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The dorsal attention network (DAN) is one of two sensory orienting systems in the human brain, the other being the ventral attention network.[1] It is involved in voluntary (top-down) orienting and shows activity increases after presentation of cues indicating where, when, or to what subjects should direct their attention. The dorsal attention network is bilateral and includes the intraparietal sulcus and the junction of the precentral and superior frontal sulcus (frontal eye fields) in each hemisphere.[2]

References

  1. ^ Fox MD, Snyder AZ, Vincent JL, Corbetta M, Van Essen DC, Raichle ME (2005). "The human brain is intrinsically organized into dynamic, anticorrelated functional networks". Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 102 (27): 9673–8. doi:10.1073/pnas.0504136102. PMID 15976020. http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/102/27/9673.  
  2. ^ Fox, M.D., Corbetta, M., Snyder, A.Z., Vincent, J.L., & Raichle, M.E. (2006). Spontaneous neuronal activity distinguishes human dorsal and ventral attention systems. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 103, 10046-10051.

The dorsal attention network (DAN) is one of two sensory orienting systems in the human brain, the other being the ventral attention network.[1] It is involved in voluntary (top-down) orienting and shows activity increases after presentation of cues indicating where, when, or to what subjects should direct their attention. The dorsal attention network is bilateral and includes the intraparietal sulcus and the junction of the precentral and superior frontal sulcus (frontal eye fields) in each hemisphere.[2]

References

  1. ^ Fox MD, Snyder AZ, Vincent JL, Corbetta M, Van Essen DC, Raichle ME (2005). "The human brain is intrinsically organized into dynamic, anticorrelated functional networks". Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 102 (27): 9673–8. doi:10.1073/pnas.0504136102. PMID 15976020. PMC 1157105. http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/102/27/9673. 
  2. ^ Fox, M.D., Corbetta, M., Snyder, A.Z., Vincent, J.L., & Raichle, M.E. (2006). Spontaneous neuronal activity distinguishes human dorsal and ventral attention systems. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 103, 10046-10051.

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