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Dunmore
Borough
File:Dunmore, Pennsylvania.jpg
Official name: Borough of Dunmore
Country  United States
State  Pennsylvania
County Lackawanna
Elevation 1,001 ft (305 m)
Coordinates 41°25′03″N 75°37′28″W / 41.4175°N 75.62444°W / 41.4175; -75.62444
Area 8.8 sq mi (23 km2)
 - land 8.7 sq mi (23 km2)
 - water 0.1 sq mi (0 km2)
Population 14,018 (2000)
Density 1,603.7 /sq mi (619 /km2)
Mayor Patrick W. Loughney
Timezone EST (UTC-5)
 - summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code 570
Location of Dunmore in Pennsylvania
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Website: www.dunmoreborough.com

Dunmore is a borough in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, adjoining Scranton. Dunmore was settled in 1835 and incorporated in 1862. Extensive anthracite coal, brick, stone, and silk interests had led to a rapid increase in the population to 8,315 in 1890, 12,583 in 1900, 17,615 in 1910, 20,250 in 1920, and 23,086 in 1940. The population was 14,018 at the 2000 census. Dunmore contains several schools: Dunmore High School, Holy Cross High School formerly known as Bishop O'Hara, and Saint Mary's of Mount Carmel Elementary School.

Contents

History

Dunmore is one of the numerous villages which sprang from the original township of Providence, Pennsylvania. Purchased from the natives in 1754, the territory now embracing this village offered its solitude to the pioneers seeking a home in the wilderness between the Delaware and the Susquehanna rivers until the summer of 1783.

At this time, William Allsworth, a shoemaker by trade, who had visited the Connecticut land at Wyoming for the purpose of selecting a place for his home the year previous, reached the point at evening, where he encamped and lit his fire in the forest where Dunmore was thus founded. The need of more places of rest to cheer the emigrants traveling with heavy burdens induced Mr. Allsworth to fix his abode at this spot. Deer and bear were so abundant for many years within sight of his clearing, that his family never trusted to his rifle in vain for a supply of venison or the substantial haunches of the bear.

The house of Mr. Allsworth, famed for the constant readiness of the host to smooth by his dry jokes and kind words the ruggedness of every man’s daily road, became a common point of interest and attraction to the emigrant or the wayfarer. The descendants of Mr. Allsworth have filled many places of trust and usefulness in the county, and adorned the various walks of social life. In the summer of 1795, Charles Dolph, John Carey, and John West began the labor of clearing and plowing lands in the neighborhood of Bucktown or Corners, as this place was long called after the first foot-path opened from Blakeley to the Roaring Brook crossed the Wyoming road at Allsworth’s.

Edward Lunnon, Isaac Dolph, James Brown, Philip Swartz and Levi De Puy, purchased land of the State between 1799-1805 and located in this portion of Providence Township. The old tavern, long since vanished with its round swinging sign and low bar-room, one corner of which, fortified with long pine-pickets, extended from the bar to the very ceiling, in times of yore, was owned successively by Wm. Allsworth, Philip Swartz, Isaac Dolph, Henry W. Drinker, and Samuel De Puy.

The external aspect of Dunmore promised so much by its agricultural expectations in 1813, that Dr. Orlo Hamlin, with his young wife, was induced to settle a mile north of Allsworth. He was the first physician and surgeon locating in Providence. The population of Dunmore and Blakeley, doubling in numbers and increasing in wealth, warranted Stephen Tripp in erecting a saw and grist mill in 1820, on the Roaring Brook half a mile south of the village.

A store was opened at the Corners in 1820 under the auspices of the Drinker Turnpike; but the village, consisting of but four houses, had but a negative existence until the Pennsylvania Coal Company, in 1847-1848, turned the sterile pasture-fields around it into a town liberal in the extent of its territory and diversified by every variety of life.

By 1875, the township of Providence was dissolved and the land split up into various smaller boroughs and towns with Dunmore being one of them. Today, Dunmore is a borough bordering the city of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

The name Dunmore comes from Dunmore Park, in the Falkirk area of Scotland (home of the Dunmore Pineapple).

Geography

Dunmore is located at 41°25′3″N 75°37′28″W / 41.4175°N 75.62444°W / 41.4175; -75.62444 (41.417530, -75.624432)[1].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 8.8 square miles (22.8 km²), of which, 8.7 square miles (22.6 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.2 km²) of it (0.79%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 14,018 people, 6,141 households, and 3,788 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,603.7 people per square mile (619.3/km²). There were 6,528 housing units at an average density of 746.8/sq mi (288.4/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 98.45% White, 0.49% African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.18% from other races, and 0.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.88% of the population.

There were 6,141 households out of which 24.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.1% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.3% were non-families. 34.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the borough the population was spread out with 20.9% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 27.6% from 25 to 44, 22.4% from 45 to 64, and 22.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 88.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.4 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $33,280, and the median income for a family was $43,354. Males had a median income of $32,855 versus $24,167 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $19,851. About 6.7% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.1% of those under age 18 and 11.8% of those age 65 or over.

Notable natives and residents

References

  1. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Dunmore article)

From Wikitravel

Dunmore is a borough in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania. It is located outside of Scranton.

History:

(Taken from Susan W. Pieroth's compilation found at http://www.rootsweb.com/~palackaw/news/providence.html)

Dunmore is one of the numerous villages which sprang from the original township of Providence, Pennsylvania. Purchased from the natives in 1754, the territory now embracing this village offered its solitude to the pioneers seeking a home in the wilderness between the Delaware and the Susquehanna rivers until the summer of 1783.

