The limited release of the film occurred during the month after the September 11 attacks. It was subsequently held back for almost a year for international release, where it garnered more favorable reviews.[citation needed] From this point, a large cult following for the movie began. Its DVD release gained an increased American audience for the film.

Marketing

  • The Donnie Darko Book, written by Richard Kelly, is a 2003 book about the film. It includes an introduction by Jake Gyllenhaal, the screenplay of the Donnie Darko Director's Cut, an in-depth interview with Kelly, facsimile pages from the Philosophy of Time Travel, photos and drawings from the film, and artwork it inspired.
  • NECA released first a six-inch (15 cm) figure of Frank the Bunny and later a foot-tall (30cm) 'talking' version of the same figure.

Home media

The film was originally released on VHS and DVD in March 2002. Strong DVD sales led Newmarket Films to release a "Director's Cut" on DVD in 2004. Bob Berney, President of Newmarket Films, described the film as "a runaway hit on DVD," citing United States sales of more than $10 million.

The film was released in the US on Blu-ray on February 10, 2009.

The film was released as a 2-disc Blu-ray special edition in the UK on July 19, 2010 by Metrodome Distribution and featuring both Original and Director's Cut. Also including commentaries from Director Richard Kelly and Jake Gyllenhaal, Richard Kelly and Kevin Smith and Cast and Crew including Drew Barrymore.

Director's cut

The Director's cut of the film was released on May 29, 2004, in Seattle, Washington, at the Seattle International Film Festival and later in New York City and Los Angeles on July 23, 2004. This cut includes twenty minutes of extra footage, an altered soundtrack, and visual excerpts from the (non existant) book The Philosophy of Time Travel.

The director's cut DVD, released on February 15, 2005, includes the new footage and more soundtrack changes, as well as some additional features exclusive to the two-DVD set: the director's commentary assisted by Kevin Smith, excerpts from the storyboard, a 52-minute production diary, "#1 fan video", a "cult following" video interviewing British fans, and the new director's cut trailer. The director's cut DVD was released as a giveaway with copies of the British Sunday Times newspaper on February 19, 2006.

Reception

Box office performance

Donnie Darko had its first screening at the Sundance Film Festival on January 19, 2001, and debuted in United States theaters in October 2001 to a tepid response. Shown on only 58 screens nationwide, the film grossed $110,494 in its opening weekend.[8] By the time the film closed in United States theaters on April 11, 2002, it had earned just $517,375.[2][8] It ultimately grossed $4.1 million worldwide.[2]

Despite its poor box office showing, the film began to attract a devoted fan base. It was originally released on DVD and VHS in March 2002. During this time, the Pioneer Theatre in New York City's East Village began midnight screenings of Donnie Darko that continued for 28 consecutive months.[7]

Critical reception

The film received widespread critical acclaim—Rotten Tomatoes gave the film an 84% rating (the Director's Cut received 91%),[4] while Metacritic gave it a 71 out of 100 (the Director's Cut received 88 out of 100). Critic Andy Bailey billed Donnie Darko as a "Sundance surprise" that "isn't spoiled by the Hollywood forces that helped birth it." Jean Oppenheimer of New Times (LA) praised the film, saying, "Like gathering storm clouds, Donnie Darko creates an atmosphere of eerie calm and mounting menace -- stands as one of the most exceptional movies of 2001."[9] Writing for ABC Australia, Megan Spencer called the movie, "menacing, dreamy, [and] exciting" and noted that "it could take you to a deeply emotional place lying dormant in your soul."[10] At first when the movie was released, Roger Ebert gave the film a less than positive review but later gave a positive review of the director's cut.[11]

Awards and nominations

2001 — Richard Kelly won with Donnie Darko for "Best Screenplay" at the Catalonian International Film Festival and at the San Diego Film Critics Society. Donnie Darko also won the "Audience Award" for Best Feature at the Sweden Fantastic Film Festival. The film was nominated for "Best Film" at the Catalonian International Film Festival and for the "Grand Jury Prize" at the Sundance Film Festival.

2002 — Donnie Darko won the "Special Award" at the Young Filmmakers Showcase at the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films. The movie also won the "Silver Scream Award" at the Amsterdam Fantastic Film Festival. Kelly was nominated for "Best First Feature" and "Best First Screenplay" with Donnie Darko, as well as Jake Gyllenhaal being nominated for "Best Male Lead," at the Independent Spirit Awards. The film was also nominated for the "Best Breakthrough Film" at the Online Film Critics Society Awards.

2003 — Jake Gyllenhaal won "Best Actor" and Richard Kelly "Best Original Screenplay" for Donnie Darko at the Chlotrudis Awards, where Kelly was also nominated for "Best Director" and "Best Movie."

2005 — Donnie Darko ranked in the top five on My Favourite Film, an Australian poll conducted by the ABC.[12]

2006 — Donnie Darko ranks ninth in FilmFour's 50 Films to See Before You Die.[13]

It also came in at #14 on Entertainment Weekly's list of the 50 Best High School Movies and landed at #2 in Empire's "Greatest Independent Films of All Time" list.

