Drop goal: Wikis

  

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A drop goal, also referred to as a dropped goal or field goal, is a method of scoring points in rugby union and rugby league. A drop goal is scored in open play by drop kicking the ball over the crossbar and between the uprights. After the kick, the ball may touch the crossbar or goalposts, but not the ground (i.e. it must be on the full), before it goes over and through. One important difference between the method of scoring a drop goal in rugby union and rugby league arises when the ball has been touched in flight by an opposing player after it has been drop kicked but before it has passed through the goal posts. Such a kick counts as a drop goal in rugby union but not in rugby league.[1]

A drop goal is worth three points in rugby union[2] and one point in rugby league.[1] If the drop goal attempt is successful, play stops and the non-scoring team (the scoring team in rugby union sevens) restarts play with a kick from the centre spot. If the kick is unsuccessful, the offside rules for a kick apply and play continues until a normal stoppage occurs, usually by the kicked ball going dead or into touch. Defenders may tackle the kicker while he is in possession of the ball, or attempt to charge down or block the kick.

Contents

Rugby union

In rugby union, the play is officially called a dropped goal[2] and commonly abbreviated to "drop goal".

Tactical use of the drop goal

At three points in union, the drop goal is relatively valuable and therefore it is not unusual to see it attempted at any point in a match. However teams which believe they are stronger than their opponents in scoring more valuable tries generally do not want to sacrifice a good territorial position by going for a drop goal.

Teams which are in the lead often use the drop-goal to maintain a margin over the opposition of more than seven points, i.e. more than a converted try, the maximum single score possible. They will often do so immediately after their lead has been cut.

Some teams play a strategy of ensuring that they score points every time they get close to their opponents' 22 metre line. If they do not score a try within a certain period of getting there and if their opponents are disciplined and not giving away penalties, they attempt a drop goal.

Sometimes a team defending their try line makes a hurried clearing kick or hack at a loose ball which goes down the centre of the field. In these circumstances the attacking team's fullback will sometimes try a long-range drop goal from there or near the half-way line.

A team often tries a drop goal just before half-time, especially if they think the referee is going to blow the whistle at the next stoppage and they feel their attacking move is about to break down.

The advantage rule for a penalty is also exploited by teams to score a drop-goal. In such a scenario, the referee signals penalty advantage to the attacking team when the location of the infringement is difficult for kicking a penalty goal. If the attackers aren't in a good position to score a try, they may attempt the drop-goal. If they miss they do not lose anything, because they have not gained an advantage, and the referee still gives them the penalty.


Some teams such as the South African Springboks have been notable for use of the drop-goal, while others such as the New Zealand All Blacks seem to spurn it and prefer to run the ball.[3] There is a view that this contributed to the All Blacks, then the world's No 1 ranked team, being knocked out of the 2007 Rugby World Cup, which the Springboks won .[4] (this tournament also featured more kicking than usual)

Notable drop goals in rugby union

A number of quarterfinals and semifinals and two finals in the Rugby World Cup have been decided by dropped goals, in extra time in the case of the finals.

Points value of a drop goal

From time to time suggestions have been made in some quarters of the international rugby community that the number of points for a drop goal should be reduced, or drop goals should be limited or discouraged in other ways.[5] These suggestions have often come from New Zealand and Australia where the use of the drop goal is not so common.[6]

Rugby league

In rugby league, since the reduction of their value from two points to one in the early 1970s, the drop goal's use has largely been in the latter stages of a match (or half) in order to break a deadlock, or for "insurance" points: to extend a lead to more than a converted try, or to reduce a deficit to less than a converted try.

With the introduction of the golden point rule in the Australasian National Rugby League, the field goal is often the first choice option when looking to secure a win.

In other Rugby descendant football codes

The drop-kick field goal is a rare but still legal part of American football and Canadian football, other football codes descended from Rugby football. For example, in the New England Patriots' regular-season finale against the Miami Dolphins on January 1, 2006, Doug Flutie successfully drop kicked a football for an extra point, something that had not been done in a regular-season NFL game since 1941.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Section 6: Scoring" (PDF). The International Laws of the Game and Notes on the Laws. Rugby League International Federation. http://www.therfl.co.uk/~therflc/clientdocs/rugby_laws_book2004.pdf. Retrieved 2009-06-24.  
  2. ^ a b "Law 9: Method of Scoring" (PDF). Laws of the Game. International Rugby Board. 2007. http://www.irb.com/mm/Document/LawsRegs/0/070110LGLAW09red_662.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-12.  
  3. ^ Patrick Gower: "Does NZ have 'droppie-phobia'?". The New Zealand Herald online, 11:33AM Wednesday October 10, 2007.
  4. ^ Patrick Gower: "Where was the droppie?" The New Zealand Herald online, 1:36PM Monday October 08, 2007.
  5. ^ Spiro Zavos: "Time to dock points from drop goals". Rugby Heaven, Tuesday, June 19, 2007.
  6. ^ Andrew Logan: "Limit the drop goal." The Roar, September 28th 2007.

