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Duke of Grafton: Wikis

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Arms of the Dukes of Grafton.

The title of Duke of Grafton was created in 1675 by Charles II of England for his 2nd illegitimate son by the Duchess of Cleveland, Henry FitzRoy. The most famous duke was probably Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton, who served as Prime Minister in the 1760s.

The Duke of Grafton holds three subsidiary titles, all created in 1672 in the peerage of England: Earl of Euston, Viscount Ipswich, and Baron Sudbury. Between 1723 and 1936 the Dukes also held the titles Earl of Arlington, Viscount Thetford and Baron Arlington. The Duke's eldest son and heir uses the courtesy title Earl of Euston.

The family seat is Euston Hall in Suffolk.

Contents

Dukes of Grafton (1675)

The Heir Apparent is the present holder's grandson, Henry Oliver Charles FitzRoy, Earl of Euston (b. 1978). He is the only son of James Oliver Charles FitzRoy, Earl of Euston (1947-2009).

Grafton

Most Dukedoms in Britain are of significant places such as counties, cities or major towns. Most Britons would, however, find it difficult to locate Grafton on a map of the kingdom. The title is that of the Honour of Grafton in the south east of Northamptonshire; the titular village now being called Grafton Regis.

Further reading

  • Falk, Bernard. The Royal Fitz Roys; Dukes of Grafton through Four Centuries. Hutchinson, 1950.

See also

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Dukedom of Grafton
Creation date 11 September 1675
Created by Charles II of England
Peerage Peerage of England
First holder Henry FitzRoy
Present holder Hugh FitzRoy, 11th Duke
Heir apparent Henry FitzRoy,
Earl of Euston
Remainder to heirs male of the body of the grantee
Subsidiary titles Earl of Euston; Viscount Ipswich; Baron Sudbury

The title of Duke of Grafton was created in 1675 by Charles II of England for his 2nd illegitimate son by the Duchess of Cleveland, Henry FitzRoy. The most famous duke was probably Augustus FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton, who served as Prime Minister in the 1760s.

The Duke of Grafton holds three subsidiary titles, all created in 1672 in the peerage of England: Earl of Euston, Viscount Ipswich, and Baron Sudbury. Between 1723 and 1936 the Dukes, being descended from the 1st Duke's wife Isabella FitzRoy, 2nd Countess of Arlington, also held the titles Earl of Arlington, Viscount Thetford and Baron Arlington. Those titles fell into abeyance between the 9th Duke's sisters, with the abeyance of barony Arlington being ended in 1999. The Duke's heir-apparent uses the courtesy title Earl of Euston.

The family seat is Euston Hall in Suffolk.

Contents

Dukes of Grafton (1675)

Other titles (all): Earl of Euston, Viscount Ipswich and Baron Sudbury (1672)
Other titles (2nd–9th Dukes): Earl of Arlington and Viscount Thetford (1672), Baron Arlington (1664), Baron Arlington (1672)
  • Charles FitzRoy, Earl of Euston (1714–1715), eldest son of the 2nd Duke
  • George FitzRoy, Earl of Euston (1715–1747), second son of the 2nd Duke
  • William FitzRoy, Viscount Ipswich (1884–1918), only son of the 8th Duke, predeceased both his father and grandfather
  • James Fitzroy, Earl of Euston (1947–2009), elder son of the 11th Duke, predeceased his father in 2009
  • Heir apparent: Henry FitzRoy, Earl of Euston (b. 1978), the late Lord Euston's only son

James FitzRoy was recently heir-apparent to the Duke of Grafton but died on 1 October 2009 aged 61. His son, then Viscount Ipswich, succeeded subsequently to the courtesy title of Earl of Euston and is the current heir-apparent to the dukedom.[1]

Grafton

Most Dukedoms in Britain are of significant places such as counties, cities or major towns. Most Britons would, however, find it difficult to locate Grafton on a map of the kingdom. The title is that of the Honour of Grafton in the south east of Northamptonshire; the titular village now being called Grafton Regis.

Further reading

  • Falk, Bernard. The Royal Fitz Roys; Dukes of Grafton through Four Centuries. Hutchinson, 1950.

References

  1. ^ Obituary Earl of Euston - Telegraph.co.uk, 25 Oct 2009

See also


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