Sequel

A 2009 sequel, S. Darko, centers on Sam Darko, Donnie's younger sister. Again played by Daveigh Chase, Sam begins to have strange dreams that hint at a major catastrophe. Donnie Darko creator Richard Kelly has stated that he has no involvement in this sequel, as he does not own the rights to the original.[14] Chase and producer Adam Fields are the only creative links between it and the original film. The sequel received mostly negative reviews.[15][16]

Adaptations

Marcus Stern, associate director of the American Repertory Theater, directed a staged adaptation of Donnie Darko at the Zero Arrow Theatre in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the fall of 2007. It ran from October 27 to November 18, 2007, with opening night fittingly scheduled on Halloween.

An article written by the production drama team stated that the director and production team planned to "embrace the challenge to make the fantastical elements come alive on stage."[17] In 2004, Stern adapted and directed Kelly's screenplay for a graduate student production at the American Repertory Theatre's Institute for Advanced Theatre Training (I.A.T.T./M.X.A.T.).

A 60 second version was created for the Empire Film Awards by Tea Fuelled Art.[18]

References

  1. ^ a b c Richard Kelly (director). (2004). Donnie Darko: The Director's Cut. [DVD]. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Donnie Darko". The Numbers: Box Office Data, Movie Stars, Idle Speculation. http://www.the-numbers.com/movies/2001/DARKO.php. Retrieved 26 August 2009. 
  3. ^ The AV Club - "The New Cult Canon: Donnie Darko"
  4. ^ a b "Donnie Darko film review". Rotten Tomatoes. IGN.com. 2001. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/donnie_darko/. Retrieved 2008-09-11. 
  5. ^ Snider, Mike (2005-02-14). "'Darko' takes a long, strange trip". USA Today. http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2005-02-14-dvd-donnie-darko_x.htm. Retrieved 2005-02-14. 
  6. ^ Poster, Steven (Cinematographer). (2004). Donnie Darko Production Diary. [DVD]. 20th Century Fox. 
  7. ^ a b "Donnie Darko". Indie Wire. Archived from the original on 2006-05-12. http://web.archive.org/web/20060512113236/http://www.indiewire.com/movies/movies_040722darko.html. Retrieved 2006-05-17. 
  8. ^ a b "Donnie Darko (2001)". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=donniedarko.htm. Retrieved 2009-08-25. 
  9. ^ "Donnie Darko". Indie Wire. Archived from the original on 2005-12-14. http://web.archive.org/web/20051214020504/http://www.indiewire.com/movies/rev_01Sund_010121_Darco.html. Retrieved 2006-05-17. 
  10. ^ Review of Donnie Darko, by Megan Spencer, for ABC Australia.
  11. ^ "Donnie Darko: The Director's Cut". Rogerebert.com. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040820/REVIEWS/408200303/1023. Retrieved 2009-04-20. 
  12. ^ "My Favourite Film". ABC. http://www.abc.net.au/myfavouritefilm/. Retrieved 2006-07-11. 
  13. ^ "C4 relaunches Film4 with '50 films to see before you die' list countdown". Brand Republic. http://www.brandrepublic.com/bulletins/br/article/567497/c4-relaunches-film4-50-films-die-countdown/. Retrieved 2006-09-16. 
  14. ^ "IGN Article". IGN. http://movies.ign.com/articles/873/873472p1.html. Retrieved 2009-01-28. 
  15. ^ "S. Darko review". A.V. Club. 2009-05-13. http://www.avclub.com/articles/s-darko,27924/. Retrieved 2009-05-13. 
  16. ^ "rottentomatoes.com". http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/s_darko_a_donnie_darko_tale/. Retrieved 2010-02-03. 
  17. ^ Sarah Wallace (2007-08-07). "Bringing the End of the World to Life". American Repertory Theatre.  Archive copy at the Wayback Machine.
  18. ^ "Done in 60 seconds competition". empireonline.com. http://www.empireonline.com/awards2010/donein60seconds/videos/shortlist17.asp. Retrieved 14 February 2010. 
  • Commentary with Kevin Smith (2003). Donnie Darko Directors Cut. Faber and Faber. ISBN 0571221246 

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Donnie Darko is a 2001 film about a troubled teenager who, after escaping death, is driven to manipulate a complex chain of events that will change the destinies of himself and those around him.

Written and directed by Richard Kelly.
Life is one long insane trip. Some people just have better directions.Taglines

Contents

Donnie Darko

  • [in a letter] Dear Roberta Sparrow, I reached into your book and... there's so many things i need to ask you. Sometimes I'm afraid of what you might tell me. Sometimes I'm afraid that you'll tell me that this is not a work of fiction. I can only hope that the answers will come to me in my sleep. I hope that when the world comes to an end, I can breathe a sigh of relief because there will be so much to look forward to.
  • [reading his poem in class]

    A storm is coming, Frank says
    A storm that will swallow the children
    And I will deliver them from the kingdom of pain
    I will deliver the children back to their doorsteps
    And send the monsters back to the underground
    I'll send them back to a place where no-one else can see them
    Except for me
    Because I am Donnie Darko.

