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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Durban
—  City  —
Durban Skyline
Durban is located in South Africa
Durban
Coordinates: 29°53′S 31°03′E / 29.883°S 31.05°E / -29.883; 31.05Coordinates: 29°53′S 31°03′E / 29.883°S 31.05°E / -29.883; 31.05
Country South Africa South Africa
Province KwaZulu-Natal
Metropolitan municipality eThekwini
Established 1835
Government
 - Mayor Obed Mlaba (ANC)
Area [1]
 - Total 2,291.89 km2 (884.9 sq mi)
Population (2007)[2]
 - Total 3,468,086
 Density 1,513/km2 (3,918.7/sq mi)
Time zone South Africa Standard Time (UTC+2)
Postal Code 4001
Area code(s) 031
Website www.durban.gov.za

Durban (Zulu: eThekwini) is the third largest city in South Africa, forming part of the eThekwini metropolitan municipality. It is the largest city in KwaZulu-Natal and is famous as the busiest port in Africa. It is also a major centre of tourism due to the city's warm subtropical climate and beaches.

According to the 2007 Community Survey, the city has a population of almost 3.5 million.[2] Durban's land area of 2,292 square kilometers (884.9 sq mi) is comparatively larger than other South African cities, resulting in a somewhat lower population density of 1,513 inhabitants per square kilometre (3,918.7/sq mi).[1]

Contents

History

It is thought that the first known inhabitants of the Durban area arrived from the north around 100,000 BC, according to carbon dating of rock art found in caves in the Drakensberg. These people were living in the central plains of KwaZulu-Natal until the expansion of Bantu people from the north sometime during the last millennium.

Little is known of the history of the first residents, as there is no written history of the area before it was first mentioned by Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, who came to the KwaZulu-Natal coast while searching for a route from Europe to India. He landed on the KwaZulu-Natal coast on Christmas in 1497, and thus named the area "Natal", or Christmas in Portuguese.

The modern city of Durban dates from 1824, when a party of 25 men under British Lieutenant F. G. Farewell arrived from the Cape Colony and established a settlement on the northern shore of the Bay of Natal, near today's Farewell Square. Accompanying Farewell was an adventurer named Henry Francis Fynn (1803–1861). Fynn was able to befriend the Zulu King Shaka by helping him to recover from a stab wound he suffered in battle. As a token of Shaka's gratitude, he granted Fynn a "25-mile strip of coast a hundred miles in depth."[citation needed].

Historical architecture in Durban; Durban City Hall.

During a meeting of 35 white residents in Fynn's territory on June 23, 1835, it was decided to build a capital town and name it "d'Urban" after Sir Benjamin d'Urban, then governor of the Cape Colony.[3]

Voortrekkers established the Republic of Natalia in 1838 just north of Durban, and established a capital at Pietermaritzburg.

Fierce conflict with the Zulu population led to the evacuation of Durban, and eventually the Afrikaners accepted British annexation in 1844 under military pressure.
A British governor was appointed to the region and many settlers emigrated from Europe and the Cape Colony. The British established a sugar cane industry in the 1860s. Farm owners had a difficult time attracting Zulu labourers to work on their plantations, so the British brought thousands of indentured labourers from India on five-year contracts. As a result of the importation of Indian labourers, Durban became the largest Asian community in South Africa.

Durban today

Today, Durban is the busiest container port in Africa,[citation needed] and a popular tourist destination. The Golden Mile, developed as a welcoming tourist destination in the 1970s, as well as Durban at large, provide ample tourist attractions, particularly for people on holiday from Johannesburg. It lost its international holiday pre-eminence to Cape Town in the 1990s, but remains more popular among domestic tourists. The city is also a gateway to the national parks and historic sites of Zululand and the Drakensberg.

Government and politics

The mayor of eThekwini is elected for a five year term. Since 1996, the mayor has been Obed Mlaba, who was re-elected to his third term in 2006.

The Freedom of Expression Institute has reported that there have been problems with the Municipality allowing shack dwellers their legal right to march.[4]

Geography and climate

Durban
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
134
 
28
21
 
 
113
 
28
21
 
 
120
 
28
20
 
 
73
 
26
17
 
 
59
 
25
14
 
 
28
 
23
11
 
 
39
 
23
11
 
 
62
 
23
13
 
 
73
 
23
15
 
 
98
 
24
17
 
 
108
 
25
18
 
 
102
 
27
20
average max. and min. temperatures in °C
precipitation totals in mm
source: SAWS[5]

Durban is characterised by a mild subtropical climate with warm wet summers and mild moist to dry winters, which are frost-free. However, due to large altitude variations, some western suburbs get slightly chilly in the winter. Durban has an annual rainfall of 1,009 millimetres (39.7 in) The average annual temperature is 21 °C (70 °F), with daytime maxima peaking from January to March at 28 °C (82 °F) and the minimum is 21 °C (70 °F), dropping to daytime highs from June to August of 23 °C (73 °F) and the minimum is 11 °C (52 °F). Sunrise in Durban is at 04h45 *(04h15) and sunset is 19h00 *(19h30) in summer & rise at 06h30 *(06h10) and set at 17h20 *(17h00) in winter. (* = dawn and dusk)

The metropolitan area is topographically hilly, with very few flat areas, except in the immediate vicinity of the central business district and the harbour. The western suburbs off Hillcrest and Kloof are significantly higher above sea-level, reaching up to 850 metres (2,789 ft) in the community of Botha's Hill. Many gorges and ravines are found within the metropolitan area. There is almost no true coastal plain.

