Duquesne Dukes: Wikis

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Duquesne Dukes is the name of the athletic teams of Duquesne University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Duquesne has played men's basketball only in NCAA Division I and has played football as a club team from 1891-1894, 1896-1903, 1913-1914, and 1920-1928, in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) from 1929-1942 and 1947-1950, again as a club team from 1969-1978, in NCAA Division III from 1979-1992, and in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) from 1993-present.

Contents

Mascot

The "Dukes" nickname dates back to 1911, when what is now Duquesne University changed its name to honor the Marquis Du Quesne, the French governor of Canada, who first brought Catholic observances to the Pittsburgh area.

Since a Marquis and a Duke are not visually distinct (and the name "Duquesne" implies a "Duke"), the unofficial symbol of the school's athletic teams became a man dressed in a top hat, tails and a regal sash across his chest. "Dukes" being more readily recognized than "Marquis," the name Duke was popularly assigned to the symbol and stuck ever since the fall of 1911.

The Duquesne Dukes' "Duke" mascot, unveiled in 2003.

The Duquesne Department of Athletics unveiled its most notable "Duke" mascot prior to the January 18, 2003 game against the University of Richmond. The Duke is 7-feet tall with an oversized head and sports a dapper navy blue suit with red piping, a red shirt with a red bow tie, and red gloves, with a black top hat. The new Duke replaces "Duke the Bear" who was a fixture at DU athletic events since 1996.

At the December 13, 2008 game versus West Virginia, Duquesne introduced its new human-figure mascot to replace the 7 foot tall character mascot. "Dickie Duke" is the name of the mascot who traditionally sports his black jacket with coat-tails and overbearing top-hat.

Duquesne's school colors of scarlet and navy, the colors of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost , have been in place since the school's inception.[1]

University fight song

The Victory Song (Red and Blue) was written in 1926. Words and music were composed by Father Thomas J. Quigley (class of 1927).[2]

We'll sing hooray for the Red and Blue,
A big hooray for the Red and Blue;
For the flag we love on to victory,
And when the foe is down,
We will raise a mighty shout
And sing hooray for the Red and Blue;
We're all your sons and daughters true.
Now with all your might, give them
Fight! Fight! Fight!
For the grand old Red and Blue.

Basketball

For extended information about the men's basketball team, see Duquesne Dukes men's basketball.

The Dukes men's basketball team has had great success over the years, playing twice in national championship games in the 1950s and winning the National Invitation Tournament championship in 1955. (At the time, the NIT was the premier collegiate basketball tournament in the country.) The men's basketball Dukes annually play their cross-town rival, the University of Pittsburgh Panthers, in Pittsburgh's much anticipated and highly attended City Game. The current head coach is Ron Everhart, who has a two-year record of 27-32 (13-19 in the Atlantic 10 Conference).

The Dukes women's basketball team also plays the University of Pittsburgh every year in the women's version of the City Game. The current head coach is Women's Basketball Hall of Famer Suzie McConnell-Serio, who has a two-year record of 35-27.

Fictional Portrayals

A Duquesne Dukes men's basketball player's heart ailment serves as the major plot device for the pilot episode of Pittsburgh based CBS medical drama Three Rivers.

Football

The Dukes begin playing varsity football in 2008 in the NCAA Division I Northeast Conference. In recent years, Duquesne Football was a member of the NCAA Division I Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference, winning or sharing 11 conference titles, including nine in a row and 11 of the past 13.

Duquesne was the ECAC Bowl champions and NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major National Champions in 2003. (The team was the 1995 ECAC Bowl Champions as well. Duquesne was rated #1 Division 1 in the Nation by the Massey Ratings in 1941 and won a NCFA- Club National Championship in 1973)

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Major Bowl Games

The Dukes had some success before NCAA college football's alignment into divisions. Duquesne won the 1934 Festival of Palms Bowl (now known as the "Orange Bowl") and 1937 Orange Bowl.

