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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Emmaus (Greek: Ἐμμαούς, Latin: Emmaus, Hebrew: חמתHammat, meaning "warm spring", Arabic: عِمواسImwas) was an ancient town located approximately 7 miles (11 km) northwest of present day Jerusalem. According to Christian scripture, Jesus appeared before two of his followers in Emmaus after his resurrection.[1]

Contents

Emmaus in the New Testament

According to Luke 24:13-27, the risen Jesus appeared to two disciples who were walking from Jerusalem to Emmaus, which is described as being 60 stadia from Jerusalem (10.4 to 12 km depending on what definition of stadia is in use). One of the disciples is named as Cleopas in verse 18, while his companion remains unnamed.

Luke places the story on the evening of the day of Jesus' resurrection. The two disciples have heard the tomb of Jesus was found empty earlier that day. They are discussing the events of the past few days when a stranger asks them what they are discussing. "Their eyes were kept from recognizing him." He soon rebukes them for their unbelief and gives them a Bible study on prophecies about the Messiah. On reaching Emmaus, they ask the stranger to join them for the evening meal. When he breaks the bread "their eyes were opened" and they recognize him as the resurrected Jesus. Jesus immediately vanishes. Cleopas and his friend then hasten back to Jerusalem to carry the news to the other disciples, and arrive in time to proclaim to the eleven who were gathered together with others that Jesus truly is alive. While describing the events, Jesus appeared again to all who were there, giving them a commission to evangelize. Then he took them out as far as Bethany and blessed them before ascending back into heaven.

A similar event is mentioned in the longer ending of Mark, but this is believed to be a late addition derived from the gospel of Luke[2] and the incident is not mentioned in the gospels of Matthew and John.

References in other sources

According to 1 Maccabees 3:55-4:22, around 166 BC Judas Maccabeaus fought against the Seleucids in the region of Emmaus, and was victorious at the Battle of Emmaus; later, the town was fortified by Bacchides, a Seleucid general (1 Macc 9:50). When Rome took over the land it became a toparchy, and was burnt by order of Varus after the death of Herod in 4 BC. During the First Jewish Revolt, before the siege of Jerusalem, Vespasian’s 5th legion was deployed there while the 10th legion was in Jericho. The town was renamed Nicopolis in 221 AD by Emperor Elagabalus, who conferred the title of “city” following the request of a delegation from Emmaus. The Plague of Emmaus in 639 AD is claimed to have caused up to 25,000 deaths in the town.

Historical identification

Many sites have been suggested for the biblical Emmaus, among them Emmaus Nicopolis (ca. 160 stadia from Jerusalem), Kiryat Anavim (66 stadia from Jerusalem on the carriage road to Jaffa), Coloniya (36 stadia on the carriage road to Jaffa), el-Kubeibeh (63 stadia, on the Roman road to Lydda), Artas (60 stadia from Jerusalem) and Khurbet al-Khamasa (86 stadia on the Roman road to Eleutheropolis}. The oldest identification that is currently known is Emmaus Nicopolis.

Emmaus-Nicopolis/Imwas

The first modern site identification of Emmaus was by the explorer Edward Robinson, who equated it with the Palestinian Arab village of Imwas. Before its destruction in 1967, the village of Imwas was located at the end of the Ayalon Valley, on the border of the hill country of Judah, at 153 stadia (18.6 miles) from Jerusalem via the Kiryat Yearim Ridge Route, 161 stadia (19.6 miles) via the Beth-Horon Ridge Route and 1,600 feet (490 m) lower by elevation.

Eusebius was probably the first to mention Nicopolis as biblical Emmaus in his Onomasticon. Jerome, who translated Eusebius’ book, implied in his letter 108 that there was a church in Nicopolis built in the house of Cleopas where Jesus broke bread on that late journey. From the 4th century on, the site was commonly identified as the biblical Emmaus.

