Douglas County, Georgia: Wikis

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Douglas County, Georgia
Seal of Douglas County, Georgia
Map of Georgia highlighting Douglas County
Location in the state of Georgia
Map of the U.S. highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Seat Douglasville
Largest city Douglasville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

200 sq mi (518 km²)
199 sq mi (515 km²)
1 sq mi (3 km²), 0.48%
PopulationEst.
 - (2006)
 - Density

119,557
462/sq mi (179/km²)
Founded 1870
Congressional districts 3rd, 13th
USA-Georgia-Douglasville County Courthouse.jpg
Douglas County courthouse in Douglasville, Georgia
Website www.douglascountygeorgia.com

Douglas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of 2000, the population was 92,174. The 2007 Census Estimate shows a population of 124,495.[1] The county seat is Douglasville.[2]

Douglas County is included in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

Georgia Historical Marker Script

This county, created by Act of the Legislature October 1, 1870, is named for Stephen A. Douglas, the "Little Giant," a Vermonter who was Congressman from Illinois 1843 to '47, Senator from '47 to '61, and Democratic candidate for President in 1860 on the ticket with gov. Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia, for Vice President. Among the first County Officers were: sheriff T.H. Sellman, Clerk of Superior Court A.L. Gorman, Ordinary Wm. Hindman, Tax Receiver Jno. M. James, Tax Collector M.D. Watkins, Treasurer C.P. Bower, Surveyor John M. Hughey.

Name

Formed soon after the end of the US Civil War, Douglas County was originally named by the reconstruction legislature after Frederick Douglass, the Civil War-era abolitionist; however, the official honoree was later changed to Stephen A. Douglas, an Illinois senator and the Democratic opponent of Abraham Lincoln in the presidential election of 1860.

County Seat

The Oct. 17, 1870 act creating Douglas County provided that on the first Monday in November 1870, voters of the new county would elect county officers and also by ballot would select the site of the county seat. In the election, some voters chose a site near the center of the county, but a larger number voted for several different named sites (which may have been different names for the settlement known as "Skinned Chestnut" or "Skin(t) Chestnut"--the early name of Douglasville). Thinking that the majority of voters had intended Skinned Chestnut, the courthouse commissioners chose this site as county seat and proceeded to sell lots and build a courthouse. However, a group of citizens filed suit against the commissioners. The case ultimately went to the Supreme Court of Georgia, which ruled against the commissioners. However, both sides agreed to postpone further action until the route of the Georgia Western Railroad through Douglas County was determined. To clear up the matter, the General Assembly enacted legislation on Feb. 28, 1874, directing that an election be held on Apr. 7, 1874, to determine the location of the county seat—but with the provision that the site be located on the Georgia Western Railroad. In the election, voters confirmed Douglasville as the county seat. On Feb. 25, 1875, the General Assembly incorporated Douglasville.

Geography

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Adjacent counties

Area

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 200 square miles (519 km²), of which, 199 square miles (516 km²) of it is land and 1 square miles (2 km²) of it (0.48%) is water.

Bodies of Water

  • The Chattahoochee River borders the County to the East.
  • Sweetwater Creek runs in the eastern side of the county in the Lithia Springs Area.
  • George Sparks Reservoir makes its home at Sweetwater Creek State Park.
  • The Dog River is a small, almost creek like river in the western side of Douglas county and travels south and eastward until it ends at the Dog River Reservoir in the Southern part of the county.
  • The Dog River Reservoir is Douglas County's main source of drinking water, and also a private lake for residents of the county.

Major highways

Secondary Major Routes

  • Lee Road: Runs through the eastern portion of the county in the Lithia Springs area. The road intersects I-20, begins at Fairburn Road (State Highway 92) in the south and terminates at S. Sweetwater Rd north of I-20.
  • Post Road: Runs through the western portion of Douglas County through the Winston area. The road begins at the southern border with Carroll County, and runs north, intersects I-20 and ends at Bankhead Highway (US Route 78).
  • Chapel Hill Road: begins at I-20 (road continues north as Campbellton St.) and runs south to Dorsett Shoals Road, ending at SR 166.
  • Douglas Boulevard runs from Chapel Hill Rd. at I-20 to SR 5 (Bill Arp Rd.), and from there to Bright Star Road. This road passes Douglasville's Arbor Place Mall.
  • Kings Highway runs south from SR 5 to Big A Road, and is host to many residential developments.
  • Pope Road runs south, southeast looping from the Midway area of Fairburn Rd.(SR 92) and ends at Annewakee Rd.
  • Annewakee Road runs south from Chapel Hill Rd. at Dorsett Shoals Rd. and ending at Fairburn Rd.(SR 92) and Pope Rd.
  • Dorsett Shoals Road runs west from Chapel Hill Rd. at Annewakee Rd. to SR 5.
  • Capps Ferry Road (a future state route) runs from the end of South Fulton Parkway to S.R. 166 connecting southern Douglas County to Atlanta.

