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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An e-mail letter is a letter which sent as an e-mail using a computer then printed out and delivered as a traditional (physical) letter. It is a communication means between the virtual cyber- and the material real world.[1]

The printer or mail transfer agent prints the electronic mail on paper, the mail transport agent packs it into an envelope and the mail delivery agent or postman delivers it to the receiver's mailbox. Generally there is a fee for this service; however very small amounts and single E-mail letters may be free of charge depending on the service provider.

Contents

L- or Letter Mail

L-Mail, Lmail or "letter mail" is a method of sending a real physical letter via a web page.[2][3][4]

An L-Mail system typically enables individuals and companies to send mail internationally directly from their computers, requiring only Internet access and a browser. In a first step, the user defines the letter format and then composes the text. Subsequently, the data is transmitted via a network to a printing centre chosen by the user, preferably in the vicinity of the addressee, where the letter is printed, put in an envelope and fed into the postal system.

Because letters are posted locally to the recipient, a faster speed of delivery can be achieved than by traditional air mail.[3] With local postage being paid, costs can also be less than an equivalent air mail letter.[3]

Letter E-Mail

The reverse scenario, where people send real letters and you get them as emails on your computer. Post-mail called this service postbutler, which has been terminated.

Letter mail vs. letter e-mail

The differences between term letter mail and letter e-mail might be slightly confusing. L-mail, or letter mail is designed on a web page and delivered to the recipient as a real letter. Letter e-mail on the other hand is written and composed as a real letter and is delivered as e-mail.

Service providers

The Swiss Post offered the services e-mail letter and letter e-mail (postbutler) until 7 December 2008 20:00 when the e-mail letter was shut down because of small usage and negative customer feedback. Letter e-mail (postbutler) was shut down without notice but is going to be back under yet another different name. More service providers are listed under external links.

E-Snailer is a service that allows internet users to send short letters through the US Postal Service for free, after being subjected to advertisements. A postscript is added to each letter, telling the recipient that it was sent via E-Snailer.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ E-Mail Letter postmail.ch (German language)
  2. ^ l-mail.com
  3. ^ a b c L-mail offers snail mail web interface: Deliver the letter, the sooner the better by Stephen West, The Register, 30th September 2004 .
  4. ^ New mail service relies on open source tools by Tina Gasperson, October 06, 2004; Linux.com.
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An e-mail letter is a letter which sent as an e-mail using a computer then printed out and delivered as a traditional (physical) letter. It is a communication means between the virtual cyber- and the material real world.[1]

The printer or mail transfer agent prints the electronic mail on paper, the mail transport agent packs it into an envelope and the mail delivery agent or postman delivers it to the receiver's mailbox. Generally there is a fee for this service; however very small amounts and single E-mail letters may be free of charge depending on the service provider.

Contents

L- or Letter Mail

L-Mail, Lmail or "letter mail" is a method of sending a real physical letter via a web page.[2][3][4]

An L-Mail system typically enables individuals and companies to send mail internationally directly from their computers, requiring only Internet access and a browser. In a first step, the user defines the letter format and then composes the text. Subsequently, the data is transmitted via a network to a printing centre chosen by the user, preferably in the vicinity of the addressee, where the letter is printed, put in an envelope and fed into the postal system.

Because letters are posted locally to the recipient, a faster speed of delivery can be achieved than by traditional air mail.[3] With local postage being paid, costs can also be less than an equivalent air mail letter.[3]

Letter E-Mail

The reverse scenario, where people send real letters and you get them as emails on your computer. Post-mail called this service postbutler, which has been terminated.

Letter mail vs. letter e-mail

The differences between term letter mail and letter e-mail might be slightly confusing. L-mail, or letter mail is designed on a web page and delivered to the recipient as a real letter. Letter e-mail on the other hand is written and composed as a real letter and is delivered as e-mail.

Service providers

The Swiss Post offered the services e-mail letter and letter e-mail (postbutler) until 7 December 2008 20:00 when the e-mail letter was shut down because of small usage and negative customer feedback. Letter e-mail (postbutler) was shut down without notice but is going to be back under yet another different name.[citation needed] More service providers are listed under external links.

E-Snailer is a service that allows internet users to send short letters through the US Postal Service for free, after being subjected to advertisements. A postscript is added to each letter, telling the recipient that it was sent via E-Snailer.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ E-Mail Letter postmail.ch (German language)
  2. ^ l-mail.com
  3. ^ a b c L-mail offers snail mail web interface: Deliver the letter, the sooner the better by Stephen West, The Register, 30th September 2004 .
  4. ^ New mail service relies on open source tools by Tina Gasperson, October 06, 2004; Linux.com.


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