Climate data for Durban
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 36
(97)
34
(93)
35
(95)
36
(97)
34
(93)
36
(97)
34
(93)
36
(97)
37
(99)
40
(104)
34
(93)
36
(97)
40
(104)
Average high °C (°F) 28
(82)
28
(82)
28
(82)
26
(79)
25
(77)
23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(73)
24
(75)
25
(77)
27
(81)
25
(77)
Average low °C (°F) 21
(70)
21
(70)
20
(68)
17
(63)
14
(57)
11
(52)
11
(52)
13
(55)
15
(59)
17
(63)
18
(64)
20
(68)
17
(63)
Record low °C (°F) 14
(57)
13
(55)
12
(54)
9
(48)
5
(41)
4
(39)
3
(37)
3
(37)
5
(41)
8
(46)
10
(50)
12
(54)
3
(37)
Precipitation mm (inches) 134
(5.28)
113
(4.45)
120
(4.72)
73
(2.87)
59
(2.32)
28
(1.1)
39
(1.54)
62
(2.44)
73
(2.87)
98
(3.86)
108
(4.25)
102
(4.02)
1,009
(39.72)
Avg. precipitation days 15 13 13 9 7 5 5 7 11 15 16 15 130
Source: South African Weather Service (Note: These climate records are for the period 1961–1990.) [5] 6 March 2010

Demographics

Population density in Durban
     <1 /km²      1–3 /km²      3–10 /km²      10–30 /km²      30–100 /km²      100–300 /km²      300–1000 /km²      1000–3000 /km²      >3000 /km²
Geographical distribution of home languages in Durban
     Afrikaans      English      Xhosa      Zulu
     No language dominant

Black Africans account for 68.30 percent of the population, followed by Asians or Indians at 19.90 percent, Whites at 8.98 percent and Coloureds at 2.89 percent. 48.9 percent of the population is under the age of 24, while 4.2 percent are over the age of 65. The median age in the city is 25 years old, and for every 100 females, there are 92.5 males. 27.9 percent of city residents are unemployed. 88.6 percent of the unemployed are black, 18.3 percent are Coloureds, 8.2 percent are Asians or Indians, and 4.4 percent are White.[6]

63.04 percent of Durban residents speak Zulu at home, 29.96 percent speak English (roughly representing the Indian, Coloured and White populations), 3.43 percent speak Xhosa, 1.44 percent speak Afrikaans, 0.7 percent speak Sotho, 0.2 percent speak Ndebele, 0.1 percent speaks Northern Sotho, and 0.93 percent of the population speaks a non-official language at home. 68.0 percent of residents are Christian, 15.5 percent have no religion, 11.3 percent are Hindu, 3.2 percent are Muslim, and 0.1 percent are Jewish. 1.9 percent are members of other religions or have undetermined beliefs.[6]

10.0 percent of residents aged 20 and over have received no schooling, 13.3 percent have had some primary school, 5.7 percent have completed only primary school, 34.6 percent have had some high school education, 26.8 percent have finished only high school, and 9.6 percent have an education higher than the high school level. Overall, 36.4 percent of residents have completed high school. The median annual income of working adults aged 15–65 is ZAR 20,695. Males have a median annual income of ZAR 24,851 versus ZAR 16,927 for females.[6]

Economy

The Durban Metropolitan Area (DMA) has a large and diversified economy with strong manufacturing, tourism, transportation, finance and government sectors. Its coastal location and large port gives it comparative advantage over many other centres in South Africa for export-related industry. Durban's mild climate, warm marine current and culturally diverse population has also provided a drawcard for tourism to the region.

There has, however, been little growth in the number of jobs provided by DMA's formal sector over the past 20 years. The manufacturing sector, which is second only to government in the number of jobs provided, has been shedding jobs as firms restructure and become more capital intensive. High rates of crime have become a disincentive to growth in tourism and many other sectors. Despite a dynamic and growing small and micro business sector, the DMA has very high rates of unemployment, reaching over 30% in some areas of the city. There are still few economic opportunities in the former township areas.

File:Moses Mabhida World Cup Stadium

The central business district has experienced an economic decline due to crime and grime. Many corporates have relocated due to rampant decentralisation, especially to the Umhlanga area north of the city. This region has become a new central business district near the Gateway Theatre of Shopping. Efforts have recently been made to attract business back to the city, with the new Point development south-east of downtown sporting the new uShaka Marine World and many new residential and leisure developments. It is hoped efforts by the city to clean up the business district, new developments in Point and the 2010 FIFA World Cup stadium north of the CBD (Moses Mabidha Stadium) will aid in the economic turnaround.

Durban's economic contribution to the region

The Durban Metropolitan Area is the main economic driver in KwaZulu-Natal, contributing over half of the province's output, employment and income. In national terms, Durban is the second most important economic complex after Gauteng, accounting for 15% of national output, 14% of household income and 11% of national employment. Regional development corridors link Durban northwards to Richards Bay and Maputo, and westward to Pietermaritzburg and Johannesburg.

Informal sector

The City's responses to informal housing have been met with a mixed reaction. The City won two Vuna awards [7][8] but has also been strongly criticised by a report from the United Nations linked Centre on Housing Rights and Evictions.[9] There has also been criticism of the city's treatment of street traders.[10]

Tourism

Communications and media

Two major English-language daily newspapers are published in Durban, both part of the Independent Newspapers, the national group owned by Irish media magnate Tony O'Reilly. These are the morning editions of The Mercury and the afternoon Daily News. Like most news media in South Africa, they have seen declining circulations in recent years. Major Zulu language papers comprise "Isolezwe" ( Independent Newspapers), "UmAfrika" and "Ilanga", the latter being seen to be politically aligned to the IFP. Independent Newspapers also publish "Post", a newspaper aimed largely at the Indian community. A national Sunday paper, the "Sunday Tribune" is also published by Independent Newspapers as is the "Independent on Saturday".

A variety of free weekly suburban newspapers are published by the Caxton Group and there are numerous "community" newspapers, some of which are short lived and others which have had stable tenure.

