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Ed Pastor


Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 4th district
Incumbent
Assumed office 
September 24, 1991
Preceded by Mo Udall

In office
1977 – 1991

Born June 28, 1943 (1943-06-28) (age 66)
Claypool, Arizona
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Verma Pastor (Mendez)
Residence Phoenix, Arizona
Alma mater Arizona State University
Occupation Member of Congress, Former: high school teacher
Religion Roman Catholic

Edward Lopez "Ed" Pastor (born June 28, 1943) is an American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1991, representing Arizona's 4th congressional district. The district includes most of southern, western, and downtown Phoenix, along with a portion of Glendale.

Contents

Early life

Pastor was born in Claypool, Arizona as the oldest of three children. After high school, he was educated at Arizona State University. He became a chemistry teacher at North High School in Phoenix and later went on to work as deputy director of the community service group Guadalupe Organization Inc. After returning to ASU to earn a law degree, he became an assistant to Arizona Governor Raul Castro. In 1976, Pastor was elected to the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors, and he served three terms in that role as a county executive.

Electoral history

In 1991, Pastor won a special election to succeed 28-year incumbent Democrat Mo Udall in the 2nd District. He was the first Latino to represent Arizona in Congress. At the time, the 2nd was the only Democratic bastion in Arizona. He easily won a full term in 1992. He was reelected four times without substantive Republican opposition, never dropping below 60% of the vote.

After the 2000 United States Census, Arizona gained two congressional districts. Pastor's former territory was renumbered as the 7th District, but his home was drawn into the newly created 4th District. Rather than move to the Phoenix portion of the reconfigured 7th, Pastor opted to run in the 4th. The newly created district is heavily Democratic, like Pastor's old district; Democrats have a nearly 2-to-1 advantage in registration.[1] He easily won in November. He has been reelected twice from this district, easily defeating Phoenix resident Don Karg in the last two cycles.[2]

He currently serves on the House Appropriations Committee as well as two subcommittees on Energy and Water Management, and Transportation, Treasury, and Housing in the District of Columbia. He is also one of the nine Chief Deputy Whips for the Democratic Caucus.[3]

Pastor is one of the most liberal members of the House, and was a founding member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. Pastor is pro-choice and in 2006 supported the interests of the Planned Parenthood 100 percent, according to their records. In 2006, NARAL Pro-Choice America-Endorsements endorsed Representative Pastor.[4] He does not support the Iraq War.

Committee assignments

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Congressional caucuses

Board memberships

  • Board of Directors of Neighborhood Housing Services of America
  • Honorary Director to Timber Trails Children's Project, Inc

Electoral history

Arizona's 2nd congressional district: Results 1992–2000[5]
Year Democrat Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct
1990 Mo Udall * 76,549 66% Joseph Sweeney 39,586 34% *
1992 Ed Pastor 90,693 66% Don Shooter 41,257 30% Dan Detaranto Libertarian 5,423 4% *
1994 Ed Pastor 62,589 62% Robert MacDonald 32,797 33% James Bertrand Libertarian 5,060 5%
1996 Ed Pastor 81,982 65% Jim Buster 38,786 31% Alice Bangle Libertarian 5,333 4%
1998 Ed Pastor 57,178 68% Ed Barron 23,628 28% Rick Duncan Libertarian 2,646 3% Gregory R. Schultz Reform 911 1%
2000 Ed Pastor 84,034 69% Bill Barenholtz 32,990 27% Geoffrey Weber Libertarian 3,169 3% Barbara Shelor Natural Law 2,412 2%
*Write-in and minor candidate notes: In 1990, write-ins received 44 votes. In 1992, write-ins received 5 votes.

** Udall resigned from Congress due to his diagnonis of Parkinson's disease in 1991; Pastor won the special election to serve out the remainder of Udall's term.

Arizona's 4th congressional district: Results 2002–2008[5]
Year Democrat Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct
2002 Ed Pastor 44,517 67% Jonathan Barnert 18,381 28% Amy Gibbons Libertarian 3,167 5%
2004 Ed Pastor 77,150 70% Don Karg 28,238 26% Gary Fallon Libertarian 4,639 4%
2006 Ed Pastor 56,464 73% Don Karg 18,627 24% Ronald Harders Libertarian 2,770 4%
2008 Ed Pastor 89,721 72% Don Karg 26,435 21% Joe Cobb Libertarian 3,807 3% Rebecca DeWitt Green 4,644 4%

References

  1. ^ azsos.gov
  2. ^ azsos.gov
  3. ^ majoritywhip.house.gov
  4. ^ vote-smart.org
  5. ^ a b "Election Statistics". Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/index.html. Retrieved 2008-01-10.  

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Morris Udall
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 2nd congressional district

1991-09-24 – 2003-01-03
Succeeded by
Trent Franks
Preceded by
John Shadegg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 4th congressional district

2003-01-03 – present
Incumbent
Representatives to the 102nd–111th United States Congresses from Arizona
102nd Senate: D. DeConcini | J. McCain House: B. Stump | J. Kolbe | J. Kyl | J. J. Rhodes III | E. Pastor
103rd Senate: D. DeConcini | J. McCain House: B. Stump | J. Kolbe | J. Kyl | E. Pastor | S. Coppersmith | K. English
104th Senate: J. McCain | J. Kyl House: B. Stump | J. Kolbe | E. Pastor | J. D. Hayworth | M. Salmon | J. Shadegg
105th Senate: J. McCain | J. Kyl House: B. Stump | J. Kolbe | E. Pastor | J. D. Hayworth | M. Salmon | J. Shadegg
106th Senate: J. McCain | J. Kyl House: B. Stump | J. Kolbe | E. Pastor | J. D. Hayworth | M. Salmon | J. Shadegg
107th Senate: J. McCain | J. Kyl House: B. Stump | J. Kolbe | E. Pastor | J. D. Hayworth | J. Shadegg | J. Flake
108th Senate: J. McCain | J. Kyl House: J. Kolbe | E. Pastor | J. D. Hayworth | J. Shadegg | J. Flake | T. Franks | R. Grijalva | R. Renzi
109th Senate: J. McCain | J. Kyl House: J. Kolbe | E. Pastor | J. D. Hayworth | J. Shadegg | J. Flake | T. Franks | R. Grijalva | R. Renzi
110th Senate: J. McCain | J. Kyl House: E. Pastor | J. Shadegg | J. Flake | T. Franks | R. Grijalva | R. Renzi | G. Giffords | H. Mitchell
111th Senate: J. McCain | J. Kyl House: E. Pastor | J. Shadegg | J. Flake | T. Franks | R. Grijalva | G. Giffords | H. Mitchell | A. Kirkpatrick

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