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Eleventh Battle of the Isonzo
Part of Italian Front (World War I)
Italian Front 1915-1917.jpg
Date August 18 to September 12, 1917
Location Isonzo River, near Monfalcone, Italy; Banjšice Plateau, Slovenia
Result Inconclusive
Belligerents
Italy Italy  Austria-Hungary
Commanders
Luigi Cadorna,
Luigi Capello
Svetozar Boroević
Strength
600 battalions,
5,200 guns
250 battalions,
2,200 guns
Casualties and losses
120,000(20,000 dead, 50,000 wounded, 30,000 missing, 20,000 taken prisoner) 160,000(30,000 dead,110,000 wounded, 20,000 missing and taken prisoner)

The Eleventh Battle of the Isonzo was a World War I battle fought by the Italian and Austro-Hungarian Armies on the Italian Front between August 18 and September 12, 1917.

Contents

Background

On the Isonzo River, Luigi Cadorna, the Italian Chief of Staff, concentrated three quarters of his troops: 600 battalions (52 divisions) with 5,200 guns.

Battle

The attack was carried forth from a front from Tolmin (in the upper Isonzo valley) to the Adriatic Sea. The Italians crossed the river in several points on temporary bridges, but the main effort was exerted on the Bainsizza Plateau, whose capture was to further the offensive and break the Austro-Hungarian lines in two segments, isolating the strongholds of Mount Saint Gabriel and Mount Hermada.

After fierce and deadly fightings, the Italian Second Army, led by General Capello, pushed back Boroević's Isonzo Armee, conquering the Bainsizza and Mount Santo. Other positions were taken by the Duke of Aosta's Third Army.

However, Mount Saint Gabriel and Mount Hermada turned out to be impregnable, and the offensive wore out.

After the battle, the Austro-Hungarians were exhausted, and could not have withstood another attack. Fortunately for them (and unfortunately for their opponents), so were the Italians, who could not find the resources necessary for another assault, even though it might have been the decisive one. So the final result of the battle was an inconclusive bloodbath. Moreover, the end of the battle left the Italian Second Army (until then the most successful of the Italian Armies) split in two parts across the Isonzo River, a weak point that proved to be decisive in the subsequent Twelfth Battle of the Isonzo.

See also

External links

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Eleventh Battle of the Isonzo
Part of Italian Front (World War I)
Date August 18 to September 12, 1917
Location Isonzo River, near Monfalcone, Italy; Banjšice Plateau, Slovenia
Result Inconclusive
Belligerents
File:Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Italy  Austria-Hungary
Commanders and leaders
Luigi Cadorna,
Luigi Capello
Svetozar Boroević
Strength
600 battalions,
5,200 guns
250 battalions,
2,200 guns
Casualties and losses
148,000 (40,000 dead, 108,000 wounded) 105,000 (10,000 dead,45,000 wounded, 30,000 missing 20,000 taken prisoner)

The Eleventh Battle of the Isonzo was a World War I battle fought by the Italian and Austro-Hungarian Armies on the Italian Front between August 18 and September 12, 1917.

Contents

Background

On the Isonzo River, Luigi Cadorna, the Italian Chief of Staff, concentrated three quarters of his troops: 600 battalions (52 divisions) with 5,200 guns.

Battle

The attack was carried forth from a front from Tolmin (in the upper Isonzo valley) to the Adriatic Sea. The Italians crossed the river in several points on temporary bridges, but the main effort was exerted on the Bainsizza Plateau, whose capture was to further the offensive and break the Austro-Hungarian lines in two segments, isolating the strongholds of Mount Saint Gabriel and Mount Hermada.

After fierce and deadly fightings, the Italian Second Army, led by General Capello, pushed back Boroević's Isonzo Armee, conquering the Bainsizza and Mount Santo. Other positions were taken by the Duke of Aosta's Third Army.

However, Mount Saint Gabriel and Mount Hermada turned out to be impregnable, and the offensive wore out.

After the battle, the Austro-Hungarians were exhausted, and could not have withstood another attack. Fortunately for them (and unfortunately for their opponents), so were the Italians, who could not find the resources necessary for another assault, even though it might have been the decisive one. So the final result of the battle was an inconclusive bloodbath. Moreover, the end of the battle left the Italian Second Army (until then the most successful of the Italian Armies) split in two parts across the Isonzo River, a weak point that proved to be decisive in the subsequent Twelfth Battle of the Isonzo.

See also

External links


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