Parks

  • Sweetwater Creek State Park is host to the ruins of a Civil War-era mill destroyed in General Sherman's campaign through Georgia.
  • Hunter Park is located within the city limits of Douglasville, and it is home to the majority of the sports events held in Douglas County. It's home to the Douglas County Boys and Girls Club.
  • Deer Lick Park is located in the northeast corner of the county and is the third largest park in the county. It is also home to sporting events.
  • Woodrow Wilson Park and Lithia Springs Girls Ball Field are located in Lithia Springs next to Sweeer Creek. The ball field has flooded during heavy rain storms.
  • Boundary Waters Aquatic Center Opened in July 2005 in the Southeastern section of the County, and it is home to the Douglas County swim team, the Stingrays. The Center also provides aquatic therapy and swim lessons to the county's citizens for a low fee. Residents outside the county can use the center as well for a slightly higher fee.

Other parks in the county include:

  • Post Road Park
  • Clinton Nature Preserve
  • Bill Arp Park
  • Fairplay Park
  • Winston Park
  • Mount Carmel Ball Field
  • Dog River Park/Reservoir

Elevation

Douglas County's elevation above sea level ranges as low as 740 feet (at the Chattahoochee River) to as high as 1,340 feet (410 m); one of the county's highest elevation points lies inside the city of Douglasville. Andy Mountain, between Villa Rica and Winston - west of Douglasville along Bankhead Highway, has the highest elevation in Douglas County, at 1,340 feet (410 m). Two other elevated summits are located in the county, known as Cedar Mountain (1,257 ft), and Pine Mountain (1,180 ft).

Douglas County sits in Georgia's Piedmont region, which makes its elevation vary due to many rolling hills that Douglas County sits on near the tail end of the Appalachian Mountains. There are no high mountain peaks in Douglas County, just a range of ridges, hills and valleys.

A tornado touched down in the city of Douglasville on March 7, 2008 damaging many homes and ripping one home in half in the Brookmont subdivision on Chapel Hill Road. Arbor Place Mall also reported broken windows from the storm. The tornado also damaged the Chapel Hill Kroger grocery store and threw a heavy air conditioning unit onto cars below. There was only one injury reported from the storm.

Another tornado touched down in Douglas County on May 11, 2008 "The Mother's Day Tornado". The EF2 tornado caused damage all over the county. The tornado touched down in the Fairplay area and moved through the rest of the county. The tornado packing wind speeds up to 110 mph (180 km/h) downed many trees and damaged many homes in the county. A gas station in Douglasville was destroyed by the storm with the large roof being thrown onto the street. No injuries or deaths were reported. The governor of Georgia declared a state of emergecy for Douglas County and many other counties in the state on May 12, 2008. This is the first time in history that two tornadoes have touched down in Douglas County in the same year.

On September 21, 2009 Douglas County was devastated by the floods in Georgia. Over a foot of rain fell in one night causing many roads to be destroyed and many homes a total loss. The county was later declared a disaster area, and the governor of Georgia declared a state of emergency.

Known peaks in Douglas County

  • Andy Mountain - 1,340 feet (410 m)
  • Cedar Mountain - 1,257 feet (383 m)
  • Winston - 1,221 feet (372 m)
  • Downtown Douglasville - 1,209 feet (369 m)
  • Beulah - 1,184 feet (361 m)
  • Pine Mountain - 1,180 feet (360 m)
  • White City - 1,177 feet (359 m)
  • Fairplay - 1,170 feet (360 m)
  • Wellstar Douglas Hospital - 1,120 feet (340 m)
  • Stewart Mill Landing - 1,105 feet (337 m)
  • Bill Arp - 1,104 feet (336 m)
  • Midway - 1,080 feet (330 m)
  • Hannah - 1,077 feet (328 m)
  • McWhorter - 1,067 feet (325 m)
  • Lithia Springs - 1,043 feet (318 m)
  • Villa Rica - 1,040 feet (320 m)
  • Chapel Hill - 966 feet (294 m)
  • Groovers Lake - 905 feet (276 m)
  • Phillips Mill - 900 feet (270 m)
  • Fouts Mill - 790 feet (240 m)

Local Media

The newspaper that serves the Douglas County area is the Douglas County Sentinel, a paper that circulates Tuesday-Sunday, with its largest publication on Sunday. The paper has been in circulation since 1902.