Archaeologically, many remains have been excavated at the site of the former Palestinian village, now located inside Canada Park, which support historical and traditional claims. Five structures were found and dated, including a Christian basilica from the 3rd century, another basilica from the 6th century and a 12th century Crusader church.[3] Emmaus Nicopolis is a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church.[4]

Al-Qubeibeh/Castellum Emmaus/Chubebe/Qubaibat

Another possibility is the village of al-Qubeibeh, west of Nebi Samwil on the Beit Horon road northwest of Jerusalem. The town, meaning “little domes” in Arabic, is located at about 65 stadia from Jerusalem. A Roman fort subsequently named Castellum Emmaus (from the Latin root castra, meaning encampment) was discovered at the site in 1099 by the Crusaders. In the 12th century, the Crusaders of the Kingdom of Jerusalem called the site "Small Mahomeria," in order to distinguish it from “Large Mahomeria” near Ramallah. Sounding similar to “Mahommed,” the term was used in medieval times to describe a place inhabited or used for prayer by Muslims. It was referred to as Qubaibat for the first time at the end of that same century by the writer Abu Shama, who writes in his Book of Two Gardens about a Muslim prince falling into the hands of the Crusaders at this spot. The Franciscans built a church here in 1902, on the ruins of a Crusader basilica. Excavations in 1943 revealed artifacts from the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.

Abu-Ghosh/Kiryat Anavim

Abu Ghosh is located in the middle of the Kiryat Yearim Ridge Route between Nicopolis and Jerusalem, nine miles (83 stadia) from the capital. A convent of Minorites with a Gothic church in Abu Ghosh was turned into a stable. Robinson dated it to the Crusader period and declared it "more perfectly preserved than any other ancient church in Palestine." Excavations carried out in 1944 corresponded with Crusader identification of the site as Emmaus.

Emmaus/Colonia/Motza/Ammassa/Ammaous/Beit Mizzeh

Colonia, between Abu Ghosh and Jerusalem on the Kiryat Yearim Ridge Route is another possibility. At a distance of 35 stadia (four miles) from Jerusalem, it was referred to as Motza in the Old Testament, the Talmud and the writings of Josephus Flavius. One mile to the north is a ruin called Beit Mizzeh, identified as the biblical Motza. Listed among the Benjamite cities of Joshua 18:26, it was referred to in the Talmud as a place where people would come to cut young willow-branches as a part of the celebration of Sukkot(Mishnah, Sukkah 4.5: 178). According to Josephus [5] , Amassa (ancient Latin manuscripts) or Ammaous (medieval Greek manuscripts) was about 3.5 Roman miles (30 stadia) or 7 miles (60 stadia) from Jerusalem. A group of 800 soldiers settled here after the First Jewish Revolt. It is believed that the Latin Amassa and the Greek Ammaous are derived from the Hebrew name Motza. Motza was identified as the biblical Emmaus by Birch, and later Savi.

Symbolic identification

One of the oldest extant versions of the Gospel of Luke, preserved in the Codex Bezae, reads "Oulammaus" instead of Emmaus. In Septuagint, the Greek translation of the Old Testament scriptures, Oulammaus was the place where Jacob was visited by God in his dream, while sleeping on a rock.[6] However, Oulammaus was not a real place name at all, but created only by an unfortunate translation mistake. The original name in Hebrew was "Luz". This mistake has long been corrected, but it was still there at the time when the Gospel was written around 100 AD. Thus, a theory has been put forward,[7] that the story in the Gospel was merely symbolic, wanting to draw a parallel between Jacob being visited by God and the disciples being visited by Jesus. To be noted also is that Jacob was sleeping on a rock and Jesus' main disciple Simon Peter was called by the name of rock (Petros).