AP Poll Appearances

From 1933-42, Duquesne was among the elite college football teams in the United States, garnering the sixth-highest winning percentage (71-22-2, 0.762) in the nation behind Alabama, Tennessee, Duke, Fordham, and Notre Dame. In 1941, Duquesne finished the season undefeated and untied, earning a No. 8 Associated Press ranking while leading the nation in scoring defense, rushing defense, and total defense. (Duquesne also led all of NCAA Division I Football in scoring defense in 2002 and rushing defense, passing defense, and total defense in 2005.)

  • October 19, 1936 #11
  • November 16, 1936 #20
  • November 23, 1936 #12
  • November 30, 1936 #14 FINAL
  • November 1, 1937 #16
  • October 23, 1939 #11
  • October 30, 1939 #13
  • November 6, 1939 #12
  • November 13, 1939 #10
  • November 20, 1939 #20
  • November 27, 1939 #6
  • December 4, 1939 #10
  • December 11, 1939 #10 FINAL
  • October 27, 1941 #16
  • November 3, 1941 #12
  • November 10, 1941 #10
  • November 17, 1941 #6
  • November 24, 1941 #5
  • December 1, 1941 #8 FINAL
  • October 12, 1942 #13

Innovations

Duquesne is noted for establishing numerous firsts in collegiate football. Former head coach Elmer Layden is credited with devising the system of hand signals that officials use today. The signal system was put to use for the first time on November 11, 1928, when Duquesne hosted Thiel College at Pitt Stadium. Layden was also the first coach to use two sets of uniform jerseys for home and away contests. In 1929, graduate student manager John Holohan conceived the idea of Pittsburgh's first night game at Forbes Field. On the evening of November 1 that year, the Dukes made history by defeating Geneva College, 27-7, in front of more than 27,000 spectators.

At the club level, Duquesne won the 1973 National Club Football Association National Championship and was runner-up in 1977.

The Dukes football team also boasts the greatest all-time intraconference winning streak in NCAA Division I FCS history with 39 straight wins in the MAAC. The 39-game streak also ties for the second-longest intraconference winning streak in NCAA Division I Football history, five games shy of the all-time record.

Although Duquesne will offer football scholarships as it moves to the Northeast Conference as an associate member in 2008, the Dukes will still be in consideration for the NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major National Championship as awarded by The Sports Network, at least until further notice.

The National Football League's Pittsburgh franchise has drafted more players out of Duquesne University than any other institution.

Yearly football results

(yellow = .500 record; soft orange = above .500 record; green = undefeated)

