East End, Houston: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The East End is a district in eastern Houston, Texas, United States, located between the eastern edge of downtown to the Port of Houston and south to Hobby Airport.[1] The district is home to Houston's early history and industry and is the site of Harrisburg, the seat of government for the Republic of Texas in 1836. [2] East End consists of many different ethnic groups, including Hispanic, Asian, White, and African American. Latinos make up more than half of the 100,512 residents, The area includes two of Houston’s oldest Hispanic neighborhoods, Magnolia Park and Second Ward.

Contents

History

The East End is bounded on the west by downtown Houston and on the east by the Port of Houston. Buffalo Bayou flows past the site of Harrisburg, an early Texas trading post and seat of government for the Republic of Texas in 1836. Founded by John Harris, for whom Harris County is named, Harrisburg was initially considered by the Allen brothers for the initial development of Houston. [3]

The East End was a primary area for relocation for Germans, Italians and Mexican Americans that settled in areas near the port of Houston. Second Ward and Magnolia Park, located in the district, are two of Houston's oldest Hispanic neighborhoods. The Eastwood subdivision, established in 1913, is considered one of the first master-planned communities in Houston. The district has become popular who restore many of its vintage homes. [4] In the mid-to-late 2000s upper middle class residents moved into the East End to take advantage of houses that are less expensive than west side houses.[5] Many well-known Houstonians including Howard Hughes lived in Eastwood as children. [6]

For several months leading into August 2007 the The East End Chamber of Commerce Crime Awareness Committee argued that the Houston Police Department assigned insufficient police officers in the area.[7]

Culture

The Talento Bilingue de Houston, the largest cultural arts center of its kind in Houston is located in the East End, as well as the 100 seat Carlos Garcia Theater at Houston Community College-Southeast campus which was dedicated in late 1997. [8] The district is home to The Orange Show, Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, Mutalistan Hall, and a Chicano mural by artist Leo Tanguma on Canal Street. [9]

The Association for the Advancement of Mexican Americans opened the new $3.6 million AAMA Multi-Purpose Education Center in 1999. The center includes computer and science labs. [10] The Ripley House-Neighborhood Centers successfully completed a capital campaign to raise $9 million to replace its 60-year old, aging physical structure with a new 60,000-square-foot (5,600 m2) community center. [11]

Government and infrastructure

The Greater East End District is headquartered at 3211 Harrisburg Street.[12]

Economy

KBR offices on Clinton Drive

KBR maintains offices on Clinton Drive,[13][14] within the boundaries of the East End and the Fifth Ward.[15][16] The KBR office complex is the former headquarters of Brown & Root.[17]

By 2001 Halliburton owned the Clinton Drive campus. In August of that year Halliburton announced that it would consolidate 8,000 local employees to office space in Westchase. Halliburton planned to relocate around 2,000 employees from Clinton Drive and the industrial facilities would have been relocated to a location that was, in that month, undetermined. Sanford Criner, a principal at real estate brokerage Trione & Gordon, suggested that gentrification would turn what would have been the former Clinton Drive facility into entertainment, residential, or retail use, and that the facility would not have been redeveloped for office space usage.[18] In December 2001 Halliburton canceled its plans to relocate employees to Westchase. Nancy Sarnoff of the Houston Business Journal said that it made more sense for the company to lease existing space instead of constructing new office space in times of economic downturns.[19]

Education

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Primary and secondary schools

Public schools

Residents attend school in the Houston Independent School District.

Sections of areas within the East End Management District[15] are zoned to the following schools:

Eastwood Academy is an HISD charter school serving the Austin High School attendance boundary.[24]

The cafeteria of the former Anson Jones Elementary School became a reception hall. [25]

State charter schools include:

  • KIPP Intrepid Preparatory School[26]
  • YES East End, a charter school that, as one branch of YES Prep Public Schools, serves grades 6-10 in 2009-2010 and will grow to serve grades 6-12 by 2011-2012. It is located in the Near North Side area, northwest of the East End area.

Colleges and universities

The Houston Community College System serves the East End.

Public libraries

Patricio Flores Neighborhood Library

The Patricio Flores Neighborhood Library of Houston Public Library is in the East End.

References

  1. ^ "The East End Management District: The New Day Begins!". http://www.greatereastend.com/eemd.cfm?m=din&s=abt. Retrieved 2008-03-29.  
  2. ^ "The East End Management District: The New Day Begins!". http://www.greatereastend.com/eemd.cfm?m=din&s=abt. Retrieved 2008-03-29.  
  3. ^ "The East End Management District, History". http://www.greatereastend.com/eemd.cfm?m=eep&s=his. Retrieved 2008-03-29.  
  4. ^ "The East End Management District, History, Neighborhoods". http://www.greatereastend.com/eemd.cfm?m=eep&s=his. Retrieved 2008-03-29.  
  5. ^ Sarnoff, Nancy. "Housing buzz fuels move to East End." Houston Chronicle. January 21, 2008. Retrieved on April 7, 2009.
  6. ^ "Houston Community Newspapers Online - Communities experience revitalization". http://www.hcnonline.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13745477&BRD=1574&PAG=461&dept_id=532207&rfi=8. Retrieved 2008-03-29.  
  7. ^ Britt, Douglas. "Is the East End caught in the middle?." Houston Chronicle. July 4, 2007. Retrieved on August 9, 2009.
  8. ^ "The East End Management District, Culture". http://www.greatereastend.com/eemd.cfm?m=eep&s=his. Retrieved 2008-03-29.  
  9. ^ "The East End Management District, Culture". http://www.greatereastend.com/eemd.cfm?m=eep&s=his. Retrieved 2008-03-29.  
  10. ^ "AAMA Today - The Association for the Advancement of Mexican Americans, About Us, AAMA Today". http://www.aamainc.us/en/cms/?142. Retrieved 2008-03-29.  
  11. ^ "The East End Management District, Culture". http://www.greatereastend.com/eemd.cfm?m=eep&s=his. Retrieved 2008-03-29.  
  12. ^ "Contact the District." Greater East End District. Retrieved on April 7, 2009.
  13. ^ Eriksen, Helen. "Will KBR ditch its Houston headquarters for Katy suburbia?." Houston Chronicle. April 30, 2008. Retrieved on January 13, 2009.
  14. ^ "KBR Announces Pricing of Its Initial Public Offering." KBR. November 15, 2006. Retrieved on July 25, 2009.
  15. ^ a b "Map." East End Management District. Retrieved on July 30, 2009.
  16. ^ Fifth Ward, Houston from the Handbook of Texas Online Retrieved on June 25, 2009.
  17. ^ "Offices." Brown & Root. January 31, 1998. Retrieved on September 15, 2009.
  18. ^ Sarnoff, Nancy. "Halliburton move could create hole in Houston's office market." Houston Business Journal. Friday August 10, 2001. Retrieved on November 11, 2009.
  19. ^ Sarnoff, Nancy. "Downtown up, Westchase down as Halliburton postpones project." Houston Business Journal. Friday December 21, 2009. Retrieved on November 11, 2009.
  20. ^ "Austin High School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  21. ^ "Jones High School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  22. ^ "Milby High School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  23. ^ "Wheatley High School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  24. ^ "HISD campus charters." Houston Chronicle. August 12, 2003. Retrieved on October 17, 2009.
  25. ^ Britt, Douglas. "High-density city centers are area's future, developer says." Houston Chronicle. July 20, 2007. Retrieved on October 17, 2009.
  26. ^ "KIPP heads east." Houston Chronicle.

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