At this time, William Allsworth, a shoemaker by trade, who had visited the Connecticut land at Wyoming for the purpose of selecting a place for his home the year previous, reached the point at evening, where he encamped and lit his fire in the forest where Dunmore was thus founded. The need of more places of rest to cheer the emigrants traveling with heavy burdens induced Mr. Allsworth to fix his abode at this spot. Deer and bear were so abundant for many years within sight of his clearing, that his family never trusted to his rifle in vain for a supply of venison or the substantial haunches of the bear.

The house of Mr. Allsworth, famed for the constant readiness of the host to smooth by his dry jokes and kind words the ruggedness of every man’s daily road, became a common point of interest and attraction to the emigrant or the wayfarer. The descendants of Mr. Allsworth have filled many places of trust and usefulness in the county, and adorned the various walks of social life. In the summer of 1795, Charles Dolph, John Carey, and John West began the labor of clearing and plowing lands in the neighborhood of Bucktown or Corners, as this place was long called after the first foot-path opened from Blakeley to the Roaring Brook crossed the Wyoming road at Allsworth’s.

Edward Lunnon, Isaac Dolph, James Brown, Philip Swartz and Levi De Puy, purchased land of the State between 1799-1805 and located in this portion of Providence Township. The old tavern, long since vanished with its round swinging sign and low bar-room, one corner of which, fortified with long pine-pickets, extended from the bar to the very ceiling, in times of yore, was owned successively by Wm. Allsworth, Philip Swartz, Isaac Dolph, Henry W. Drinker, and Samuel De Puy.

The external aspect of Dunmore promised so much by its agricultural expectations in 1813, that Dr. Orlo Hamlin, with his young wife, was induced to settle a mile north of Allsworth. He was the first physician and surgeon locating in Providence. The population of Dunmore and Blakeley, doubling in numbers and increasing in wealth, warranted Stephen Tripp in erecting a saw and grist mill in 1820, on the Roaring Brook half a mile south of the village.

A store was opened at the Corners in 1820 under the auspices of the Drinker Turnpike; but the village, consisting of but four houses, had but a negative existence until the Pennsylvania Coal Company, in 1847-1848, turned the sterile pasture-fields around it into a town liberal in the extent of its territory and diversified by every variety of life.

By 1875, the township of Providence was dissolved and the land split up into various smaller boroughs and towns with Dunmore being one of them. Today, Dunmore is a borough bordering the town of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

The name Dunmore comes from Dunmore Park, in the Falkirk area of Scotland (home of the Dunmore Pineapple).

Amongst the local citizens the colloquial term for spaghetti is Spezgoots.

Get In

By Plane Dunmore, PA is about 20 minutes north of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport in Avoca. This airport operates daily flights to Atlanta, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Detroit, Chicago, Philadelphia, and Charlotte. There are also Rental cars available from a variety of companies at the terminal.

Dunmore is also around three hours driving distance away from the Newark International Airport in New Jersey, the JFK International Airport in New York City, and the Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia.

By Car Dunmore can be accessed primarily by car. From the New England region is I-84 West. From New York city area is I-80 East and I-380 North. From the Penn State or Pittsburgh areas are I-80 West and I-380 North. From the Allentown and Philadelphia areas is I-476 (the Pennsylvania Turnpike Northeast Extension). From the Syracuse area is I-80 South. From the Washington DC area is I-80 North.

By Bus A few bus lines are offered to take people into the city of Scranton, which is just minutes away from Dunmore. These bus lines are Martz Trailways and Greyhound Bus Line. Martz Trailways operates to New York City and Philadelphia Daily. Greyhound Bus Line has a stop in Scranton along with Harrisburg, Binghamton, Allentown, Philadelphia, New York City, and many more.

Get Around

Easy ways to get around Dunmore and the surrounding area are by bicycle, car, foot, or bus.

The bicycle community is increasing with the increase in the price of gas. There is a great deal of groups involved in biker safety and biker awareness. Biking around the area is a safe and easy way to get around.

The most popular way to travel around the area is by car. With many highways available to Dunmore, it is easy to get out and get around. Private taxicabs such as Posten and McCarthy service the area as well. They are hired by telephone through central dispatch and cannot be hailed on the street as in larger cities.

Walking is also a safe and easy way to get around Dunmore. Being a very small town, it is also very safe so people should not feel threatened walking to get around.

County of Lackawanna Transit System (COLTS) also operates public buses throughout all parts of the city and a few Lackawanna County extremities. The system typically operates from 7AM-7PM and does not operate on Sundays or Holidays.

Do

Dunmore is a home to many things. There is the center of town, called the Dunmore Corners, that holds many family run stores, restaurants, and bars. Among these restaurants and stores are Cara Mia's, The Dunmore Candy Kitchen, Doma's Importing Co., The Bucktown Diner, Metallo's, Kathy Karen's Children Shop, Head To Toe, Cugino's, Danny B's, and many more. There are also 3 banks that reside in the corners. There are many other bars, restaurants, and shops throughout the city including The Honky Tonk, Burger King, New China Star, Dunkin Donuts, Friendly's, Ragnacci's, Dunmore Appliance, Rite Aid, CVS, Blockbuster, Gertude Hawk Chocolates, and many others. Dunmore is a small town that still has tons to do.

Sleep

Dunmore has several hotels around the area. In the borough itself it has a Holiday Inn, a Sleep Inn and Suites, a Days Inn, the Dunmore Inn, the Scottish Inn, and a few more. However, you can also go outside of Dunmore and stay in Scranton which contains many more hotels.

Schools

Dunmore has a public school system called the Dunmore School District. This school district has the Dunmore Elementary School, the Dunmore Middle School, and the Dunmore High School. Among the borough, there are several other schools as well. There is St. Anthony of Padua, St. Mary's of Mount Carmel, and Holy Cross (formally known as Bishop O'Hara).


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