A major city initiative is the eZasegagasini Metro Gazette ([1]). It is the official newspaper of the eThekwini Municipality, through which ratepayers and residents are kept informed about projects, programmes and activities of the eThekwini Municipality. It is also a forum for readers’ views. Published fortnightly, the newspaper hits the streets on a Friday morning, with 400 000 copies distributed in English and Zulu. The publication is an in-house product of the Municipality’s Communications Department.

A major English language radio station, East Coast Radio ([2]), operates out of Durban and is owned by SA media giant Kagiso Media. The national broadcaster, the SABC, has regional offices in Durban and operates two major stations here, the Zulu language "Ukhozi FM" with a huge national listenership of over 5 million, and Radio Lotus, aimed at "Indian" listeners. The other SABC national stations have smaller regional offices here, as does TV for news links and sports broadcasts. There are a number of smaller stations which are independent, having been granted licences by ICASA, the national agency charged with the issue of broadcast licences.

Sports teams and stadia

Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban South Africa, under construction.

Durban is home to two closely related rugby union teams, the Natal Sharks, who compete in the domestic Currie Cup competition, and the Sharks, who compete in the international Super 14 competition. Both teams play out of the 56,000 capacity Kings Park Stadium - currently known also as the ABSA Stadium for sponsorship reasons.

The City is also home to three clubs in the Premier Soccer LeagueAmaZulu, Thanda Royal Zulu and the Golden Arrows. AmaZulu play most of their home games in their own Princess Magogo Stadium, but will take especially important fixtures to ABSA Stadium. Similarly, the Golden Arrows have their own stadium, King Zwelithini Stadium in the suburb of Umlazi, but play their most important matches in ABSA Stadium. Durban used to be home to a fourth team, Manning Rangers, who won several honours including the league championship.

Sahara Stadium Kingsmead, Durban in 2009.

Durban is also host to the Dolphins, the provincial cricket team. Shaun Pollock, Lance Klusener and Barry Richards all come from the Dolphins (although it was formally called Natal). Cricket in Durban is played at Sahara Stadium Kingsmead.

It has hosted the 2003 ICC Cricket World Cup as one of the host cities which was a huge success. Later it hosted the inaugral season of ICC World Twenty20, which was in 2007. 2009 IPL was played in South Africa and naturally, Durban was selected as a venue.

Durban is one of the host cities of the 2010 FIFA World Cup and is the host of an A1GP motor race, driven on a street track. It is rumoured that Durban will bid for the 2018 Commonwealth Games and the 2020 Summer Olympics[citation needed].

The City is home to Greyville Racecourse, a major Thoroughbred horse racing venue which annually hosts a number of prestigious races including the country's premier event, the July Handicap, and the premier staying event in South Africa, the Gold Cup. Another well-equipped Racecourse is located at Clairwood, just south of the city centre and not far from Durban International Airport.

A professional Tennis venue is located at Westridge Park near The Berea, and an Olympic-standard swimming pool is found in the Kings Park Sporting Precinct. In addition to these venues, Durban has facilities for Water Polo, Hockey, and other sports, most notably the outstanding beach front which has played host to numerous water sports events such as the Mr Price Pro (previously known as the Gunston 500) surfing competition and the related Ocean Action festival. Beach volleyball is regularly played on local beaches and Powerboat racing has taken place in the Harbour. Durban and surrounding areas are also well patronised by Professional and Amateur golfers, with the golf course at Durban Country Club near the CBD being particularly well-known.

Transport

Air

Durban International Airport

Durban International Airport services both domestic and international flights, with regularly-scheduled service to Swaziland, Mozambique, and Mauritius. The airport handled four million passengers in 2005, up over 15 percent from 2004. Plans are at an advanced stage for the construction of a new airport, to be known as King Shaka International Airport, at La Mercy, about 36 kilometres (22 mi) north of the Central Business District, and 15 kilometres north of Umhlanga Rocks.

The airport serves as a major gateway for travellers to KwaZulu-Natal and the Drakensberg.

Sea

Durban harbour

Durban has a long tradition as a port city. The Port of Durban, which was formerly known as the Port of Natal, is one of the few natural harbours between Port Elizabeth and Maputo, and is also located at the beginning of a particular weather phenomenon which can cause extremely violent seas. These two features made Durban an extremely busy port of call for ship repairs when the port was opened in the 1840s. The Port of Durban is now the busiest port in South Africa, as well as the third busiest container port in the Southern Hemisphere.

The modern Port of Durban grew around trade from Johannesburg, as the industrial and mining capital of South Africa is not located on any navigable body of water. Thus, products being shipped from Johannesburg outside of South Africa have to be loaded onto trucks or railways and transported to Durban. The Port of Maputo was unavailable for use until the early 1990s due to civil war and an embargo against South African products. There is now an intense rivalry between Durban and Maputo for shipping business.

Salisbury Island, now joined to the mainland and part of the Port of Durban, was formerly a full naval base until it was downgraded in 2002. It now contains a naval station and other military facilities. The future of the base, however, is uncertain, as there is increasing demand to use Salisbury Island as part of the port facilities.

Rail

Durban is well-served by railways due to its role as the largest trans-shipment point for goods from the interior of South Africa. Shosholoza Meyl, the passenger rail service of Spoornet, operates two long-distance passenger rail services from Durban: a daily service to and from Johannesburg via Pietermaritzburg, and a weekly service to and from Cape Town via Kimberley and Bloemfontein. These trains terminate at Durban Railway Station.

Metrorail operates a commuter rail service in Durban and the surrounding area. The Metrorail network runs from Durban Station outwards as far as Stanger on the north coast, Kelso on the south coast, and Cato Ridge inland.

Roads

Central Durban

The City's main position as a port of entry onto the southern African continent has led to a development of national roads around it. One such highway starts in Durban, and one passes through it. The N3 Western Freeway; which links Durban with the economic hinterland of Gauteng heads west out of the city. The N2 Outer Ring Road links Durban with the Eastern Cape to the south, and Mpumalanga in the north. The Western Freeway is particularly important because freight is shipped by truck to and from the Witwatersrand for transfer to the port.

