The Full Wiki

Easter Sepulchre: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An Easter Sepulchre is a feature of English church architecture (interior design).

Contents

Description

A straightforward undecorated example from St Marys Church, Grendon, Northants

The Easter Sepulchre is an arched recess generally in the north wall of the chancel, in which from Good Friday to Easter day were deposited the crucifix and sacred elements in commemoration of Christ's entombment and resurrection. It was generally only a wooden erection, which was placed in a recess or on a tomb.

Distribution

The Easter Sepulchre is only found in England, the practice having been peculiar to the Sarum Rite.

Usage

The Easter Sepulchre contained the Blessed Sacrament of the altar, the Host. Believing in a very real way that Jesus is indeed in the Host, the Lord was taken from the tabernacle of the Church on Good Friday evening and placed in a coffin-like box. Candles were lit around the sepulchre, burial clothes adorned it, and parishioners stood guard until early Easter morning at the first Mass. The Host was brought out, as Jesus came out of the tomb, and placed in the tabernacle in the center of the Church.[1]

Surviving examples

There are throughout England many fine examples in stone, some of which belong to the Decorated period, such as:

Advertisements

Devon

  • Holcombe Burnell

Dorset

Herefordshire

Lincolnshire

Norfolk

  • St. Andrew's Church, Northwold

Nottinghamshire

Oxfordshire

Suffolk

Warwickshire

East Riding of Yorkshire

References

  1. ^ Eamon Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England 1400-1580, Yale University Press, 1992.

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

EASTER SEPULCHRE, in church architecture an arched recess, generally in the north wall of the chancel, in which from Good Friday to Easter day were deposited the crucifix and sacred elements in commemoration of Christ's entombment and resurrection. It was generally only a wooden erection, which was placed in a recess or on a tomb. There are throughout England many fine examples in stone, some of which belong to the Decorated period, such as at Navenby and Heckington (1370) in Lincolnshire, Sibthorpe and Hawton (1370) in Nottinghamshire, Patrington in Yorkshire, Bampton in Oxfordshire, Holcombe Burnell in Devonshire, and Long Itchington and other churches in Warwickshire.


<< Canons Regular of the Holy Sepulchre

The Hgly Sepulchre >>


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message