The county also has a secondary paper that circulates on Wednesday, the Douglas Neighbor, a paper that is run by the publisher of the Marietta Daily Journal. This paper is delivered free of charge.

The county also has a magazine called Chapel Hill News & Views that delivers to 40,000 homes and businesses ranging from Villa Rica to Lithia Springs and everywhere in between. It also includes a local yellow pages.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution also serves readers of Douglas County, seven days a week, with its largest paper on Sunday.

Television

Douglas County is served by the Atlanta television market, but has a small information TV station on cable, DCTV 23. The station broadcasts board meetings and special events, classified job listings, and three original shows, Gesundheit, Douglas County Living, and Insights.

Douglas County Public1 T.V. sports personality Bryan Allen is well known locally for his fantasy football prognostication. He was celebrated as FFL Champion in 2001.

Government

County Courthouse

Most Government offices in the county are located at the Douglas County Courthouse complex, about 1-mile (1.6 km) south of the downtown area of Douglasville. The exception being the Douglas County Board of Education and the Douglas County Chamber of Commerce, the former located outside of Douglasville next to Hunter Park, the latter located in Downtown Douglasville.

The County Courthouse was constructed in 1997-98 and opened in 1998 after the county services needed a new courthouse for the ever growing and changing county. The services prior to the opening were scattered all over downtown Douglasville in 7-8 offices. The old Douglas County courthouse, built in 1956, remains in downtown and is now used as a museum and a satellite school for the University of West Georgia.

Douglas County is governed by the Douglas County Board of Commissions and its Chairman, Tom Worthan (R), elected in 2004. The remaining commissioners are representatives from Douglas County's four districts.

In 2004, Douglas County voted in the majority for President George W. Bush (Republican), as well as the candidate for U.S. Senate, Johnny Isakson (Republican).

Law Enforcement

Douglas County law enforcement is handled by the Douglas County Sheriffs Department, run by Sheriff Phil Miller elected in 2000. Inside Douglasville City Limits, law enforcement is handled by the Douglasville Police Department under Chief Chris Womack.

Schools

The seal of the Douglas County School System http://www.douglas.k12.ga.us/

Douglas County is home to 19 Elementary Schools, 7 Middle Schools, 5 High Schools, Crossroads Night school, A Performance Learning Center and numerous private academies. Schools are run by the Douglas County School System [2].

Secondary Schools

Douglas County's 5 High Schools are:

Douglas County's 8 Middle Schools are:

  • Chapel Hill Middle School
  • Chesnut Log Middle School
  • Factory Shoals Middle School
  • Fairplay Middle School
  • Mason Creek Middle School
  • Stewart Middle School
  • Turner Middle School
  • Yeager Middle School

Douglas County's 20 Elementary Schools are:

  • Annette Winn Elementary
  • Arbor Station Elementary
  • Beulah Elementary
  • Burnett Elementary
  • Bill Arp Elementary
  • Bright Star Elementary
  • Chapel Hill Elementary
  • Dorsett Shoals Elementary
  • Eastside Elementary
  • Factory Shoals Elementary
  • Holly Springs Elementary
  • Lithia Springs Elementary
  • Mason Creek Elementary
  • Mirror Lake Elementary
  • Mt Carmel Elementary
  • New Manchester Elementary
  • North Douglas Elementary
  • South Douglas Elementary
  • Sweetwater Elementary
  • Winston Elementary

Technical School

Douglas County is home to a campus for the West Georgia Technical College, (formerly West Central Technical College), whose main campus is located in Waco, GA. The school serves those seeking higher education in technical fields, as well as adult education and GED classes in Douglas County. The county also is home to Tanner Technical Institute and Strayer University