The N3 Western Freeway starts in the central business district and heads west under Tollgate Bridge and through the suburbs of Sherwood and Mayville. The EB Cloete Interchange (which is informally nicknamed the Spaghetti Junction) lies to the east of Westville, allowing for transfer of traffic between the N2 Outer Ring Road and the Western Freeway.

The N2 Outer Ring Road cuts through the city from the north coast to the south coast. It provides a vital link to the Durban International Airport and to the coastal towns (such as Scottburgh and Stanger) that rely on Durban.

Durban also has a system of freeway and dual arterial metropolitan routes, which connect the sprawling suburbs that lie to the north, west and south of the city. The M4 exists in two segments: The northern segment, named the Leo Boyd Highway, starts as an alternative highway at Ballito where it separates from the N2. It passes through the northern suburbs of Umhlanga and La Lucia where it becomes a dual carriageway and ends at the northern edge of the CBD. The southern segment of the M4, the Albertina Sisulu Highway, starts at the southern edge of the CBD, connecting through to the Durban International Airport, where it once again reconnects with the N2 Outer Ring Road.

The M7 connects the southern industrial basin with the N3 and Pinetown via Queensburgh via the N2. The M19 connects the northern suburbs with Pinetown via Westville.

The M13 is an untolled alternative to the N3 Western Freeway (which is tolled at Mariannhill). It also feeds traffic through Gillitts, Kloof, and Westville. In the Westville area it is called the Jan Smuts Highway, while in the Kloof area it is named the Arthur Hopewell Highway.

Buses

Remant Alton, a company which bought Durban Transport in 2003, operated scheduled bus services throughout the Durban metropolitan area. However, Remant Alton's services were suspended in March 2009 due to violent industrial action by its employees, unroadworthy vehicles and the company's poor financial position.[11] Remant Alton is barely functional, has lost key individuals,[12] suffered the loss of 56 buses in a fire, and had many of the remainder impounded due to unroadworthiness.[citation needed] This has left Durban with a poorly functioning formal public transport system.[citation needed]

The Durban People Mover is a tourist-oriented bus service which runs every 15 minutes and consists of three routes within the central business district and along the beachfront, connecting various attractions.[13]

Several companies run long-distance bus services from Durban to the other cities in South Africa.

Taxis

Durban has two kinds of taxis: metered taxis and minibus taxis. Unlike many cities, metered taxis are not allowed to drive around the city to solicit fares and instead must be called and ordered to a specific location. There are a number of companies which service the Durban and surrounding regions. These taxis can also be called upon for airport transfers, point to point pick ups and shuttles.

Mini bus taxis are the standard form of transport for the majority of the population who cannot afford private cars.[14] Although essential, these taxis are often poorly maintained, and are frequently not road-worthy. These taxis make frequent unscheduled stops to pick up passengers, which cause accidents when drivers to the rear are unable to stop in time.[15][16] With the high demand for transport by the working class of South Africa, minibus taxis are often filled over their legal passenger allowance, making for high casualty rates when minibuses are involved in accidents. Minibuses are generally owned and operated in fleets, and inter-operator violence flares up from time to time, especially as turf wars over lucrative taxi routes occur.[17]

Rickshaws

Durban is also famous for its iconic Zulu Rickshaw pullers navigating throughout the city. These colourful characters are famous for their giant, vibrant hats and costumes. Although they have been a mode of transportation since the early 1900s, they mostly cater to tourists.[citation needed] see also Rickshaw - tourist attractions.

Suburbs

Educational institutions

Private schools

Public schools

Tertiary institutions

Howard College Campus Tower in Durban, University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Churches

Lambert Road Baptist Church

International relations

Twin towns — Sister cities

Durban is twinned with:[20]

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b Municipal Demarcation Board, South Africa Retrieved on 2008-03-23.
  2. ^ a b Statistics South Africa, Community Survey, 2007, Basic Results Municipalities (pdf-file) Retrieved on 2008-03-23.
  3. ^ Adrian Koopman. "The Names and the Naming of Durban". Natalia, the Journal of the Natal Society. Archived from the original on 2007-11-03. http://web.archive.org/web/20071103144254/http://www.durban.gov.za/durban/discover-durban/our-durban/history/naming. Retrieved 2008-07-09. 
  4. ^ ngopulse
  5. ^ a b "Climate Data for Durban". South African Weather Service. http://old.weathersa.co.za/Climat/Climstats/DurbanStats.jsp. Retrieved 6 March 2010. 
  6. ^ a b c (Statistics South Africa Census 2001)
  7. ^ "The Vuna Awards". Department of Provincial and Local Government, Republic of South Africa. http://www.thedplg.gov.za/vuna/. 
  8. ^ "Why eThekwini Municipality won the Vuna Award for best run metropolitan". Ethekwini Municipality Communications Department. http://www.durban.gov.za/durban/government/munadmin/media/press/best_run/view. 
  9. ^ Cohre
  10. ^ From best practice to Pariah: the case of Durban, South Africa by Pat Horn, Street Net
  11. ^ eThekwini Municipality (2009-03-13). "Notice From Remant Alton — Suspension Of Bus Commuter Service". http://www.durban.gov.za/durban/government/munadmin/media/press/pressitem.2009-03-13.2537462746/view. Retrieved 2009-05-03. 
  12. ^ Independent Online. "Chief resigns in face of bus crisis". IOL. http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&click_id=13&art_id=vn20070420104248892C358861. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  13. ^ Durban People Mover. "Durban People Mover ... The future begins here". http://durbanpeoplemover.co.za/. Retrieved 2009-05-03. 
  14. ^ "Transport". CapeTown.org. http://www.cape-town.org/directory.asp?McatId=8. 
  15. ^ "South Africa's minibus wars: uncontrollable law-defying minibuses oust buses and trains from transit". LookSmart. Archived from the original on 2007-12-06. http://web.archive.org/web/20071206115024/http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_go1566/is_200209/ai_n7215423. 
  16. ^ "Transportation in Developing Countries: Greenhouse Gas Scenarios of south alabama". Pew Center. http://www.pewclimate.org/global-warming-in-depth/all_reports/transportation_in_south_africa/trans_sa_execsumm.cfm. 
  17. ^ "Taxing Alternatives: Poverty Alleviation and the South African Taxi/Minibus Industry". Enterprise Africa! Research Publications. Archived from the original on 2006-08-25. http://web.archive.org/web/20060825221354/http://www.aworldconnected.org/article.php/1341.html. 
  18. ^ Isipingo Secondary School
  19. ^ Virginia Preparatory School
  20. ^ "Sister Cities Home Page". http://www.durban.gov.za/durban/government/igr/idr/sister.  eThekwini Online: The Official Site of the City of Durban
  21. ^ "Sister Cities of Guangzhou". Guangzhou Foreign Affairs Office. http://www.gzwaishi.gov.cn/Item/3970.aspx. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Durban beach front.
Durban beach front.

