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A dream-guide is a Spirit guide active during dreams, particular during fully-lucid dreams. On the "scale of lucidity", "full" lucidity requires that all dream personnel, not just the dream-ego, be lucid." In this case, "another dream character not only becomes lucid before the dream-ego, he also possesses a higher degree of lucidity than the dream-ego later achieves." An example of this (beginning where during the dream the dreamer is as yet unaware of the fact of dreaming) :- The dream-guide "told me, 'There is no reason to worry because you are dreaming!' I did not believe him and ... he told me ... that I would be able to see that we were part of a dream. Only after this ... was I convinced that I was in a dream. Then I said that I would never have found out by myself that I was dreaming. He replied that he knew that and that was why he was there."[1] "A dream guide performs ... purposes in lucid dreams :

  • The presence of the Guide is itself a dream sign that can make you aware that you are dreaming."

In such a lucid dream, "The Guide introduced himself and explained his function." [2]

Generally, the stage of capacity of a dream-guide to put in such an appearance so as to inform the unwitting dreamer of the fact that this is a dream; must be preceded by the stage (achieved in some previous nights) of the witting dreamer informing (in a manner acceptable, or course, to themselves) prospective dream-guides of the fact of this being a dream, and securing their agreement to this fact. This stage will in turn have quite likely have been preceded by a still earlier stage in which the witting dreamer will have endeavored to secure the agreement, by prospective dream-guides, of the fact of this being a dream, but having been rebuffed by them (the rebuff have been due merely to the statement's not having been made in a style suitable to their literary fashion, which can be quite punctilious).

References

  1. ^ Anthony Shafton : Dream Reader. Albany : State University of New York Press, 1995. p. 444
  2. ^ Your Lucid Dream Guide
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