Gretchen Ross

  • Some people are just born with tragedy in their blood.
  • What if you could go back in time and take all those hours of pain and darkness and replace them with something better?

Kitty Farmer

  • Okay, now girls... I want you to concentrate. Failure is not an option. And Bethany, if you feel the need to vomit up there... just swallow it.

Roberta Sparrow

  • Every living creature on this earth dies alone.

Dialogue

Gretchen Ross: Donnie Darko? What the hell kind of name is that? It's like some sort of superhero or something.
Donnie: What makes you think I'm not?
Gretchen: You're weird.
Donnie: Sorry.
Gretchen: No, that was a compliment.

Sean Smith: Beer and pussy. That's all I need.
Ronald Fisher: Well we gotta find ourselves a Smurfette.
Sean Smith: Smurfette?
Ronald Fisher: Mmm-hmm [gulps beer]. Not some like tight-ass Middlesex chick, y'know? Like this cute little blonde that'll get down and dirty with the guys. Like Smurfette does.
Sean Smith: [nods agreement] Hmm.
Donnie: Smurfette doesn't fuck.
Ronald Fisher: That's bullshit. Smurfette fucks all the other Smurfs. Why do you think Papa Smurf made her? It's because all the other Smurfs were getting too horny.
Sean Smith: No, no, no, not Vanity. I heard he was a homosexual.
Ronald Fisher: Okay well you know what then, she fucks them while Vanity watches, okay?
Sean Smith: Well what about Papa Smurf? I mean, he must get into all the action.
Ronald Fisher: Yeah. What he does: He films the gangbang, later on...he beats off to the tape.
Donnie: [earnestly] First of all: Papa Smurf didn't create Smurfette - Gargamel did! She was sent in as Gargamel's evil spy with the intention of destroying the Smurf village. But the overwhelming goodness of the Smurf way of life transformed her. And as for the whole gangbang scenario - Huh! I - it just couldn't happen. Smurfs are asexual, th-they don't even have... reproductive organs under those little... white... pants. That's what's so illogical, y'know, about being a Smurf. Y'know what's the point of living... if you don't have a dick?
Sean Smith: [sighs] Dammit, Donnie, wh-why you gotta get so smart on us?

[Donnie tries to kiss Gretchen and she pulls away.]
Donnie: Well I-I, sorry I...
Gretchen: Donnie wait...
Donnie: I like you a lot...
Gretchen: I just want it to be... at a time when... it...
Donnie: When what?
Gretchen: When it reminds me just...
Donnie: When it reminds you of how beautiful the world can be?
Gretchen: Yeah... [turns her head] and right now there's some fat guy over there staring at us.

Donnie Darko: Why do you wear that stupid bunny suit?
Frank: Why are you wearing that stupid man suit?

Dr. Lillian Thurman: Do you feel alone right now?
Donnie: I... I don't know... I mean, I'd like to believe that I'm not, but I just... I've just never seen any proof, so I... I just don't debate it anymore. You know, it's like I could spend my whole life debating it over and over again, weighting the pro's and con's and in the end, I still wouldn't have any proof, so I just... I just don't debate it anymore. Heh, it's absurd...
Dr. Thurman: The search for God is absurd?
Donnie: It is if everyone dies alone.
Dr. Thurman: Does that scare you?
Donnie: I don't wanna be alone.

Taglines

  • Life is one long insane trip. Some people just have better directions.
  • You can never go too far.
  • What would you do if you knew the future?
  • Be Afraid of the Dark
  • Dark. Darker. Darko.
  • Why are you wearing that stupid man suit?
  • Why are you looking at me?
  • The only way to unwind the future is to follow the path.
  • Cellar Door.

Cast

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

Simple English

Donnie Darko is a dramatic movie released in 2001. It was written and directed by Richard Kelly. A sequel, called S. Darko, will be released in 2009.

The movie did not earn much money when it was first shown in theaters, but it became much more popular when it came out on DVD. On DVD, the movie is very popular in the United Kingdom[needs proof].

Cast members

  • Jake Gyllenhaal as Donald J. "Donnie" Darko
  • Jena Malone as Gretchen Ross
  • James Duval as Frank
  • Maggie Gyllenhaal as Elizabeth Darko
  • Mary McDonnell as Rose Darko
  • Holmes Osborne as Eddie Darko
  • Katharine Ross as Dr. Lilian Thurman
  • Drew Barrymore as Karen Pomeroy
  • Noah Wyle as Dr. Kenneth Monnitoff
  • Patrick Swayze as Jim Cunningham
  • Daveigh Chase as Samantha Darko
  • Beth Grant as Kitty Farmer
  • Patience Cleveland as Roberta Sparrow ("Grandma Death")
  • Jolene Purdy as Cherita Chen
  • Jerry Trainor as Lanky Kid








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message