Durban [1] is located on the east coast of South Africa in the province of KwaZulu-Natal and in the municipality of eThekwini. It is the third largest city in South Africa and the busiest port in Africa. According to the 2007 Community Survey, the population of the eThekwini municpality was 3,468,086 [2].

Understand

Durban was originally called Port Natal, and was founded by British settlers. Indian workers were brought in to work the sugar cane plantations, making this one of the largest population centres of Indians in South Africa. Zulu and English are the most common languages in Durban.

Image:FIFA2010Host.png
Moses Mabida Stadium


World Cup 2010
FIFA South Africa 2010

Get in

By plane

Durban International Airport (formerly Louis Botha Airport) is located 15km southwest of the city center.

The following airlines offer domestic service to/from Durban: 1time [3], Airlink [4], British Airways [5], Interlink [6], Kulula [7], Mango [8], and South African Airlines [9]

The following airlines offer international service to/from Durban: Airlink [10] (to/from Maputo), Air Mauritius [11] (to/from Mauritius), and Emirates [12] (to/from Dubai),

A new international airport is under construction 40km North of the city at La mercy and due to be operational in time for the Soccer world cup in 2010. See also Discount airlines in Africa.

By bus

All national carriers and the Baz Bus offer regular services to Durban.

By train

The central train station is in the city centre.

Spoornet [13] operates daily inter-city trains to Johannesburg and Pietermaritzburg, with a weekly service to Bloemfontein, Kimberley and Cape Town. You can also get to Port Elizabeth or East London by changing trains in Bloemfontein.

MetroRail [14] operates frequent commuter trains to various suburbs of Durban and towns nearby (such as Pinetown and the resort towns of both the south coast (eg. Kelso and Park Ryne) and the north coast).

By boat

Some cruise ships dock in Durban, but generally there are limited "one-way" entries by boat to Durban. In theory passage on a freighter might be arranged, but it's not widely advertised. Cruises from Durban available on the MSC Sinfonia [15].

Get around

By car

The best way to get around Durban is by car.

  • CABS Car hire, +27 (0)21 386 5500 (, fax: +27 (0)21 385 1110), [17]. Branches at all major airports in South Africa  edit
  • JNC Helicopters, Hangar 1, Virginia Airport Glenashley, +27 (0)31 563-9513 (), [19]. JNC Helicopters offers VIP travel to and from any South African city as well as an infinite number of tourist flight combinations, from 20min sight seeing flights to complete tours that take you around any part of South Africa.  edit

By bus

Durban is attempting to upgrade its public bus system in time for the world cup; however, problems with the union sometimes makes buses unreliable.

Durban People Mover [20] buses feature CCTV cameras and wheelchair-friendly ramps. They run from 6AM until 11PM every 15 minutes. These buses stop in the CBD, the Victoria Street Market, the Workshop, Suncoast Casino, Ushaka Marine World and along the beach route. (R4 per trip, valid for 1 hour on a hop-on, hop-off basis).

To travel between the Berea surbubs and the city its cheaper to travel by Mynah buses, R2.40 off peak (8AM 3:30PM), peak R3.80. The Mynah buses depart from the Workshop terminus every 15/20 minutes to Musgrave, The Ridge, Kensington, Mitchell Park/Florida road, Tollgate(cnr Aliwal/Smith streets), To South Beach/Ushaka, North Beach/Suncoast (in Pixley ka Seme {west} street, opposite the City Hall).

The Aqualine buses to the suburbs (depart from the Pine street terminus ) are usually within 5 minutes of the schedule every hour.Peak cash fare can be quite steep. If you're travelling daily by bus to work,its advisable to buy a weekly coupon, which can save you up to 35% of the cash fare. Fare, bus route & time table enquiries (+27 (0)31 309-5942/3).

  • To Bluff (route 330/338/411/418 )
  • To Queensburgh catch either one of these four buses, Malvern (route 112), Montgomery road (route 113), Shalcross/Hillview (route 140), Pinetown/Westmead (route 840/842/843/849).
  • To Glenwood catch either one of these four buses, Berea Beach (route 022/023), Umbilo (route 007),Glenmore (route 086), Manor Gardens (route 084).
  • To Umhlanga Rocks/Gateway Mall catch the Aqualine bus(route 716/705)outside Nando's in Pixley ka Seme (West) street, departs every hour.
  • To UKZN catch the Howard College bus (route 070)/Westville campus (route 075).
  • To Pinetown/Westville central/Westwood mall, catch Aqualine Pinetown/Westmead bus (route 855,857,858,870,871,873,877,886).
  • To The Pavilion mall catch the Aqualine bus (route 853/860 )route 853 departs from the Workshop terminus and route 860 departs from North Beach near Blue Waters hotel/Suncoast casino.