Demographics

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 92,174 people, 32,822 households, and 24,911 families residing in the county. The population density was 462 people per square mile (179/km²). There were 34,825 housing units at an average density of 175 per square mile (67/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 77.28% White, 18.51% Black or African American, 0.35% Native American, 1.17% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.22% from other races, and 1.44% from two or more races. 2.86% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 32,822 households out of which 38.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.90% were married couples living together, 12.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.10% were non-families. 18.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the county the population was spread out with 27.60% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 33.50% from 25 to 44, 22.40% from 45 to 64, and 7.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 96.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $50,108, and the median income for a family was $54,082. Males had a median income of $38,204 versus $28,475 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,172. About 5.70% of families and 7.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.90% of those under age 18 and 7.50% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

Unincorporated Communities

  • Lithia Springs (Unincorporated as of 2001.)
  • Beulah
  • Bill Arp
  • Chapel Hill
  • Cracker
  • Fairplay
  • Fouts Mill
  • Hannah
  • McWhorter
  • Midway
  • Phillips Mill
  • White City
  • Winston

Subdivision Names

  • Amber Creek
  • Amber Forest
  • Anneewakee Falls
  • Anneewakee Trails
  • Applewood
  • Arbor Station
  • Ashton Heights
  • Ashworth
  • Autumn Glen
  • Bear Creek
  • Bomar Road
  • Bright Star Estates
  • Brookmont
  • Brookfield Village
  • Captain's Quarters
  • Carmel Chase
  • Cedar Terrace
  • Chapel Hills Golf and Country Club
  • Chaperral ridge
  • Chestnut Corners
  • Chestnut Log
  • Del Ridge
  • Dorsett Shoals Road
  • Douglas Ridge
  • Elk Run
  • Executive Heights
  • Fairways
  • Gregory Heights
  • Greythorne
  • Hampton Chase
  • Holly Springs
  • Home Ridge Apts.
  • Hunter's Ridge
  • Kingswood Shoals
  • Knots Landing
  • Lake Monroe
  • Laurel Wood
  • Leah Lane
  • Longview Estates
  • Maroney Mill Road
  • McKinney Acres
  • Midway Station
  • Mirror Lake
  • Montage Manor
  • Nations Corner
  • Orchard Point
  • Oakridge
  • Parkside Manor
  • Parkside Village
  • Peach Orchard
  • Pilgrim's Manor
  • Pope Road
  • Punkintown Road
  • Quail's Nest
  • Riley Estates
  • Rosewood
  • River Pointe Overlook
  • Rolling Hills Estates
  • Shadow Wood
  • Shallowford
  • Slater Mill
  • Slater Mill Plantation
  • South Douglas
  • Southern Oaks
  • Southern Pines
  • Springdale Estates
  • Stewarts Mill
  • Stonegate
  • Sumter West
  • Sweetwater Bluff
  • Timber Ridge
  • Trail Creek
  • Tributary at New Manchester
  • The Village
  • Riverbanks
  • Warren Road
  • West Moreland
  • West River Place
  • Woodlands
  • Weatherstone
  • Willows North
  • Yancey Road
  • Yeager Road

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links

Coordinates: 33°42′N 84°46′W / 33.70°N 84.77°W / 33.70; -84.77


Genealogy

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Douglas County, Georgia
File:Douglas County ga seal.png
Map
File:Map of Georgia highlighting Douglas County.png
Location in the state of Georgia
Map of the USA highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1870
Seat Douglasville
Largest City Douglasville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 0.48%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2006)
 - Density

119557
Website: www.douglascountygeorgia.com

Douglas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of 2000, the population was 92,174. The 2006 Census Estimate shows a population of 119,557 [1]. The county seat is Douglasville6.

Douglas County is included in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta [[Metropolitan Statistical Area]

Contents

History

Georgia Historical Marker Script

This county, created by Act of the Legislature October 1, 1870, is named for Stephen A. Douglas, the "Little Giant," a Vermonter who was Congressman from Illinois 1843 to '47, Senator from '47 to '61, and Democratic candidate for President in 1860 on the ticket with gov. Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia, for Vice President. Among the first County Officers were: sheriff T.H. Sellman, Clerk of Superior Court A.L. Gorman, Ordinary Wm. Hindman, Tax Receiver Jno. M. James, Tax Collector M.D. Watkins, Treasurer C.P. Bower, Surveyor John M. Hughey.

