Duke of Richmond: Wikis

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The title Duke of Richmond is named after Richmond and its surrounding district of Richmondshire, and has been created several times in the Peerage of England for members of the royal Tudor and Stuart families. The current lineage and title was created in 1675 for Charles Lennox, the illegitimate son of King Charles II of England and a Breton noblewoman called Louise de Kérouaille.

Contents

History of the Dukedom

The Dukedom was first created (as Duke of Richmond and Somerset) for Henry Fitzroy, the illegitimate son of Henry VIII Tudor by Elizabeth Blount. Upon his death without children in 1536 it became extinct.

Ludovic Stuart, second Duke of Lennox (see Lennox (district)) (1574–1624), who also held other titles in the peerage of Scotland, was created Earl of Richmond in 1613 and Duke of Richmond in 1623 as a member of the Lennox line (not unlike King James himself) in the House of Stuart. These became extinct at his death in 1624, but his Scottish honors devolved on his brother Esmé, Earl of March. Esmé's son James, the fourth Duke of Lennox (1612–1655), was created Duke of Richmond in 1641, the two dukedoms again becoming united. In 1672, on the death of James' nephew Charles, 3rd Duke of Richmond and 6th Duke of Lennox, both titles again became extinct.

The fourth creation was in August 1675, when Charles II granted the title to Charles Lennox, his illegitimate son by Louise de Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth. Charles Lennox was further created Duke of Lennox a month later. Charles' son, also Charles, succeeded to the French title Duke of Aubigny (of Aubigny-sur-Nère) on the death of his grandmother in 1734.

The 6th Duke of Richmond and Lennox was created Duke of Gordon (See Clan Gordon) in 1876. Thus, the Duke holds three (four, if the Aubigny claim is accepted) dukedoms, more than any other person in the realm. The Dukes of Richmond, Lennox and Gordon are normally styled Duke of Richmond and Gordon. Before the creation of the Dukedom of Gordon they were styled Duke of Richmond and Lennox.

The subsidiary titles are: Earl of March (created 1675), Earl of Darnley (1675), Earl of Kinrara (1876), Baron Settrington, of Settrington in the County of York (1675), and Lord Torbolton (1675). The titles Earl of March and Baron Settrington were created in the peerage of England along with the Dukedom of Richmond. The titles Earl of Darnley and Lord Torbolton were created in the Peerage of Scotland along with the Dukedom of Lennox. Finally, the title Earl of Kinrara was created in the peerage of the United Kingdom with the Dukedom of Gordon. The eldest son of the Duke uses the courtesy title Earl of March and Kinrara. Before the creation of the Dukedom of Gordon, the courtesy title used was Earl of March.

The family seat is Goodwood House near Chichester, West Sussex.

Coat of Arms

Duke of richmond.svg

On His Grace's coat of arms, the United Kingdom along with a border of Lennox and surmounted escutcheon of Aubigny, are represented in 1st and 4th cantons as Stuart titles, while Clan Gordon (1st Gordon, 2nd Badenoch, 3rd Seton, 4th Fraser--from acquisition of Aboyne lands) is represented in 2nd and 3rd cantons. The previous Stuart arms for Richmond had the French province of Berry in fat non-egalitarian cantons 1 and 4, Stuart arms bordered by Aubigny (in Berry) in cantons 2 and 3, with a surmounted Lennox escutcheon. Henry FitzRoy's arms were as follows: 1st and 4th canton borders for Brittany, 2nd and 3rd canton borders for Somerset, centred by the English Royal Arms, surmounted by an escutcheon of Nottingham, with a bar attached to show royal bastardy. Richmond has its own distinct badge, the Tudor rose as displayed by the Richmond Herald. Richmond was the compromise between Lancaster and York, in the Wars of the Roses.

The heraldic blazon is: Quarterly: 1st and 4th grand quarters, the Royal Arms of Charles II (viz. quarterly: 1st and 4th, France and England quarterly; 2nd, Scotland; 3rd, Ireland); the whole within a bordure company argent charged with roses gules barbed and seeded proper and the last; overall an escutcheon gules charged with three buckles or (the Dukedom of Aubigny); 2nd grand quarter, argent a saltire engrailed gules between four roses of the second barbed and seeded proper (Lennox); 3rd grand quarter, quarterly, 1st, azure three boars' heads couped or (Gordon); 2nd, or three lions' heads erased gules (Badenoch); 3rd, or three crescents within a double tressure flory counter-flory gules (Seton); 4th, azure three cinquefoils argent (Fraser).