Most buses depart on the hour every hour, check the bus schedule. Please note that sometimes to get to your destination, you might have to catch a couple to three buses. When not sure about bus route number, ask the locals or the bus driver (tell him the nearest landmark to your destination). Mynah buses do not have route numbers, only the destination will be displayed on the electronic display in front of the bus. Please note that u must flag the bus down to stop at the bus stop. It is advisable to have the exact change before you board the bus and get a receipt!

By metered taxi

Registered taxis are common, generally safe and relatively inexpensive. Taxis do not rove and hence need to be called so that one can be fetched from your pick up point. A lot of these will conduct point to point transfers, airport shuttles, and corporate transfers. The ones that can be recommended for the Durban and surrounds are:

  • Umhlanga Rocks Taxis (Ucabs), ph: +27 (0)31 561-1846, [21]
  • Eagle Taxi's, ph: +27 (0)31 337-8333
  • Zippy Cabs, +27 (0)31 202-7067, [22]
  • Mozzie Cabs, +27 (0)31 303-5787 (local toll share: 086 066-9943), [23]

By minibus taxi

There are also group taxis, referred to as "combi taxis" (or "minibus taxis"), that are impossible to miss as (in Durban) they're brightly decorated and always have music pumping. There is always someone hanging out of a window making the hand gestures that indicate whether there are seats available and where the combi is going. Minibus taxis are very common and less expensive than metered taxis. Strictly speaking, they are minibuses that take people to and from work, they stick to set routes and they are generally not suitable for tourists unfamiliar with the area they are going to; when in doubt stick to metered taxis or buses. There are minibus taxis plying same routes as Mynah buses,They are more frequent and faster then buses.

By Rickshaw

Rickshaw rides are offered to tourists along the beach front, for amusement rather than getting around. Watch out for the many ups and downs in the ride; the tipping back of the rickshaw cause the contents of your pockets to fall out, into the coffers of the drivers!

  • Durban Botanical Gardens, +27 (0)31 201-1303 (, fax: +27 (0)31 309-1271), [24]. Visit on a Saturday and see a mixture of Cultural weddings all having their photos taken  edit
  • Berea. This is a long ridge overlooking the harbor, city center and beaches. Once covered with coastal forest, it is now completely built up.  edit
  • City Hall. There is an art gallery and outdated science museum inside, as well a a public library.
  • The Golden Mile The Golden Mile, the nickname for the beaches near downtown that stretch along the Indian Ocean, is well known for it's excellent surfing, occasional shark attack and wide sandy beaches. Visiting around the Christmas holidays ensures a crowded experience, complete with stations for missing children, but visit at the off season and you'll practically have the place to yourself, save the serious surfers. There are also play pools and playgrounds for children along the waterfront, as well as hotel, bars and restaurants.
  • Crocodile Creek.  edit
  • Mahatma Gandhi Settlement. Tours Available  edit
  • Durban North Japanese Gardens, +27 (0)31 563-1333. Free entrance.  edit
  • KwaZulu Natal National Parks [25]
uShaka Marine World
uShaka Marine World
Dolphin Show at uShaka Marine World
Dolphin Show at uShaka Marine World
  • Watersports. Swim, surf, canoe, snorkel, dive  edit
  • Calypso Dive & Adventure Center, [26]. Scuba Dive at uShaka Marine World. PADI 5 Star Instructor Development Center. Dive to wrecks, caves, offshore reefs. Offers 6-month "From Zero to Hero" carrer dive course.  edit
  • Skydive Durban, Pietermaritzburg Airport, 072 214 6040, [27]. Take a 25 minute plane ride, then 35 seconsd of freefalling before the parchute opens, then a post-jump barbeque. Tandem Jump: R1,350; DVD: R400.  edit
  • NAC Helicopters Unlimited, Hangar No 4, Virginia Airport, +27 (0)31 564-0176 (fax: +27 (0)31 563-0037), [28]. helicopter rides  edit
  • Sibaya Casino (Sun international).  edit
  • Fitzsimons Snake Park, 240A Lower Marine Parade, North Beach (next to Mini Town), +27' (0)31 337-6456 (fax: +27 (0)31 337-3125), [29]. Open daily 9AM-4:30PM..  edit
  • uShaka Marine World, 1 Bell Street, +27 (0)31 328-8000, [30]. To see the HUGE Aquarium or ride more than eight different rides in the Waterworld.  edit
  • Glenholme trail for disabled & blind persons, Glenholme Nature Reserve, +27 (0)031705-5448. Caters for wheelchairs and the blind with elevated walkway and guide rails and braille plaques.   edit
  • Nature Parks - There are dozens of nature reserves in the suburbs, just ask around. Please remember to be safe, there are natural hazards like snakes, and criminals like the isolation for different reasons.
  • Durban A1GP A1 Grand Prix, [31]. Watch the A1 Grand Prix (800 m from the Durban CBD and 300m from the North Beach coastline close to the Suncoast Casino and Entertainment World) Brickhill Road. The only road race on the world circuit.  edit
  • Greyville Race Course. Horseracing  edit
  • Surf Artificial Waves. At Gateway Shopping Center  edit
  • Shark Institute. Take a boat to see the shark nets that protect beachcombers from shark attack.  edit
  • Historical compensation sugar mill.  edit
  • Zimbali Golf Estate. 18 holes  edit
  • Durban Tourism (Tourist Junction), 160 Monty Naicker Road, +27 (0)31 3044-934. The City's official tourism body can provide you with maps, accommodation information and general guidance around your trip to Durban. Tour guides, registered tour operators and approved accommodation form part of Durban Tourism's extensive services.  edit
  • Poetry Africa [33] - International Festival of Poetry. Early October every year.
  • Time of the Writer [34] - International Festival of Writing - March every year.
  • Durban International Film Festival [35] - International Festival of Film - July/August every year.
  • Jomba! Contemporary Dance Festival [36] - International Festival of Contempary Dance - every year.
  • Awesome Africa [37] - World Music Festival - September every year.
  • MTN Durban Fashion Week [38] - For all fashion-lovers! June every year. For all fashion-lovers!
  • Durban July [39] - July every year.Africa's Premier Horse-Racing Event, with plenty of celebrities and walking fashion models to bump into.
  • Hindu Festivals - There are dozens of these and you'll need to ask around because they're not well publicised, but there's one in Easter in the Umbilo area where devotees walk on hot coals, and another sometime between February and July (it moves) called Kavady where the devotees pierce their backs with hooks and drag decorated portable shrines. Not to be missed!