References

  1. ^ Holy Bible: St. Luke 24: 13-35; Encyclopedia Judaica, Keter Publishing House, Jerusalem, 1972, "Emmaus," Vol. 6, pp. 726-727
  2. ^ Hooker, M. D. (1991). The Gospel according to Mark. London: A & C Black.
  3. ^ Emmaus Nicopolis, official site [1]
  4. ^ Emmaus - Catholic Encyclopedia article
  5. ^ Jewish War 7.10.9
  6. ^ See Genesis 28:10-19.
  7. ^ Jenny Read-Heimerdinger: ‘Where is Emmaus?’, in Studies in the Early Text of the Gospels and Acts, D.J. Taylor (ed.), Birmingham University Press, pp. 229-44. Jenny Read-Heimerdinger with J. Rius-Camps: ‘Emmaous or Oulammaous? Luke’s Use of the Jewish Scriptures in the Text of Luke 24 in Codex Bezae’, Revista Catalana de Teologia 27, pp. 23-42.
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by Caravaggio, 1601]] Emmaus (Greek: Ἐμμαούς, Latin: Emmaus, Hebrew: חמתHammat, meaning "warm spring", Arabic: عِمواس Imwas) was an ancient town located approximately 7 miles (11 km) northwest of present day Jerusalem. According to some Christian scriptures, Jesus appeared before two of his followers in Emmaus after his resurrection.[1]

Contents

Emmaus in the New Testament

The author of the Gospel of Luke, at Luke 24:13-27, writes that Jesus appeared to two disciples who were walking from Jerusalem to Emmaus, which is described as being 60 stadia from Jerusalem (10.4 to 12 km depending on what definition of stadia is in use), after his resurrection. One of the disciples is named as Cleopas in verse 18, while his companion remains unnamed.

The author of Luke places the story on the evening of the day of Jesus' resurrection. The two disciples have heard the tomb of Jesus was found empty earlier that day. They are discussing the events of the past few days when a stranger asks them what they are discussing. "Their eyes were kept from recognizing him." He soon rebukes them for their unbelief and gives them a Bible study on prophecies about the Messiah. On reaching Emmaus, they ask the stranger to join them for the evening meal. When he breaks the bread "their eyes were opened" and they recognize him as the resurrected Jesus. Jesus immediately vanishes. Cleopas and his friend then hasten back to Jerusalem to carry the news to the other disciples, and arrive in time to proclaim to the eleven who were gathered together with others that Jesus truly is alive. While describing the events, Jesus appeared again to all who were there, giving them a commission to evangelize. Then he took them out as far as Bethany and blessed them before ascending back into heaven.

A similar event is mentioned in the longer ending of Mark, but this is believed to be a late addition derived from the gospel of Luke[2] and the incident is not mentioned in the gospels of Matthew and John.

References in other sources

According to 1 Maccabees 3:55-4:22, around 166 BC Judas Maccabeaus fought against the Seleucids in the region of Emmaus, and was victorious at the Battle of Emmaus; later, the town was fortified by Bacchides, a Seleucid general (1 Macc 9:50). When Rome took over the land it became a toparchy, and was burnt by order of Varus after the death of Herod in 4 BC. During the First Jewish Revolt, before the siege of Jerusalem, Vespasian’s 5th legion was deployed there while the 10th legion was in Jericho. The town was renamed Nicopolis in 221 AD by Emperor Elagabalus, who conferred the title of “city” following the request of a delegation from Emmaus. The Plague of Emmaus in 639 AD is claimed to have caused up to 25,000 deaths in the town.

Historical identification

Many sites have been suggested for the biblical Emmaus, among them Emmaus Nicopolis (ca. 160 stadia from Jerusalem), Kiryat Anavim (66 stadia from Jerusalem on the carriage road to Jaffa), Coloniya (36 stadia on the carriage road to Jaffa), el-Kubeibeh (63 stadia, on the Roman road to Lydda), Artas (60 stadia from Jerusalem) and Khurbet al-Khamasa (86 stadia on the Roman road to Eleutheropolis). The oldest identification that is currently known is Emmaus Nicopolis.