A drop goal, also referred to as a dropped goal or field goal, is a method of scoring points in rugby union and rugby league. A drop goal is scored in open play by drop kicking the ball over the crossbar and between the uprights. After the kick, the ball may touch the crossbar or goalposts, but not the ground (i.e. it must be on the full), before it goes over and through. One important difference between the method of scoring a drop goal in rugby union and rugby league arises when the ball has been touched in flight by an opposing player after it has been drop kicked but before it has passed through the goal posts. Such a kick counts as a drop goal in rugby union but not in rugby league.[1]

A drop goal is worth three points in rugby union[2] and one point in rugby league.[1] If the drop goal attempt is successful, play stops and the non-scoring team (the scoring team in rugby union sevens) restarts play with a kick from the centre spot. If the kick is unsuccessful, the offside rules for a kick apply and play continues until a normal stoppage occurs, usually by the kicked ball going dead or into touch. Defenders may tackle the kicker while he is in possession of the ball, or attempt to charge down or block the kick.

Contents

Rugby union

In rugby union, the play is officially called a dropped goal[2] and commonly abbreviated to "drop goal".

Tactical use of the drop goal

At three points in union, the drop goal is relatively valuable and therefore it is not unusual to see it attempted at any point in a match. However teams which believe they are stronger than their opponents in scoring more valuable tries generally do not want to sacrifice a good territorial position by going for a drop goal.

Teams which are in the lead often use the drop-goal to maintain a margin over the opposition of more than seven points, i.e. more than a converted try, the maximum single score possible. They will often do so immediately after their lead has been cut.

Some teams play a strategy of ensuring that they score points every time they get close to their opponents' 22 metre line. If they do not score a try within a certain period of getting there and if their opponents are disciplined and not giving away penalties, they attempt a drop goal.

Sometimes a team defending their try line makes a hurried clearing kick or hack at a loose ball which goes down the centre of the field. In these circumstances the attacking team's fullback will sometimes try a long-range drop goal from there or near the half-way line. Paul Warwick of Munster is particularly well-known for this.

A team often tries a drop goal just before half-time, especially if they think the referee is going to blow the whistle at the next stoppage and they feel their attacking move is about to break down.

The advantage rule for a penalty is also exploited by teams to score a drop-goal. In such a scenario, the referee signals penalty advantage to the attacking team when the location of the infringement is difficult for kicking a penalty goal. If the attackers aren't in a good position to score a try, they may attempt the drop-goal. If they miss they do not lose anything, because they have not gained an advantage, and the referee still gives them the penalty.

Some teams such as the South African Springboks have been notable for use of the drop-goal, while others such as the New Zealand All Blacks seem to spurn it and prefer to run the ball.[3] There is a view that this contributed to the All Blacks, then the world's No 1 ranked team, being knocked out of the 2007 Rugby World Cup, which the Springboks won .[4] (this tournament also featured more kicking than usual)

Notable drop goals in rugby union

A number of quarterfinals and semifinals and two finals in the Rugby World Cup have been decided by dropped goals, in extra time in the case of the finals.

Points value of a drop goal

From time to time suggestions have been made in some quarters of the international rugby community that the number of points for a drop goal should be reduced, or drop goals should be limited or discouraged in other ways.[5] These suggestions have often come from New Zealand and Australia where the use of the drop goal is not so common.[6]

Rugby league

In rugby league, since the reduction of their value from two points to one in the early 1970s, the drop goal's use has largely been in the latter stages of a match (or half) in order to break a deadlock, or for "insurance" points: to extend a lead to more than a converted try, or to reduce a deficit to less than a converted try.

With the introduction of the golden point rule in the Australasian National Rugby League, the field goal is often the first choice option when looking to secure a win.

In other Rugby descendant football codes

The drop-kick field goal is a rare but still legal part of American football and Canadian football, other football codes descended from Rugby football. For example, in the New England Patriots' regular-season finale against the Miami Dolphins on January 1, 2006, Doug Flutie successfully drop kicked a football for an extra point, something that had not been done in a regular-season NFL game since 1941.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Section 6: Scoring" (PDF). The International Laws of the Game and Notes on the Laws. Rugby League International Federation. http://www.therfl.co.uk/~therflc/clientdocs/rugby_laws_book2004.pdf. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 
  2. ^ a b "Law 9: Method of Scoring" (PDF). Laws of the Game. International Rugby Board. 2007. http://www.irb.com/mm/Document/LawsRegs/0/070110LGLAW09red_662.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-12. 
  3. ^ Patrick Gower: "Does NZ have 'droppie-phobia'?". The New Zealand Herald online, 11:33AM Wednesday October 10, 2007.
  4. ^ Patrick Gower: "Where was the droppie?" The New Zealand Herald online, 1:36PM Monday October 08, 2007.
  5. ^ Spiro Zavos: "Time to dock points from drop goals". Rugby Heaven, Tuesday, June 19, 2007.
  6. ^ Andrew Logan: "Limit the drop goal." The Roar, September 28th 2007.


Simple English

A drop goal, also referred to as a dropped goal or field goal, is a method of scoring points in rugby union and rugby league. A drop goal is scored by drop kicking the ball above the crossbar and between the uprights. A drop goal is worth three points in rugby union and one point in rugby league.








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