Year Wins Losses Ties Coach Rankings Championships National Championships
Total 363 268 19
2008 3 7 0 Jerry Schmitt
2007 6 4 0 Jerry Schmitt #8 NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major (Sports Network) Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Champions
2006 7 3 0 Jerry Schmitt #6 NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major (Sports Network) MAAC Champions
2005 7 3 0 Jerry Schmitt #3 NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major (Sports Network) MAAC Champions
2004 7 3 0 Greg Gattuso #5 NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major (Sports Network) MAAC Champions
2003 8 3 0 Greg Gattuso #1 NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major (Sports Network) MAAC Champions
Eastern College Athletic Conference Bowl Champions
NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major National Champions
2002 11 1 0 Greg Gattuso #2 NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major (Sports Network) MAAC Champions
2001 8 3 0 Greg Gattuso #4 NCAA Division I FCS Mid-Major (Sports Network) MAAC Champions
2000 10 1 0 Greg Gattuso MAAC Champions
1999 8 3 0 Greg Gattuso MAAC Champions
1998 8 3 0 Greg Gattuso
1997 7 3 0 Greg Gattuso
1996 10 1 0 Greg Gattuso MAAC Champions
1995 10 1 0 Greg Gattuso MAAC Champions
ECAC Bowl Champions
1994 6 4 0 Greg Gattuso
1993 4 6 0 Greg Gattuso
1992 5 4 0 Dan McCann
1991 0 9 0 Dan McCann
1990 1 8 1 Dan McCann
1989 6 4 0 Dan McCann
1988 2 7 0 Dan McCann
1987 2 7 0 Terry Russell
1986 5 3 1 Terry Russell
1985 3 6 0 Terry Russell
1984 3 5 1 Terry Russell
1983 5 4 1 Dan McCann
1982 6 3 0 Dan McCann
1981 4 5 0 Dan McCann
1980 4 5 0 Dan McCann
1979 5 4 0 Dan McCann
1978 5 3 0 Dan McCann #7 club football (National Club Football Association)
1977 7 2 0 Dan McCann #2 club football (NCFA)
1976 6 2 0 Dan McCann #4 club football (NCFA)
1975 5 4 0 Dan McCann
1974 5 2 0 Dan McCann #6 club football (NCFA)
1973 10 0 0 Dan McCann #1 club football (NCFA) NCFA National Champions
1972 7 1 0 Dan McCann #3 club football (NCFA)
1971 4 4 0 Dan McCann
1970 4 3 1 Dan McCann #15 club football (NCFA)
1969 2 4 0 Joe Nicoletti
1950 2 6 1 Phil Ahwesh / Doc Skender
1949 3 6 0 Phil Ahwesh
1948 2 7 0 Kass Kovalcheck
1947 2 8 0 Kass Kovalcheck
1942 6 3 0 Aldo Donelli
1941 8 0 0 Aldo Donelli #8 NCAA Division I FBS (Associated Press) #1 NCAA Division I FBS (Massey Ratings)
1940 7 1 0 Aldo Donelli
1939 8 0 1 Aldo Donelli #10 NCAA Division I FBS (AP)
1938 4 6 0 Clipper Smith
1937 6 4 0 Clipper Smith
1936 8 2 0 Clipper Smith #14 NCAA Division I FBS (AP) Orange Bowl Champions
1935 6 3 0 Christy Flanagan
1934 8 2 0 Joe Bach
1933 10 1 0 Elmer Layden Festival of Palms Bowl Champions
1932 7 2 1 Elmer Layden
1931 3 5 3 Elmer Layden
1930 7 3 0 Elmer Layden
1929 9 0 1 Elmer Layden
1928 8 1 0 Elmer Layden
1927 4 4 1 Elmer Layden
1926 2 5 1 Frank McDermott
1925 0 7 0 Frank McDermott
1924 2 4 2 Mike Shortley
1923 4 4 0 Hal Ballin
1922 0 8 0 Hal Ballin
1921 0 4 1 E.A. Jake Stahl
1920 3 3 1 E.A. Jake Stahl
1914 1 5 0 Dr. Budd
1913 3 5 1 Dr. Budd
1903 3 5 0 T.A. Giblin
1902 1 6 0 T.A. Giblin
1901 1 1 0 Coach Unknown Record Incomplete
1900 2 3 1 Coach Unknown Record Incomplete
1899 2 0 2 Walker Record Incomplete
1898 5 4 1 J. Van Cleve Record Incomplete
1897 2 4 1 J.P. Wolfe Record Incomplete
1896 12 1 0 Mr. Brown
1894 9 3 0 Coach Unknown
1893 0 2 0 Coach Unknown Record Incomplete

1891-1892: Results Unavailable

Other varsity sports

The Dukes wrestling squad has also been immensely successful, although it competes as an Independent in NCAA Division I. The Dukes wrestlers have won two NCAA Division I East Regional Championships (2000 and 2005) and have sent at least one wrestler to the NCAA Championships every year during John Hartupee's 11 seasons as head coach, the position he currently holds.

Duquesne fielded an NCAA varsity rifle team for many years (a coed sport). This team competed in the Middle Atlantic Rifle Conference, claiming a share of the conference title in the 2001-02 season. The team officially disbanded after the 2003-04 season.

Recently, Duquesne's Olympic/"non-revenue" sports were led by distance runner Tom Slosky, a member of the university's cross country and indoor and outdoor track & field teams. Slosky is a five-time Atlantic 10 champion--winning a team and individual cross country title in 2005 and 2007, respectively, and the conference's 3,000-meter steeplechase as a member of Duquesne's outdoor track & field program in 2005, 2006 and 2008--as well as a three-time IC4A champion in the 3,000-meter steeplechase (2006, 2007 and 2008). Slosky also was a 3,000-meter steeplechase competitor in the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track & Field Championships in 2006, 2007 and 2008--advancing to the final heat in 2007--and a competitor in the 2007 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships.