Dukes of Richmond and Somerset (1525)

Subsidiary titles: Earl of Nottingham (1525)

Dukes of Richmond, first Creation (1623)

Other titles: Duke of Lennox (1581), Earl of Lennox (1580), Earl of Richmond (1613)

Dukes of Richmond, second Creation (1641)

Other titles: Duke of Lennox (1581), Earl of March (1619), Earl of Lichfield (1645), Baron Clifton (1608), Baron Stuart of Leighton Bromswold (1619)

Dukes of Richmond, third Creation (1675)

Other titles: Duke of Lennox (1675), Duke of Gordon (1876), Earl of March (1675), Earl of Darnley (1675), Earl of Kinrara (1876), Baron Settrington (1675), Lord Torbolton (1675)
  • Charles Gordon-Lennox, Lord Settrington (1899–1919)

The Heir Apparent is the present holder's son Charles Gordon-Lennox, Earl of March and Kinrara (b. 1955).
The Heir Apparent's Heir Apparent is his son Charles Gordon-Lennox, Lord Settrington (b. 1994).

References

See also

Further reading

  • Tillyard, Stella. Aristocrats: Caroline, Emily, Louisa, and Sarah Lennox, 1740–1832. Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1994.
  • Baird, Rosemary. Goodwood: Art and Architecture, Sport and Family, Frances Lincoln, 2007

External links

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. Son of Charles II.]] The title Duke of Richmond is named after Richmond and its surrounding district of Richmondshire, and has been created several times in the Peerage of England for members of the royal Tudor and Stuart families. The current lineage and title was created in 1675 for Charles Lennox, the illegitimate son of King Charles II of England and a Breton noblewoman called Louise de Kérouaille.

Contents

History of the Dukedom

The Dukedom was first created (as Duke of Richmond and Somerset) for Henry Fitzroy, the illegitimate son of Henry VIII (a Tudor) by Elizabeth Blount. Upon his death without children in 1536 it became extinct.

Ludovic Stuart, second Duke of Lennox (see Lennox (district)) (1574–1624), who also held other titles in the peerage of Scotland, was created Earl of Richmond in 1613 and Duke of Richmond in 1623 as a member of the Lennox line (not unlike King James himself) in the House of Stuart. These became extinct at his death in 1624, but his Scottish honours devolved on his brother Esmé, Earl of March. Esmé's son James, the fourth Duke of Lennox (1612–1655), was created Duke of Richmond in 1641, the two dukedoms again becoming united. In 1672, on the death of James' nephew Charles, 3rd Duke of Richmond and 6th Duke of Lennox, both titles again became extinct.

The fourth creation was in August 1675, when Charles II granted the title to Charles Lennox, his illegitimate son by Louise de Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth. Charles Lennox was further created Duke of Lennox a month later. Charles' son, also Charles, succeeded to the French title Duke of Aubigny (of Aubigny-sur-Nère) on the death of his grandmother in 1734.

The 6th Duke of Richmond and Lennox was created Duke of Gordon (See Clan Gordon) in 1876. Thus, the Duke holds three (four, if the Aubigny claim is accepted) dukedoms, more than any other person in the realm. The Dukes of Richmond, Lennox and Gordon are normally styled Duke of Richmond and Gordon. Before the creation of the Dukedom of Gordon they were styled Duke of Richmond and Lennox.

The subsidiary titles are: Earl of March (created 1675), Earl of Darnley (1675), Earl of Kinrara (1876), Baron Settrington, of Settrington in the County of York (1675), and Lord Torbolton (1675). The titles Earl of March and Baron Settrington were created in the peerage of England along with the Dukedom of Richmond. The titles Earl of Darnley and Lord Torbolton were created in the Peerage of Scotland along with the Dukedom of Lennox. Finally, the title Earl of Kinrara was created in the peerage of the United Kingdom with the Dukedom of Gordon. The eldest son of the Duke uses the courtesy title Earl of March and Kinrara. Before the creation of the Dukedom of Gordon, the courtesy title used was Earl of March.

