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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Drongo
Spangled Drongo
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Suborder: Passeri
Family: Dicruridae
Vigors, 1825
Genera

The drongos are a family of small passerine birds of the Old World tropics. They are found in the family Dicruridae, which is sometimes much enlarged to include a number of largely Australasian groups, such as the Australasian fantails, monarchs and paradise flycatchers. The name is originally from the indigenous language of Madagascar, where it refers to local species, but is now used to refer to all members of the family.[1]

Andaman Drongo, Dicrurus andamanensis

The family Dicruridae are believed to be most likely of Indo Malayan origin with a colonization of Africa about 15 million years ago. Dispersal across the Wallace Line into Australasia is estimated to have been more recent, around 6 mya.[2]

These insectivorous birds are found in usually open forests or bush. Most are black or dark grey in colour, sometimes with metallic tints. They have long forked tails, and some Asian species have elaborate tail decorations. They have short legs and sit very upright whilst perched, like a shrike. Racket-tailed Drongos are the mimicry artists among birds. They can mimic the sound of other birds and some animals. They flycatch or take prey from the ground.

Two to four eggs are laid in a nest high in a tree. These are aggressive and fearless birds, given their small size, and drongos will attack much larger species if their nest or young are threatened.

Contents

Species of Dicruridae in taxonomic order

 
Dicruridae

aeneus


 
 
 

paradiseus



annectans



 
 

megarhynchus



bracteatus



 

hottentotus



balicassius






remifer



 
 
 

waldenii


 

aldabranus



forficatus




 
 
 

adsimilis



macrocercus




modestus



 

fuscipennis




 

leucophaeus




 

atripennis



ludwigii





A phylogenetic overview of the family.[2]

References

  1. ^ Lindsey, Terence (1991). Forshaw, Joseph. ed. Encyclopaedia of Animals: Birds. London: Merehurst Press. pp. 223–224. ISBN 1-85391-186-0.  
  2. ^ a b Eric Pasquet, Jean-Marc Pons, Jerome Fuchs, Corinne Cruaud, Vincent Bretagnolle (2007) Evolutionary history and biogeography of the drongos (Dicruridae), a tropical Old World clade of corvoid passerines. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 45:158–167

Other sources

Wannan, Bill (1970), Australian Folklore, Lansdowne Press, ISBN 0-7018-1309-1  .

External links

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