Club sports

McCloskey Field, renovated in 1998, is bordered by a four-lane track.

Duquesne fields many club, or non-varsity, teams that compete regularly against other schools. Club sports offered at Duquesne are tennis, men's indoor track & field, men's rowing, men's ice hockey, and men's roller hockey.

The Duquesne Club Tennis team started in the Fall of 2008. They are a part of the USTA's Tennis on Campus program.

The men's indoor track & field program practices and competes alongside Duquesne's varsity women's indoor track & field program during the winter months and is affiliated with the Intercollegiate Association of Amateur Athletes of America. The men's team is recognized as varsity during the spring months when it becomes an outdoor track & field program and competes in the Atlantic 10, although it maintains its affiliation with the IC4A.

The men's rowing program generally practices and competes alongside Duquesne's varsity women's rowing team.

The men's ice hockey team is affiliated with the Division I level of the American Collegiate Hockey Association, competing in the College Hockey Mid-America conference. The team was CHMA champions during the 2006–07 season.

The men's roller hockey team competed as a Division II team in the National Collegiate Roller Hockey Association (NCRHA)'s Eastern Collegiate Roller Hockey Association (ECRHA), specifically in the Central Conference. The team is currently inactive.

Atlantic 10 Championships

Duquesne's first full/"postseason" Atlantic 10 team championship came in 1977 with a men's championship in the Eastern Collegiate Basketball League (the forerunner to the Eastern Athletic Association—now known as the Atlantic 10 Conference. The Dukes' only other full/"postseason" Atlantic 10 team championship came in 2005 by way of men's cross country, but the Dukes have also won numerous regular season Atlantic 10 team championships. Men's basketball was co-champion of the league's regular seasons in both 1980 and 1981 when it was known as the Eastern Athletic Association. Men's soccer was co-champion of the league's regular season in 2003, sole champion in 2004, and again co-champion in 2005. Women's lacrosse was co-champion of the league's regular seasons in both 2004 and 2005.

The Dukes have crowned numerous full Atlantic 10 individual champions in men's cross country (1), women's rowing (5), men's and women's swimming [17 (men), 10 (women)], women's indoor track and field (8), and men's and women's outdoor track & field [11 (men), 8 (women)].

Postseason/"Full" (62)

Team (2)

Men's Basketball (1)

  • 1977 – Eastern Collegiate Basketball League (the forerunner to the Eastern Athletic Association--now known as the Atlantic 10 Conference)

Men's Cross Country (1)

  • 2005

Individual (60)

Men's Cross Country (1)

  • Tom Slosky – 2007

Women's Rowing (5)

  • Novice 4 – 1999
  • Novice 4 – 2007
  • Lightweight 4 – 2007
  • Lightweight 8 - 2008
  • Lightweight 8 - 2009

Men's Swimming & Diving (17)

  • 100-yard Freestyle – Edwin Wicker – 2003
  • 100-yard Backstroke – Scott Darwin – 2005
  • 200-yard Backstroke – Scott Darwin – 2005
  • 50-yard Freestyle – Scott Darwin – 2006
  • 100-yard Freestyle – Edwin Wicker – 2006
  • 200-yard Freestyle Relay – Edwin Wicker, Ian Walsh, Mike Ley and Scott Darwin – 2006
  • 50-yard Freestyle – Edwin Wicker – 2007
  • 200-yard Freestyle Relay – Eric Bugby, Scott Darwin, Mike Ley and Edwin Wicker – 2007
  • 100-yard Butterfly – Eric Bugby – 2007
  • 400-yard Freestyle Relay – Eric Bugby, Scott Darwin, Ian Walsh and Edwin Wicker – 2007
  • 800-yard Freestyle Relay – Jim O'Hara, Brendan Schilling, Ian Walsh and Edward LeBlanc – 2008
  • 500-yard Freestyle – Edward LeBlanc – 2008
  • 200-yard Freestyle Relay – Brendan Schilling, Jim O'Hara, Rich Ryan and Edward LeBlanc – 2008
  • 200-yard Freestyle – Edward LeBlanc – 2008
  • 400-yard Freestyle Relay – Jim O'Hara, Brendan Schilling, Ian Walsh and Edward LeBlanc – 2008
  • 200-yard Freestyle - Edward LeBlanc - 2009
  • 100-yard Breaststroke - Ian Walsh - 2009