Buy

Popular items to buy are Zulu beadwork, wirework, wicker work - from baskets and sustainable conference bags to fantastic lights and furniture, Spices - anyone dare 'mother-in-law's revenge' ? Fantastic!

  • Gateway Mall, the largest in the southern hemisphere
  • Victoria Street Market. Mostly oriental souvenirs. Haggle hard, beware of pickpockets.
  • Essenwood Craft Market - For a true taste of South Africa look out for a guy selling biltong (South African jerky). A good place to buy curios, and don't be afraid to haggle. Last time I was there I found some beautiful Zimbabwean soap-stone sculptures at a very good price.
  • The Pavilion - A large shopping mall with a good range of shops.
  • African Arts Center at Tourist Junction on West Street
  • BAT Center on the harbor front

Eat

As Durban has one of the largest Indian populations outside of India itself, a Durban curry is a popular dish and can range from mild to very hot. There is also the Bunny Chow which is unique to the city, a quarter loaf of bread hollowed out and filled with a curry of your choice. Check out the Workshop restaurants for some of the best bunny chow in the city. Or head over to the Indian neighborhood near Victoria Market for more authentic Durban Indian food.

Good Indian dining is at Vintage Restaurant next to Bean Bag Bohemia - Windemere Road

Try the Roma Revolving Restaurant at the top of John Ross House on the Esplanade for Italian food and the best view of Durban.

Wilson's Wharf a long pier build into the harbour, hosts a wide selection of international restaurants and watch the busiest harbor in Africa's activity. Take in a show afterwards at the upstairs Catalina theater.

Try Morningside restaurants, along Florida Road, for trendy cafe sidewalk eateries including one Italian style, Spiga d'Oro , frequented so often by South Africa's notorious businessman, Schabir Shaik, that a dish is named in his honor 'Pasta a la Shaik'. Bill Clinton and Bill Gates ate at "Spice" set off the busy street in a quiet upstairs courtyard. And nearby, be nearly guaranteed to rub shoulders with the up-and-coming in-crowd at the Bean Bag Bohemia, Windermere Road, a restaurant that makes great dining an artistic event.

Definitely try some 'biltong' when you're in South Africa. Its South African-style jerky and available in a whole range of flavors and textures.

  • Florida Road. Definitely the happening street in Durban. Restaurants, Bars Cafe's Boutique shopping the in happy friendly Durban hang out. Durban's most interesting book shop, Book Base also located at the top of Florida Road (275) and is open every day. Lots of interesting material of historical interest, Zulu Wars etc to be seen ph:+27(0)31312355.  edit

Zacks, located at Wilson's wharf on Victoria's embankment is a popular place to get thirst quenching drinks and just relax and enjoy the view of the harbor. Joe Kool's, on the beachfront is also well known as the best place for a "sundowner" after a long day on the beach. Check out their roof-top deck for the best views. The BAT Centre, on the port is also a good place for a quick meal or drink. There's free jazz most nights as well as other concerts, hip-hop and the occasional poetry slam. The Firkin is a micro-brewery on the top floor of the Pavilion shopping centre in Westville. It has some great ales and beers and good snacks at reasonable prices.Tilted house is a trendy place situated in the city center in an old victorian house. It has it`s own VIP section, but it is open to the beautiful as well as important. Cool Runnings is a reggeaton place with cheap beer and a relaxed athmosphere. Burn is a good concert scene for Metal and Rock music with club evenings every weekend. Durban is known for it`s pot and you will easily find it around the clubs, but beware that the police does care if tourists break the law and you can be thrown out of the country if you are caught with it.