The family seat is Goodwood House near Chichester, West Sussex.

Coat of arms

On His Grace's coat of arms, the United Kingdom along with a border of Lennox and surmounted escutcheon of Aubigny, are represented in 1st and 4th cantons as Stuart titles, while Clan Gordon (1st Gordon, 2nd Badenoch, 3rd Seton, 4th Fraser--from acquisition of Aboyne lands) is represented in 2nd and 3rd cantons. The previous Stuart arms for Richmond had the French province of Berry in fat non-egalitarian cantons 1 and 4, Stuart arms bordered by Aubigny (in Berry) in cantons 2 and 3, with a surmounted Lennox escutcheon. Henry FitzRoy's arms were as follows: 1st and 4th canton borders for Brittany, 2nd and 3rd canton borders for Somerset, centred by the English Royal Arms, surmounted by an escutcheon of Nottingham, with a bar attached to show royal bastardy. Richmond has its own distinct badge, the Tudor rose as displayed by the Richmond Herald. Richmond was the compromise between Lancaster and York, in the Wars of the Roses.

The heraldic blazon is: Quarterly: 1st and 4th grand quarters, the Royal Arms of Charles II (viz. quarterly: 1st and 4th, France and England quarterly; 2nd, Scotland; 3rd, Ireland); the whole within a bordure company argent charged with roses gules barbed and seeded proper and the last; overall an escutcheon gules charged with three buckles or (the Dukedom of Aubigny); 2nd grand quarter, argent a saltire engrailed gules between four roses of the second barbed and seeded proper (Lennox); 3rd grand quarter, quarterly, 1st, azure three boars' heads couped or (Gordon); 2nd, or three lions' heads erased gules (Badenoch); 3rd, or three crescents within a double tressure flory counter-flory gules (Seton); 4th, azure three cinquefoils argent (Fraser).

Dukes of Richmond and Somerset (1525)

Subsidiary titles: Earl of Nottingham (1525)

Dukes of Richmond, first Creation (1623)

Other titles: Duke of Lennox (1581), Earl of Lennox (1580), Earl of Richmond (1613)

Dukes of Richmond, second Creation (1641)

Other titles: Duke of Lennox (1581), Earl of March (1619), Earl of Lichfield (1645), Baron Clifton (1608), Baron Stuart of Leighton Bromswold(1619)

Dukes of Richmond, third Creation (1675)

Dukedom of Richmond
3rd Creation
Creation date 9 August 1675
Created by King Charles II
Peerage Peerage of England
First holder Charles Lennox
Present holder Charles Gordon-Lennox, 10th Duke
Heir apparent Charles Gordon-Lennox, Earl of March and Kinrara
Remainder to the 1st Duke's heirs male of the body lawfully begotten.
Subsidiary titles Duke of Lennox
Duke of Aubigny (France)
Duke of Gordon
Earl of March
Earl of Darnley
Earl of Kinrara
Baron Settrington
Lord Torbolton
Hereditary Constable of Inverness Castle
Other titles: Duke of Lennox (1675), Earl of March (1675), Earl of Darnley (1675), Baron of Settrington, in the county of York (1675) and Lord of Torboulton (1675)
  • Charles Lennox, Earl of March (1724), eldest son of the 2nd Duke, died in infancy
  • Charles Lennox, Earl of March (1730), second son of the 2nd Duke, died in infancy
Other titles (6th Duke onwards): Duke of Gordon and Earl of Kinrara, in the county of Inverness (1876)
  • Charles Gordon-Lennox, Lord Settrington (1899–1919), eldest son of the 8th Duke (at that point Earl of March), died without issue
  • Lord March's heir apparent: Charles Gordon-Lennox, Lord Settrington (b. 1994), Lord March's eldest son

See also

References

  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh ed.). Cambridge University Press. 

Further reading

  • Tillyard, Stella. Aristocrats: Caroline, Emily, Louisa, and Sarah Lennox, 1740–1832. Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1994.
  • Baird, Rosemary. Goodwood: Art and Architecture, Sport and Family, Frances Lincoln, 2007

External links


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