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Elizabeth Carver, born Elizabeth Hobart ( - 19 October 1937) was the wife of Bernard Montgomery, who later became Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein.

Contents

Early life and marriage

Hobart was the daughter of Robert Thompson Hobart of Tunbridge Wells. She married Oswald Carver in 1911.[1] Carver had rowed in the 1908 Boat Race for Cambridge and won bronze medal rowing at the 1908 Summer Olympics. The family lived at The Hollies in Marple where Carver was in business in the cotton trade. Carver died of wounds at Gallipoli in June 1915.[2] Elizabeth Carver married Major (brevet lieutenant-colonel) Montgomery in 1927.

Death

In 1937, she was bitten by an insect while on holiday in Burnham-on-Sea. The bite became infected and she died on 19 October from septicaemia following an amputation. The loss devastated the then Brigadier Montgomery, but he insisted on throwing himself back into his work immediately after the funeral.

Family

Elizabeth had two sons by her first marriage. John Hobart Carver was the father of Martin Carver, professor of archaeology at the University of York. Richard Oswald Hobart Carver made an epic escape as a prisoner of war during the second world war.[3]

Her son by her second marriage, David Montgomery, 2nd Viscount Montgomery of Alamein was born on 18 August 1928. He first married Mary Raymond Connell, daughter of Sir Charles Connell, on 27 February 1953. They divorced in 1967. David Bernard Montgomery and Mary Raymond Connell had a son, Hon. Henry David Montgomery, born on 2 April 1954. David Montgomery then married, Tessa Browning, daughter of Lt.-Gen. Sir Frederick Arthur Montague Browning and Daphne du Maurier, in 1970. He succeeded to the title of 2nd Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, of Hindhead, co. Surrey [U.K., 1946] on 24 March 1976.

References

  • Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 775.

External links

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