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Edith Maud Abney-Hastings, 12th Countess of Loudoun (13 May 1883 – 24 February 1960) was a British peeress.

Family

She was the first daughter and coheiress of Hon. Paulyn Abney-Hastings (the second son of Charles Abney-Hastings, 1st Baron Donington and Edith Rawdon-Hastings, 10th Countess of Loudoun) and his wife, Lady Maud née Grimston (the third daughter of James Grimston, 2nd Earl of Verulam).

On 12 December 1916, she married Captain Reginald Huddleston, who adopted his wife's surname. They divorced in 1947 after having six children:

  • Ian Huddleston Abney-Hastings, styled Lord Mauchline (1918-1944), killed in Italy in World War II[1]
  • Lady Barbara Huddleston Abney-Hastings (1919-2002), later 13th Countess of Loudoun
  • Lady Jean Huddleston Abney-Hastings (later Campbell of Loudoun, 1920-1981), married (1) Edgar Wakefield, (2) Arthur Hubble
  • Lady Iona Mary Huddleston Abney-Hastings (1922-1990), married Robert French
  • Lady Fiona Huddleston Abney-Hastings (1923-1993), married Robert Conroy-Robertson (later de Fresnes), 12th baron de Fresnes
  • Lady Edith Huddleston Abney-Hastings (1925-2006), married David Maclaren (they had two children, Norman Angus MacLaren and Roderick John MacLaren).

Peerages

On 17 May 1920, she inherited the earldom of Loudoun from her childless uncle, Charles Rawdon-Hastings, 11th Earl of Loudoun.

On 19 October that year, she and her sister, Viscountess St Davids, petitioned the Committee for Privileges for the baronies of Botreaux, Hungerford, de Moleyns, Hastings (de Hastings) and Hastings (de Hungerford), which were abeyant between them and their other sister, Lady Flora, since the death of the 11th Earl.[2] They also petitioned for the baronies of Strange (de Knockyn) and Stanley as descendants of the last holder, Ferdinando Stanley, 5th Earl of Derby.[3] The sisters were confirmed as co-heirs to the baronies on 17 December.[4][5] On 23 February 1921, the viscountess was granted the baronies of Hungerford, de Moleyns and Strange (de Knockyn), whilst those of Botreaux, Stanley and Hastings (de Hastings) were granted to the countess on 7 March.[6][7]

On 23 June that year, the two sisters also petitioned for the earldoms of Warwick and Salisbury, and for the baronies of Montagu, Montacute, Monthermer and Pole of Montagu, as descendants of Edward Plantagenet, 17th Earl of Warwick and Margaret Pole, 8th Countess of Salisbury, and for the latters attainders to be reversed.[8][9] However, James Gascoyne-Cecil, 4th Marquess of Salisbury and Francis Greville, 5th Earl of Warwick counter-petitioned and the attainders were not reversed.[10][11][12][13]

On Lady Loudoun's death in 1960, her earldom passed to her eldest surviving child, Lady Barbara, whilst her English baronies became abeyant again, between her five daughters.

References

Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
Charles Rawdon-Hastings
Countess of Loudoun
1920–1960
Succeeded by
Barbara Abney-Hastings
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Abeyant
(previously Charles Rawdon-Hastings)
Baroness Botreaux
(abeyance terminated)

1921–1960
Succeeded by
Abeyant
Baroness Hastings (de Hastings)
(abeyance terminated)

1921–1960
Baroness Hastings (de Hungerford)
(abeyance terminated)

1921–1960
Preceded by
Abeyant
(previously Ferdinando Stanley)
Baroness Stanley
(abeyance terminated)

1921–1960
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