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East-West Shrine Game
Teams East, West
Originated 1925
Series West leads 45-34-5
Current Champion East
West (45) East (34)
1925 1927-J
1927-D 1930-D
1933 1934
1935 1939
1940 1941
1945 1947
1950 1954
1956 1957
1960-J 1961
1965-J 1965-D
1968 1969
1971-J 1971-D
1976 1977-J
1977-D 1980
1982 1985
1987 1988
1990 1991
1992 1994
1995 1996
1998 2001
2002 2004
2006 2007
2008
1928 1930-J
1932 1936
1937 1943
1948 1949-J
1949-D 1951
1952 1955-J
1955-D 1958
1960-D 1962
1966 1967
1972 1973
1974 1979
1981 1983
1984 1986
1989 1993
1997 1999
2000 2003
2005 2009
Ties (5)
1938 1942
1944 1946
1963
For years when two games were played in one calendar
year, (J) denotes January and (D) denotes December.

The East-West Shrine Game is an annual post-season college football all-star game played each January since 1925. The game is sponsored by the fraternal group Nobles of the Mystic Shrine and the net proceeds are earmarked to some of the Shrine's charitable works, most notably the Shriners Hospitals for Children. The game's slogan is Strong Legs Run That Weak Legs May Walk.

The game matches teams of players who attended college in the Eastern United States against those schooled in the Western United States. The game, and especially the practice sessions leading up to it, attracts dozens of scouts from professional teams. Since 1985, Canadian players playing in Canadian university football have also been invited (even though the CIS and NCAA play by different football codes). As such, this is the only bowl game in either the Canadian or American college football schedules to include players from both Canadian and American universities.

The game is often played well into the month of January so that even players from teams whose schools were involved in bowl games can participate, which is important, as these teams often have some of the very best players.

Contents

History

For most of its history, the game has always been played in the San Francisco Bay Area, historically at San Francisco's Kezar Stadium and at Stanford Stadium. In recent years it has been played at SBC Park. For several years there was a similar game in Miami, Florida at the Miami Orange Bowl, also sponsored by the Shrine, involving teams from the North and South (the North-South Shrine Game).

In 2006, the game was played in the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, moving out of the San Francisco area for the first time in decades. The growth of cable television meant that NFL scouts could now view players around the country, making postseason all-star games less important. Even so, the Shrine Game's organizers had relaxed efforts towards attracting top players to the game, meaning that many of college football's best players went to the Senior Bowl instead.

The Shrine Game moved once again to Houston, Texas for its 2007 event. The game was moved to Reliant Stadium, which plays home to the Houston Texans (NFL), to be closer to one of the 22 Shriners Hospitals for Children. Texas is home to two Shriner's hospitals: one being in Houston, while the other hospital is 50 miles towards the Gulf of Mexico in Galveston. Due to the lack of available dates for Reliant Stadium (another event is being scheduled for the available date, January 19, 2008), the game is being played that day at Robertson Stadium on the campus of the University of Houston.

Game results

The West currently leads all-time with 45 wins, the East has 34 wins, and five games have tied.[1]