Name

Formed soon after the end of the US Civil War, Douglas County was originally named by the reconstruction legislature after Frederick Douglass, the Civil War-era abolitionist; however, the official honoree was later changed to Stephen A. Douglas, an Illinois senator and the Democratic opponent of Abraham Lincoln in the presidential election of 1860.

County Seat

The Oct. 17, 1870 act creating Douglas County provided that on the first Monday in November 1870, voters of the new county would elect county officers and also by ballot would select the site of the county seat. In the election, some voters chose a site near the center of the county, but a larger number voted for several different named sites (which may have been different names for the settlement known as "Skinned Chestnut" or "Skin(t) Chestnut"--the early name of Douglasville). Thinking that the majority of voters had intended Skinned Chestnut, the courthouse commissioners chose this site as county seat and proceeded to sell lots and build a courthouse. However, a group of citizens filed suit against the commissioners. The case ultimately went to the Supreme Court of Georgia, which ruled against the commissioners. However, both sides agreed to postpone further action until the route of the Georgia Western Railroad through Douglas County was determined. To clear up the matter, the General Assembly enacted legislation on Feb. 28, 1874, directing that an election be held on Apr. 7, 1874, to determine the location of the county seat--but with the provision that the site be located on the Georgia Western Railroad. In the election, voters confirmed Douglasville as the county seat. On Feb. 25, 1875, the General Assembly incorporated Douglasville.

Geography

Adjacent Counties

Area

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 519 km² (200 sq mi). 516 km² (199 sq mi) of it is land and 2 km² (1 sq mi) of it (0.48%) is water.

Bodies of Water

  • The Chattahoochee River borders the County to the East.
  • Sweetwater Creek runs in the eastern side of the county in the Lithia Springs Area.
  • George Sparks Reservoir makes its home at Sweetwater Creek State Park.
  • The Dog River is a small, almost creek like river in the western side of Douglas county and travels south and eastward until it ends at the Dog River Reservoir in the Southern part of the county.
  • The Dog River Reservoir is Douglas County's main source of drinking water, and also a private lake for residents of the county.

Major Highways

Secondary Major Routes

  • Lee Road: Runs through the eastern portion of the county in the Lithia Springs area. The roads intersect I-20, begins at Fairburn Road (State Highway 92) to the south and terminates at Sweetwater Rd north of I-20.
  • Post Road: Runs through the western portion of Douglas County through the Winston area. The Road begins at the southern border with Carroll County, and runs north, intersects I-20 and ends at Bankhead Highway (US Route 78).
  • Chapel Hill Road begins at I-20 and runs south to Dorsett Shoals Road and farther south, ending at SR 166.
  • Douglas Boulevard runs from Chapel Hill Rd. at I-20 to SR 5(Bill Arp Rd.), and from there to Bright Star Road. This road passes Douglasville's Arbor Place Mall.
  • Kings Highway runs south from SR 5 to Big A Road, and is host to many residential developments.
  • Pope Road runs south, southeast looping from the Midway area of Fairburn Rd.(SR 92) and ends at Annewakee Rd.
  • Annewakee Road runs south from Chapel Hill Rd. at Dorsett Shoals Rd. and ending at Fairburn Rd.(SR 92) and Pope Rd.
  • Dorsett Shoals Road runs west from Chapel Hill Rd. at Annewakee Rd. to SR 5.
  • Capps Ferry Road (a future state route) runs from the end of South Fulton Parkway to S.R. 166 connecting southern Douglas County to Atlanta.

Parks

  • Sweetwater Creek State Park is host to the ruins of a Civil War-era mill destroyed in General Sherman's campaign through Georgia.
  • Hunter Park is located within the city limits of Douglasville, and it is home to the majority of the sports events held in Douglas County. It's home to the Douglas County Boys and Girls Club.
  • Deer Lick Park is located in the northeast corner of the county and is the third largest park in the county. It is also home to sporting events.
  • Woodrow Wilson Park and Lithia Springs Girls Ball Field are located in Lithia Springs next to Sweetwater Creek. The ball field has flooded during heavy rain storms.
  • Boundary Waters Aquatic Center Opened in July of 2005 in the Southeastern section of the County, and it is home to the Douglas County swim team, the Stingrays. The Center also provides aquatic therapy and swim lessons to the county's citizens for a low fee. Residents outside the county can use the center as well for a slightly higher fee.