This guide uses the following price ranges for a standard double room:
Budget Under R500
Mid-range R500 to R1000
Splurge Over R1000
  • African Sunrise Backpackers & Lodge, (Valley of 1000 Hills), (), [40]. Artery Rock Cottages located outside Durban. Dorm bed: R100; Doubles: R320; Camping: R60.  edit
  • Antseys Bach Backpakcers International, 477 marine Drive, Bluff, [41]. Run by Palmbloom family. Great atmosphere. Surf lessons, pool table, table tennis, dartboard, paintball, swimming pool, DVDs, beach horse rides, dive courses, braai, golf, kite/windsurfing, dolphin/whale watching. Dorm bed: R90, Doubles/Twins: R210; Camping: R50.  edit
  • Banana Backpackers, Pine Street and Prince Alfred Road, +27 (0)31 368-4062, [42]. Close to the beach, the ICC, the mall and the city center. Pool, bar, internet, DSTV, laundry. Shuttle service. Tour booking.  edit
  • Black Mamba Backpackers Lodge, (Valley of 1000 Hills, Close to Tala Game Reserve and Phezulu Crocodile Farm), 031 765 4063, [43]. Jacuzzi under the stars, shower in the open air, snuggle around the bonfire. Free airport and shopping cneter pick ups/drop offs, free internet, kitchen, bar. Dorm bed: R80; Doubles R280; Camping R50, 3rd night is free.  edit
  • Gibela Backpackers Lodge, +27 (0)31 303-6291 (), [44]. This lodge has placed itself high with international and local travellers alike. It is a 4 star graded property by the South African Tourism Grading Council and is the 2008 winner in the South African Tourism Welcome Awards - Backpacking. It is also offers a totally smoke free environment, including the garden. FromR150pps, R400/unit.  edit
  • Happy Hippo, 222 Point Rd (Mahatma Ghandi Road), Waterfront, +27 (0)31 718-1196, [45]. Located 500m from the beach, but not the safest area. Rooftop bar, wi-fi. Kitchen, nice rooms. Dorm bed: R100; Doubles: R270; Ensuite doubles R390.  edit
  • Hippo Hide, 2 Jesmond Road, Berea, +27 (0)31 207-4366, [46]. Private wooden huts, entertainment area. Dorm: R95, single: R170, double and twin: R240, triple and en-suite double rooms R310.  edit
  • Nomads Backpackers, 70 Essenwood Rd, +27 (0)31 202-9709, [47]. Since 1995. Log beds. Fans. Bambooza bar & Restaurant. Dor bed: R100; Doubles/Twins: R280; Triple: R300.  edit
  • On The Beach, [48]. Luxurious ensuite rooms with sea view. Air-conditioned dorms. Walking distance to La Lucia Mall. Dorm bed: R120; Doubles: R470..  edit
  • Shelbourne Lodge Bed 'n Breakfast, La Lucia, +27 (0)31 562-1282, [49]. R350pps.  edit
  • Smiths Cottage, [50]. Cozy and tranquil, with pool and tropical garden. Shuttle service. Dorm bed: R110; Doubles: R275; Cottage: R600.  edit
  • Tekweni Backpackers, 169 9th Avenue, +27 (31) 303 1433 (), [51]. The most fun place to stay in Durban. Offers local tours, barbeques, walking distance to Durban Stattion. Dorm bed: R110, Single room: R300, Double room: R350.  edit
  • Dolphin Sands B&B, North Beach Rd, Westbrook, +27 (0)32 943-1023, [53]. From R300pps.  edit
  • Nunuburd Lodge, 74 Clair Avenue, Manor Ridge, [54]. Doubles/Twins: R190pp; Triples: R170pp, Quads: R160pp.  edit
  • Royal Palm - Gateway, 08 Palm Boulevard, Umhlanga, +27 (0)31 581-8000, [55]. From R970pps.  edit
  • The Royal Hotel, 267 Smith St, +27 (0)31 333-6000, [56]. From R1,330pps.  edit
  • Durban Self Catering Accommodation, [60]. An Exclusive Private Beach House, With sea views spanning from Ballito in the North, to the Durban Point and light house in the South. The part of the beach it is on is usually very quiet. From R950.  edit
Mounted police
Mounted police

The beach strip is frequently patrolled by policemen, there are CCTV cameras and there's ample lighting at night. As in all countries, there are several basic safety rules to follow. Avoid dark, deserted areas, and do not go out alone in the early hours of the morning. The promanade along the beach is safe to walk, but do not venture to the side and back roads of the hotels. Avoid the Point Road area - day and night time.

At night: It is still a good idea to stick to the main streets and not go out at night unless you are very familiar with a particular area. Avoid the usually busy central business district, which is empty after dark. Above all, use common sense.

Remember, you're a tourist, not a 70s celebrity. Dress down to blend in with the people in the CBD (keep the fancy stuff to a minimum).

The harbour area is quite safe, as are the shopping malls and higher residential areas.

The Point, the area between downtown and the port, known for prostitution and cheap hotels has higher crime rate (although parts are currently undergoing a massive redevelopment). Avoid walking here alone or at night and take cars or metered taxis if you need to go to this area. Point Road has been renamed Mahatma Gandhi Road. Despite the new name and the image the city is trying to project it is probably better to keep clear of this area.

Street children can be a problem, and its best to keep clear of them. Many sniff glue, carry knives, and can be quite unpredictable.

HIV/AIDs is very common in South Africa, so observe standard precautions. Assuming that everyone is HIV positive is not an unreasonable precaution.

  • Travel vaccines and general practitioner services available at Umhlanga Sports and Travel Clinic [61] Umhlanga Hospital Helipad, 323 Umhlanga Rocks Drive, Umhlanga Rocks. +27 31 560 5569
This is a usable article. It has information for getting in as well as some complete entries for restaurants and hotels. An adventurous person could use this article, but please plunge forward and help it grow!

1911 encyclopedia

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

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Wikipedia

Pronunciation

Proper noun

Durban

  1. Seaport in Natal Province, Republic of South Africa.

Translations

Anagrams


Bosnian

Proper noun

Durban m.

  1. Durban

Serbian

Proper noun

Durban m.

  1. Durban

See also


Simple English

Durban (Zulu: eThekwini (IPA: [ˈɛːʔtɛˌkwinĭ]) is the second most populous city in South Africa. It is part of the province KwaZulu Natal.

Durban
eThekwini
Coordinates: 29°53′S 31°03′E / 29.883°S 31.05°E / -29.883; 31.05
Country South Africa
Province KwaZulu-Natal
Established 1835
Government
 - Mayor Obed Mlaba
Area
 - Total 2,292 km2 (884.9 sq mi)
Population (2004)
 - Total 3,346,799
 Density 1,460/km2 (3,781.4/sq mi)
Time zone SAST (UTC+2)
Area code(s) 031
Website Official Durban city website

Contents

History

It is thought that the first known inhabitants of the Durban area arrived from the north around 100,000 BC, according to carbon dating of rock art found in caves in the Drakensberg. These people lived in the central plains of KwaZulu-Natal until the expansion of Bantu people from the north sometime during the last millennium.

Sister cities

Durban's sister cities are:

Partner Cities

References

Other websites

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