# Date Winner Score Location
1  December 26, 1925  West 7-0 San Francisco, CA
2 January 1, 1927 West 7-3   San Francisco, CA  
3 December 26, 1927 West 16-6 San Francisco, CA
4 December 29, 1928 East 20-0 San Francisco, CA
5 January 1, 1930 East 19-7 San Francisco, CA
6 December 27, 1930 West 3-0 San Francisco, CA
7 January 1, 1932 East 6-0 San Francisco, CA
8 January 2, 1933 West 21-13 San Francisco, CA
9 January 1, 1934 West 12-0 San Francisco, CA
10 January 1, 1935 West 19-13 San Francisco, CA
11 January 1, 1936 East 19-3 San Francisco, CA
12 January 1, 1937 East 3-0 San Francisco, CA
13 January 1, 1938 Tie 0-0 San Francisco, CA
14 January 2, 1939 West 14-0 San Francisco, CA
15 January 1, 1940 West 28-11 San Francisco, CA
16 January 1, 1941 West 20-14 San Francisco, CA
17 January 3, 1942 Tie 6-6 San Francisco, CA
18 January 1, 1943 East 13-12 New Orleans, LA
19 January 1, 1944 Tie 13-13 San Francisco, CA
20 January 1, 1945 West 13-7 San Francisco, CA
21 January 1, 1946 Tie 7-7 San Francisco, CA
22 January 1, 1947 West 13-9 San Francisco, CA
23 January 1, 1948 East 40-9 San Francisco, CA
24 January 1, 1949 East 14-12 San Francisco, CA
25 December 31, 1949 East 28-6 San Francisco, CA
26 December 30, 1950 West 16-7 San Francisco, CA
27 December 29, 1951 East 15-14 San Francisco, CA
28 December 27, 1952 East 21-20 San Francisco, CA
29 January 2, 1954 West 31-7 San Francisco, CA
30 January 1, 1955 East 13-12 San Francisco, CA
31 December 31, 1955 East 29-6 San Francisco, CA
32 December 29, 1956 West 7-6 San Francisco, CA
33 December 28, 1957 West 27-13 San Francisco, CA
34 December 27, 1958 East 26-14 San Francisco, CA
35 January 2, 1960 West 21-14 San Francisco, CA
36 December 31, 1960 East 7-0 San Francisco, CA
37 December 30, 1961 West 21-8 San Francisco, CA
38 December 29, 1962 East 25-19 San Francisco, CA
39 December 28, 1963 Tie 6-6 San Francisco, CA
40 January 2, 1965 West 11-7 San Francisco, CA
41 December 31, 1965 West 22-7 San Francisco, CA
42 December 31, 1966 East 45-22 San Francisco, CA
 
# Date Winner Score Location
43  December 30, 1967  East 16-14  San Francisco, CA 
44 December 28, 1968 West 18-7 San Francisco, CA
45 December 27, 1969 West 15-0 Palo Alto, CA
46 January 2, 1971 West 17-13 Oakland, CA
47 December 31, 1971 West 17-13 San Francisco, CA
48 December 30, 1972 East 9-3 San Francisco, CA
49 December 29, 1973 East 35-7 San Francisco, CA
50 December 28, 1974 East 16-14 Palo Alto, CA
51 January 3, 1976 West 21-14 Palo Alto, CA
52 January 2, 1977 West 30-14 Palo Alto, CA
53 December 31, 1977 West 23-3 Palo Alto, CA
54 January 6, 1979 East 56-17 Palo Alto, CA
55 January 5, 1980 West 20-10 Palo Alto, CA
56 January 10, 1981 East 21-3 Palo Alto, CA
57 January 9, 1982 West 20-13 Palo Alto, CA
58 January 15, 1983 East 26-25 Palo Alto, CA
59 January 7, 1984 East 27-19 Palo Alto, CA
60 January 5, 1985 West 21-10 Palo Alto, CA
61 January 11, 1986 East 18-7 Palo Alto, CA
62 January 10, 1987 West 24-21 Palo Alto, CA
63 January 16, 1988 West 16-13 Palo Alto, CA
64 January 15, 1989 East 24-6 Palo Alto, CA
65 January 21, 1990 West 22-21 Palo Alto, CA
66 January 26, 1991 West 24-21 Palo Alto, CA
67 January 19, 1992 West 14-6 Palo Alto, CA
68 January 24, 1993 East 31-17 Palo Alto, CA
69 January 15, 1994 West 29-28 Palo Alto, CA
70 January 14, 1995 West 30-28 Palo Alto, CA
71 January 13, 1996 West 17-13 Palo Alto, CA
72 January 11, 1997 East 17-13 Palo Alto, CA
73 January 10, 1998 West 24-7 Palo Alto, CA
74 January 16, 1999 East 20-10 Palo Alto, CA
75 January 15, 2000 East 35-21 Palo Alto, CA
76 January 13, 2001 West 20-10 San Francisco, CA
77 January 12, 2002 West 21-13 San Francisco, CA
78 January 11, 2003 East 20-17 San Francisco, CA
79 January 10, 2004 West 28-7 San Francisco, CA
80 January 15, 2005 East 45-27 San Francisco, CA
81 January 21, 2006 West 35-31 San Antonio, TX
82 January 20, 2007 West 21-3 Houston, TX
83 January 19, 2008 West 31-13 Houston, TX
84 January 17, 2009 East 24-19 Houston, TX
85 January 23, 2010 TBD TBD Orlando, FL

Canadian invitees

Despite the fact that the Shrine Game is an American football competition, players playing in Canadian university football, which play under Canadian football rules, have been invited every year since 1985. Because of this, the Shrine Game is the only game on either the Canadian or American college football schedules in which players from both sides of the border compete with or against each other. No American university currently has a Canadian football program, and no Canadian university currently has an American football program (the last university to have one, the Simon Fraser Clan, pulled out of the NAIA in favour of CIS football, but is in a bid to rejoin once again.).

