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Drake's 1587 expedition
Part of the Anglo–Spanish War
AtaqueDrakes.jpg
Drake's map of his attack on Cadiz
Date 12 April - 6 July 1587[1]
Location Bay of Cádiz, Algarve, Lisbon and the Azores
Result English victory
Belligerents
Flag of New Spain.svg Spanish Empire

Flag Portugal (1578).svg Kingdom of Portugal

Flag of England.svg England
Commanders
Pérez de Guzmán (Cádiz)
Álvaro de Bazán (Lisbon)
Francis Drake
Casualties and losses
37 naval and merchant vessels destroyed[citation needed]

Drake's 1587 expedition was a military expedition led by the English privateer Francis Drake against the Spanish naval forces being prepared in the bay of Cadiz by Philip II of Spain for the invasion of England. It occurred in April and May 1587 and saw the English destroy a large part of the fleet, land in the Algarve, sack various fortresses along the Portuguese coast right up to Lisbon and capture a treasure-laden Spanish fleet on its way back from the Azores. Drake referred to his raid as the "singeing of the King of Spain's beard".

Contents

Background

England joined the Eighty Years' War on the side of the Dutch Protestant United Provinces, who had declared their independence from Spain. Philip II planned an invasion of England, Queen Elizabeth and her government had become convinced that a war with Spain was inevitable, and so Drake was sent out from Plymouth, on April 12, 1587.

Drake's attack

Drake appeared before Cadiz on April 29th, and late in the afternoon of that day he sailed into the harbor, surprising the defenders and throwing the Spanish land and naval forces there into a panic.[citation needed] All the remainder of the day, and all the next day, Drake cannonaded, plundered and burned. During the next month he sailed back and forth on the Iberian coasts between Lisbon and Cape St. Vincent, capturing ships and destroying supplies being sent to Lisbon for the Spanish Armada. Among these supplies were barrel staves to the quantity of 1600-1700 tons, according to Drake's own estimate, sufficient to make barrels for 25-30,000 tons of provisions and water.[citation needed]

Aftermath

Drake's 1587 raids on Cádiz and A Coruña delayed the sailing of the Spanish Armada. In all Drake destroyed 37 naval and merchant vessels with only small losses on his side.[citation needed] The cost to the Spanish authorities was nearly 30,000 crowns but more damaging in the long run to the Spanish was Drake's capture or destruction of around 1600 tons of wood for barrel making, a loss that meant newer wood was used for the Armada’s stores the following year – indeed the raid almost certainly delayed the Armada by a year - with catastrophic consequences for much of the supplies this new wood eventually contained, and thus a serious reduction in effectiveness of the Spanish Armada when it finally sailed in 1588.[citation needed]

Popular culture

It is portrayed in the 1935 film Drake of England.

References

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Drake's 1587 expedition
Part of the Anglo–Spanish War
Date 12 April - 6 July 1587[1]
Location Bay of Cádiz, Algarve, Lisbon and the Azores
Result Decisive English victory
Belligerents
Spanish Empire
Kingdom of Portugal
England
Commanders
Pérez de Guzmán (Cádiz)
Álvaro de Bazán (Lisbon)
Francis Drake

Drake's 1587 expedition was a military expedition led by the English privateer Francis Drake against the Spanish naval forces being prepared in the bay of Cadiz by Philip II of Spain for the invasion of England. It occurred in April and May 1587 and saw the English destroy a large part of the fleet, land in the Algarve, sack various fortresses along the Portuguese coast right up to Lisbon and capture a treasure-laden Spanish fleet on its way back from the Azores. Drake reffered to his raid as the "singeing of the King of Spain's beard".

Popular Culture

It is portrayed in the 1935 film Drake of England.

References

  1. New Style



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