The Full Wiki

Eighth United States Congress: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to 8th United States Congress article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

8th United States Congress
USCapitol1800.jpg
United States Capitol (1800)

Duration: March 4, 1803 – March 3, 1805

President of the Senate: Aaron Burr
President pro tempore: John Brown
Jesse Franklin
Joseph Anderson
Speaker of the House: Nathaniel Macon
Members: 34 Senators
142 Representatives
1 Non-voting members
Senate Majority: Democratic-Republican
House Majority: Democratic-Republican

Sessions
1st: October 17, 1803 – March 27, 1804
2nd: November 5, 1804 – March 3, 1805
<7th 9th>
United States Capitol with "Brick Oven"

The Eighth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1803 to March 3, 1805, during the last two years of the first administration of U.S. President Thomas Jefferson. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Second Census of the United States in 1800. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority.

Major events

Major legislation

Constitutional amendments

Treaties

  • October 20, 1803: Senate ratified the Louisiana Purchase Treaty

States admitted and territories organized

Party summary

The count below identifies party affiliations at the beginning of the first session of this Congress, and includes members from vacancies and newly admitted states, when they were first seated. Changes resulting from subsequent replacements are shown below in the "Changes in membership" section.

Advertisements

Senate

TOTAL members: 34

House of Representatives

TOTAL members: 142

Leadership

President of the Senate
Vice President
Aaron Burr

Senate

House of Representatives

Members

This list is arranged by chamber, then by state. Senators are listed in order of seniority, and Representatives are listed by district.

Senate

Senators were elected by the state legislatures every two years, with one-third beginning new six year terms with each Congress. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election. In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term began with this Congress, requiring reelection in 1808; Class 2 meant their term ended in this Congress, requiring reelection in 1804; and Class 3 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 1806.

Connecticut

Delaware

Georgia

Kentucky

Maryland

Massachusetts

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

Tennessee

Vermont

Virginia

House of Representatives

The names of members of the House of Representatives elected statewide on the general ticket or otherwise at-large, are preceded by an "A/L," and the names of those elected from districts, whether plural or single member, are preceded by their district numbers.

Connecticut

All representatives were elected statewide on a general ticket.

Delaware

Georgia

All representatives were elected statewide on a general ticket.

Kentucky

Maryland

The 5th district was a plural district with two representatives.

Massachusetts

New Hampshire

All representatives were elected statewide on a general ticket.

New Jersey

All representatives were elected statewide on a general ticket.

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Pennsylvania

There were four plural districts, the 1st, 2nd, & 3rd had three representatives each, the 4th had two representatives.

Rhode Island

Both representatives were elected statewide on a general ticket.

South Carolina

Tennessee

All representatives were elected statewide on a general ticket.

Vermont

Virginia

Non-voting members

Changes in membership

The count below reflects changes from the beginning of the first session of this Congress.

Senate

  • replacements: 7
  • deaths: 2
  • resignations: 7
  • seats of newly admitted states: 2
  • Total seats with changes: 12
State Vacator Reason for Vacancy Successor Date of Successor's Installation
Ohio
class 1
Vacant Failure to elect John Smith (DR) Seated April 1, 1803
Ohio
class 3
Vacant Failure to elect Thomas Worthington (DR) Seated April 1, 1803
New Jersey
class 1
Vacant Failure to elect John Condit (DR) Seated September 1, 1803
Virginia
class 1
Stevens T. Mason (DR) Died May 10, 1803 John Taylor (DR) Appointed June 4, 1803
New York
class 3
DeWitt Clinton (DR) Resigned November 4, 1803 to become Mayor of New York City John Armstrong, Jr. (DR) Appointed December 7, 1803
Virginia
class 1
John Taylor (DR) Successor elected December 7, 1803 Abraham B. Venable (DR) Elected December 7, 1803
New York
class 1
Theodorus Bailey (DR) Resigned January 16, 1804 to become Postmaster of New York City John Armstrong, Jr. (DR) Seated February 25, 1804
New York
class 3
John Armstrong, Jr. (DR) Successor elected February 23, 1804 John Smith (DR) Elected February 23, 1804
Virginia
class 2
Wilson C. Nicholas (DR) Resigned May 22, 1804 to become Collector of Port of Norfolk Andrew Moore (DR) Appointed August 11, 1804
Virginia
class 1
Abraham B. Venable (DR) Resigned June 7, 1804 William B. Giles (DR) Appointed August 11, 1804
New York
class 1
John Armstrong, Jr. (DR) Resigned June 30, 1804 after being appointed Minister to France Samuel Latham Mitchill (DR) Seated November 23, 1804
Rhode Island
class 1
Samuel J. Potter (DR) Died October 14, 1804 Benjamin Howland (DR) Seated October 29, 1804
Delaware
class 2
William H. Wells (F) Resigned November 6, 1804 James A. Bayard (F) Seated November 13, 1804
South Carolina
class 3
Pierce Butler (DR) Resigned November 21, 1804 John Gaillard (DR) Seated December 6, 1804
Virginia
class 1
William B. Giles (DR) Successor elected December 4, 1804 Andrew Moore (DR) Elected December 4, 1804
Virginia
class 2
Andrew Moore (DR) Successor elected December 4, 1804 William B. Giles (DR) Elected December 4, 1804

House of Representatives

  • replacements: 7
  • deaths: 5
  • resignations: 5
  • contested elections: 1
  • seats of newly admitted states: 1
  • Total seats with changes: 12
District Vacator Reason for Vacancy Successor Date of Successor's Installation
New York
6th
Isaac Bloom (DR) Died April 26, 1803 Daniel C. Verplanck (DR) October 17, 1803
New York
1st
John Smith (DR) Resigned February 23, 1804 after being elected to US Senate Samuel Riker (DR) November 5, 1804
Virginia
5th
Thomas Lewis, Jr. (F) Lost contested election March 5, 1804 Andrew Moore (DR) March 5, 1804
Maryland
4th
Daniel Hiester (DR) Died March 7, 1804 Roger Nelson (DR) November 6, 1804
Virginia
13th
John J. Trigg (DR) Died May 17, 1804 Christopher H. Clark (DR) November 5, 1804
Massachusetts
12th
Thomson J. Skinner (DR) Resigned August 10, 1804 Simon Larned (DR) November 5, 1804
Virginia
5th
Andrew Moore (DR) Resigned August 11, 1804 after being appointed to US Senate Alexander Wilson (DR) December 4, 1804
Pennsylvania
10th
William Hoge (DR) Resigned October 15, 1804 John Hoge (DR) November 2, 1804
New York
3rd
Samuel L. Mitchill (DR) Resigned November 22, 1804 after being elected to US Senate George Clinton (DR) February 14, 1805
Georgia
At-large
Samuel Hammond (DR) Resigned February 2, 1805 after becoming Civil and Military Governor of the Upper Louisiana Territory Vacant Not filled for remainder of term

Officers

Senate

House of Representatives

References

  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.  
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.  

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message