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Numeral systems by culture
Hindu-Arabic numerals
Eastern Arabic
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List of numeral system topics
Positional systems by base
Decimal (10)
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12, 16, 20, 60 more…
Arabic alphabet
ا    ب    ت    ث    ج    ح
خ    د    ذ    ر    ز    س
ش    ص    ض    ط    ظ    ع
غ    ف    ق    ك    ل
م    ن    ه‍    و    ي
History · Transliteration
Diacritics · Hamza ء
Numerals · Numeration

The Eastern Arabic numerals (also called Arabic-Indic numerals and Arabic Eastern Numerals) are the symbols used to represent the Hindu-Arabic numeral system in conjunction with the Arabic alphabet in Egypt, Sudan as well as Asian non-Arabic countries, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and parts of India, as well as with the obsolete Ottoman Turkish alphabet (٠,١,٢,٣,٤,٥,٦,٧,٨,٩).

Contents

Other names

They are sometimes also called "Indic Numerals" in English.[1] However, this nomenclature is sometimes discouraged as it "leads to confusion with the digits currently used with the scripts of India"[2] (see Indian numerals).

Numerals

There is substantial variation in usage of glyphs for the Eastern Arabic-Indic digits, especially for the digits four, five, six, and seven.[3]

Arabic 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Indian numerals ٠ ١ ٢ ٣ ٤ ٥ ٦ ٧ ٨ ٩
Persian variant ۰ ۱ ۲ ۳ ۴ ۵ ۶ ۷ ۸ ۹

North Africa

In most of present-day North Africa, the usual Arabic numerals (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9) are used; in medieval times, a slightly different set (from which, via Italy, Western "Arabic numerals" derive) was used. The numerals are arranged with their lowest value digit to the right, with higher value positions added to the left. This arrangement was adopted identically into the numerals as used in Europe. The Latin alphabet runs from left to right, unlike the Arabic alphabet. Traditionally in Arabic and in European languages, numbers were once read with the smallest element first ("four-and-twenty"). Presently, this continues to be the case in Arabic and some European languages ("vierentwintig" in Dutch or "vierundzwanzig" in German), while in some other European languages the element on the left now goes first ("twenty-four" in English or "vingt-quatre" in French). There is no conflict unless numerical layout is necessary, as is the case for arithmetic problems (as in simple addition or multiplication) and lists of numbers, which tend still to be justified to the right, even in European languages.

See also

References

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Noun

Eastern Arabic numerals

  1. Plural form of Eastern Arabic numeral.

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