Other parks in the county include:

  • Post Road Park
  • Clinton Nature Preserve
  • Bill Arp Park
  • Fairplay Park
  • Winston Park
  • Mount Carmel Ball Field
  • Dog River Park/Reservoir

Elevation

Douglas County's elevation above sea level ranges as low as 740 feet (at the Chattahoochee River) to as high as 1,340 feet; one of the county's highest elevation points lies inside the city of Douglasville. Andy Mountain, between Villa Rica and Winston - west of Douglasville along Bankhead Highway, has the highest elevation in Douglas County, at 1,340 feet. Two other elevated summits are located in the county, known as Cedar Mountain (1,257 feet), and Pine Mountain (1,180 feet).

Douglas County sits in Georgia's Piedmont region, which makes its elevation vary due to many rolling hills that Douglas County sits on near the tail end of the Appalachian Mountains. There are no high mountain peaks in Douglas County, just a range of ridges, hills and valleys.

Known peaks in Douglas County

  • Andy Mountain - 1,340 feet
  • Cedar Mountain - 1,257 feet
  • Winston - 1,221 feet
  • Downtown Douglasville - 1,209 feet
  • Beulah - 1,184 feet
  • Pine Mountain - 1,180 feet
  • White City - 1,177 feet
  • Fairplay - 1,170 feet
  • Wellstar Douglas Hospital - 1,120 feet
  • Stewart Mill Landing - 1,105 feet
  • Bill Arp - 1,104 feet
  • Midway - 1,080 feet
  • Hannah - 1,077 feet
  • McWhorter - 1,067 feet
  • Lithia Springs - 1,043 feet
  • Villa Rica - 1,040 feet
  • Chapel Hill - 966 feet
  • Austell - 920 feet
  • Groovers Lake - 905 feet
  • Phillips Mill - 900 feet
  • Fouts Mill - 790 feet

Local Media

The Magazine serving Douglas County, Georgia is "The Post Magazine", a Christian magazine that circulates to homes & businesses throughout the county. The Post Magazine has a targeted distribution along with a subscription base for a concentrated readership in Douglas County.

The newspaper that serves the Douglas County area is the Douglas County Sentinel, a paper that circulates Tuesday-Sunday, with its largest publication on Sunday. The paper has been in circulation since 1902.

The county also has a secondary paper that circulates on Wednesday, the Douglas Neighbor, a paper that is run by the publisher of the Marietta Daily Journal. This paper is delivered free of charge.

The county also has a magazine called Chapel Hill News & Views that delivers to 40,000 homes and businesses ranging from Villa Rica to Lithia Springs and everywhere in between. It also includes a local yellow pages.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution also serves readers of Douglas County, seven days a week, with its largest paper on Sunday.

Television

Douglas County is served by the Atlanta television market, but has a small information TV station on cable, DCTV 23. The station broadcasts board meetings and special events, classified job listings, and three original shows, Gesundheit, Douglas County Living, and Insights.

Government

County Courthouse

File:M-8937courthouse.jpg Most Government offices in the county are located at the Douglas County Courthouse complex, about 1 mile south of the downtown area of Douglasville. The exception being the Douglas County Board of Education and the Douglas County Chamber of Commerce, the former located outside of Douglasville next to Hunter Park, the latter located in Downtown Douglasville.

The County Courthouse was constructed in 1997-98 and opened in 1998 after the county services needed a new courthouse for the ever growing and changing county. The services prior to the opening were scattered all over downtown Douglasville in 7-8 offices. The old Douglas County courthouse, built in 1956, remains in downtown and is now used as a museum and a satellite school for the University of West Georgia.

Douglas County is Governed by the Douglas County Board of Commissions and its Chairman, Tom Worthan (R), elected in 2004. The remaining commissioners are representatives from Douglas County's four districts.

In 2004, Douglas County voted in the majority for President George W. Bush (Republican), as well as the candidate for U.S. Senate, Johnny Isakson (Republican).

Law Enforcement

Douglas County law enforcement is handled by the Douglas County Sheriffs Department, run by Sheriff Phil Miller elected in 2000. Inside Douglasville City Limits, law enforcement is handled by the Douglasville Police Department under Chief Joe Whisenant.