Women's Swimming & Diving (10)

  • 50-yard Freestyle – Katrina Streiner – 2006
  • 200-yard Backstroke – Kyla Favret – 2006
  • 100-yard Freestyle – Melissa Johnson – 2007
  • 1,650-yard Freestyle – Liz Yager – 2007
  • 200-yard Freestyle Relay – Melissa Johnson, Lauren Stephens, Christina Sherrard and Katrina Streiner – 2008
  • 200-yard Freestyle – Melissa Johnson – 2008
  • 200-yard Backstroke – Kyla Favret – 2008
  • 100-yard Freestyle – Melissa Johnson – 2008
  • 50-yard Freestyle - Christina Sherrard - 2009
  • 100-yard Freestyle - Christina Sherrard - 2009

Women's Indoor Track & Field (8)

  • Triple Jump – Shea McMillan – 2002
  • 4,000-meter Distance Medley Relay – Michelle Flynn, Julie Tyo, Alison Buchanan and Carrie Hucko – 2003
  • 1,000-meter Run – Tara Gerlach – 2004
  • 3,200-meter Relay – Tara Gerlach, Elizabeth Graham, Alison Buchanan and Michelle Flynn – 2004
  • 4,000-meter Distance Medley Relay – Tara Gerlach, Emily Beahan, Ashley Earnest and Amy Ruffolo – 2006
  • 1,000-meter Run – Emily Beahan – 2007
  • 4,000-meter Distance Medley Relay – Amy Ruffolo, Ashley Earnest, Emily Beahan and Samantha Howard – 2007
  • Pole Vault – Daniela Siciliano – 2007

Men's Outdoor Track & Field (11)

  • Long Jump – Leigh Bodden – 2002
  • 10,000-meter Run – Ryan Bender – 2004
  • High Jump – Mike Murawski – 2005
  • Hammer Throw – Chuck Mohan – 2005
  • Discus Throw – Chuck Mohan – 2005
  • 3,000-meter Steeplechase – Tom Slosky – 2005
  • 3,000-meter Steeplechase – Tom Slosky – 2006
  • Discus Throw – Robert Healy, III – 2006
  • 3,000-meter Steeplechase – Derek Dutille – 2007
  • 10,000-meter Run – Josh Eddy – 2007
  • 3,000-meter Steeplechase – Tom Slosky – 2008

Women's Outdoor Track & Field (8)

  • 100-meter Hurdles – Nicole Wiley – 2001
  • 400-meter Hurdles – Kathleen McCabe – 2002
  • Triple Jump – Shea McMillan – 2002
  • Discus Throw – Melissa Stewart – 2003
  • Pole Vault – Sarah Fetterman – 2004
  • Pole Vault – Sarah Fetterman – 2005
  • 400-meter Hurdles – Kristen Micsky – 2005
  • 3,000-meter Steeplechase – Amy Ruffolo – 2005

Regular Season (7)

Team (7)

Men's Basketball (2)

Men's Soccer (3)

  • 2003 – Co-Champions
  • 2004
  • 2005 – Co-Champions

Women's Lacrosse (2)

  • 2004 – Co-Champions
  • 2005 – Co-Champions

References

  1. ^ "Why Dukes?". Official Athletic Site. Duquesne University. http://goduquesne.cstv.com/trads/duqu-fight-song.html. Retrieved 2007-10-15.  
  2. ^ "The Duquesne University Fight Song". Official Athletic Site. Duquesne University. http://goduquesne.cstv.com/trads/duqu-why-dukes.html. Retrieved 2007-10-15.  

External links and sources


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