As of 2008, two players from each team are from Canadian universities: The Canadian players on the Western team come from Canada West schools, while the players on the Eastern come from the other three Canadian conferences. The practice of inviting Canadian players began in 1985 when Calgary Dinos offensive lineman Tom Spoletini was invited to play. Two Canadian players (one for each team) were invited starting in 1986, and continued every year since, except in 2008, when four Canadian players (two per team, one each on offense and defense) were invited.

Canadian Invitees to the East-West Shrine Game
Year West Invitees East Invitees
1985 Tom Spoletini (OL, Calgary Dinos) (none)
1986 Kent Warnock (DE, Calgary Dinos) Mike Schad (OT, Queen's Golden Gaels)
1987 Leo Groenewegen (OT, UBC Thunderbirds) Louie Godry (OL, Guelph Gryphons)
1988 Craig Watson (OL, Calgary Dinos) Pierre Vercheval (OL, Western Ontario Mustangs)
1989 Brent Korte (DE, Alberta Golden Bears) Leroy Blugh (LB, Bishop's Gaiters)
1990 Mark Singer (LB, Alberta Golden Bears) Chris Gioskos (OL, Ottawa Gee-Gees)
1991 Mike Pavelec (OL, Calgary Dinos) Paul Vajda (OL, Concordia Stingers)
1992 Jason Rauhaus (DE, Manitoba Bisons) Chris Morris (OL, Toronto Varsity Blues)
1993 Chris Konrad (DE, Calgary Dinos) Mike O'Shea (LB, Guelph Gryphons)
1994 Travis Serke (OT, Saskatchewan Huskies) Val St. Germain (OG, McGill Redmen)
1995 Rohn Meyer (OG, Calgary Dinos) Matthieu Quiviger (OT, McGill Redmen)
1996 Don Blair (WR, Calgary Dinos) Harry Van Hofwegen (DT, Carleton Ravens)
1997 Ben Fairbrother (OL, Calgary Dinos) Mark Farraway (DL, St. Francis Xavier X-Men)
1998 Bob Beveridge (OL, UBC Thunderbirds) Dave Miller-Johnston (P/K, Concordia Stingers)
1999 Scott Flory (OT, Saskatchewan Huskies) Cameron Legault (DT, Carleton Ravens)
2000 Kevin Lefsrud (OT, Saskatchewan Huskies) Kojo Millington (DE, Wilfrid Laurier Golden Hawks)
2001 Carlo Panaro (OL, Alberta Golden Bears) Randy Chevrier (DL, McGill Redmen)
2002 Jason Clermont (IR, Regina Rams) Kojo Aidoo (RB, McMaster Marauders)
2003 Israel Idonije (DT, Manitoba Bisons) Adam MacDonald (LB, St. Francis Xavier X-Men)
2004 Ibrahim Khan (OL, Simon Fraser Clan) Carl Gourgues (OL, Laval Rouge-et-Or)
2005 Nick Johansson (DT, UBC Thunderbirds) Jesse Lumsden (RB, McMaster Marauders)
2006 Daniel Federkeil (DE, Calgary Dinos) Andy Fantuz (WR, Western Ontario Mustangs)
2007 Jordan Rempel (OL, Saskatchewan Huskies) Chris Best (OL, Waterloo Warriors)
2008 Dylan Barker (S, Saskatchewan Huskies)
Brendon LaBatte (OG, Regina Rams)
Samuel Giguère (WR, Sherbrooke Vert-et-Or)
Eric Maranda (LB, Laval Rouge-et-Or)
2009 Simeon Rottier (OT, Alberta Golden Bears) Etienne Légaré (DT, Laval Rouge-et-Or)
2010 Jordan Sisco (WR/SB, Regina Rams) Matt Morencie (C, Windsor Lancers)

See also

References

External links

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