Schools

File:Douglas County School System.gif Douglas County is home to 19 Elementary Schools, 7 Middle Schools, 4 High Schools, Crossroads Night school, A Performance Learning Center and numerous private academies. Schools are run by the Douglas County School System.

Secondary Schools

Douglas County's 4 High Schools are:

  • Alexander High School (Mascot: Cougars)
  • Douglas County Comprehensive High School (Mascot: Tigers)
  • Chapel Hill High School (Mascot: Panthers)
  • Lithia Springs Comprehensive High School (Mascot: Lions)

Douglas County's 7 Middle Schools are:

  • Fairplay Middle School
  • Chesnut Log Middle School
  • Chapel Hill Middle School
  • Turner Middle School
  • Stewart Middle School
  • Yeager Middle School
  • Factory Shoals Middle School

Douglas County's 19 Elementary Schools are:

  • Annette Winn Elementary
  • Arbor Station Elementary
  • Beulah Elementary
  • Burnett Elementary
  • Bill Arp Elementary
  • Bright Star Elementary
  • Chapel Hill Elementary
  • Dorsett Shoals Elementary
  • Eastside Elementary
  • Factory Shoals Elementary
  • Holly Springs Elementary
  • Lithia Springs Elementary
  • Mirror Lake Elementary
  • Mt Carmel Elementary
  • New Manchester Elementary
  • North Douglas Elementary
  • South Douglas Elementary
  • Sweetwater Elementary
  • Winston Elementary

Technical School

Douglas County is home to a campus for the West Central Technical College, whose main campus is located in Carrollton. The school serves those seeking higher education in technical fields, as well as adult education and GED classes in Douglas County.

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 92,174 people, 32,822 households, and 24,911 families residing in the county. The population density was 179/km² (462/sq mi). There were 34,825 housing units at an average density of 67/km² (175/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 77.28% White, 18.51% Black or African American, 0.35% Native American, 1.17% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.22% from other races, and 1.44% from two or more races. 2.86% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 32,822 households out of which 38.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.90% were married couples living together, 12.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.10% were non-families. 18.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the county the population was spread out with 27.60% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 33.50% from 25 to 44, 22.40% from 45 to 64, and 7.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 96.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $50,108, and the median income for a family was $54,082. Males had a median income of $38,204 versus $28,475 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,172. About 5.70% of families and 7.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.90% of those under age 18 and 7.50% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

Unincorporated Communities

  • Lithia Springs (Unincorporated as of 2001.)
  • Beulah
  • Bill Arp
  • Chapel Hill
  • Cracker
  • Fairplay
  • Fouts Mill
  • Hannah
  • McWhorter
  • Midway
  • Phillips Mill
  • White City
  • Winston

Subdivision Names

  • Amber Forest
  • Anneewakee Falls
  • Anneewakee Trails
  • Applewood
  • Arbor Station
  • Ashton Heights
  • Autumn Glen
  • Bear Creek
  • Bomar Road
  • Brookmont
  • Brookfield Village
  • Carmel Chase
  • Cedar Terrace
  • Chapel Hills Golf and Country Club
  • Chestnut Log
  • Dorsett Shoals Road
  • Elk Run
  • Fairfield
  • Fairways
  • Greythorne
  • Hampton Chase
  • Holly Springs
  • Lake Monroe
  • Laurel Wood
  • Laura Lane
  • Leah Lane
  • Maroney Mill Road
  • Midway Station
  • Mirror Lake
  • Montage Manor
  • Nations Corner
  • Orchard Point
  • Oakridge
  • Peach Orchard
  • Pilgrim's Manor
  • Pope Road
  • Punkintown Road
  • Rosewood
  • River Pointe Overlook
  • Shadow Wood
  • Shallowford
  • Slater Mill
  • Slater Mill Plantation
  • Southern Pines
  • Stewarts Mill
  • Stonegate
  • Sumter West
  • Sweetwater Bluff
  • Timber Ridge
  • Tributary
  • The Village
  • Riverbanks
  • Warren Road
  • West Moreland
  • Woodlands
  • Weatherstone
  • Yancey Road
  • Yeager Road

References

External links

Coordinates: 33°42′N 84°46′W / 33.70, -84.77

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Douglas County, Georgia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Douglas County, GeorgiaRDF feed
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Georgia (U.S. state)  +
Short name Douglas County  +

This article uses material from the "Douglas County, Georgia" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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