Emmaus-Nicopolis/Imwas

The first modern site identification of Emmaus was by the explorer Edward Robinson, who equated it with the Palestinian Arab village of Imwas. Before its destruction in 1967, the village of Imwas was located at the end of the Ayalon Valley, on the border of the hill country of Judah, at 153 stadia (18.6 miles) from Jerusalem via the Kiryat Yearim Ridge Route, 161 stadia (19.6 miles) via the Beth-Horon Ridge Route and 1,600 feet (490 m) lower by elevation.

Eusebius was probably the first to mention Nicopolis as biblical Emmaus in his Onomasticon. Jerome, who translated Eusebius’ book, implied in his letter 108 that there was a church in Nicopolis built in the house of Cleopas where Jesus broke bread on that late journey. From the 4th century on, the site was commonly identified as the biblical Emmaus.

Archaeologically, many remains have been excavated at the site of the former Palestinian village, now located inside Canada Park, which support historical and traditional claims. Five structures were found and dated, including a Christian basilica from the 3rd century, another basilica from the 6th century and a 12th century Crusader church.[3] Emmaus Nicopolis is a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church.[4]

Al-Qubeibeh/Castellum Emmaus/Chubebe/Qubaibat

Another possibility is the village of al-Qubeibeh, west of Nebi Samwil on the Beit Horon road northwest of Jerusalem. The town, meaning “little domes” in Arabic, is located at about 65 stadia from Jerusalem. A Roman fort subsequently named Castellum Emmaus (from the Latin root castra, meaning encampment) was discovered at the site in 1099 by the Crusaders. In the 12th century, the Crusaders of the Kingdom of Jerusalem called the site "Small Mahomeria," in order to distinguish it from “Large Mahomeria” near Ramallah. Sounding similar to “Mahommed,” the term was used in medieval times to describe a place inhabited or used for prayer by Muslims. It was referred to as Qubaibat for the first time at the end of that same century by the writer Abu Shama, who writes in his Book of Two Gardens about a Muslim prince falling into the hands of the Crusaders at this spot. The Franciscans built a church here in 1902, on the ruins of a Crusader basilica. Excavations in 1943 revealed artifacts from the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.

Abu-Ghosh/Kiryat Anavim

Abu Ghosh is located in the middle of the Kiryat Yearim Ridge Route between Nicopolis and Jerusalem, nine miles (83 stadia) from the capital. A convent of Minorites with a Gothic church in Abu Ghosh was turned into a stable. Robinson dated it to the Crusader period and declared it "more perfectly preserved than any other ancient church in Palestine." Excavations carried out in 1944 corresponded with Crusader identification of the site as Emmaus.

Emmaus/Colonia/Motza/Ammassa/Ammaous/Beit Mizzeh

Colonia, between Abu Ghosh and Jerusalem on the Kiryat Yearim Ridge Route is another possibility. At a distance of 35 stadia (four miles) from Jerusalem, it was referred to as Motza in the Old Testament, the Talmud and the writings of Josephus Flavius. One mile to the north is a ruin called Beit Mizzeh, identified as the biblical Motza. Listed among the Benjamite cities of Joshua 18:26, it was referred to in the Talmud as a place where people would come to cut young willow-branches as a part of the celebration of Sukkot (Mishnah, Sukkah 4.5: 178). According to Josephus,[5] Amassa (ancient Latin manuscripts) or Ammaous (medieval Greek manuscripts) was about 3.5 Roman miles (30 stadia) or 7 miles (60 stadia) from Jerusalem. A group of 800 soldiers settled here after the First Jewish Revolt. It is believed that the Latin Amassa and the Greek Ammaous are derived from the Hebrew name Motza.[citation needed] Motza was identified as the biblical Emmaus by Birch, and later Savi.

Symbolic identification

One of the oldest extant versions of the Gospel of Luke, preserved in the Codex Bezae, reads "Oulammaus" instead of Emmaus. In Septuagint, the Greek translation of the Old Testament scriptures, Oulammaus was the place where Jacob was visited by God in his dream, while sleeping on a rock.[6] However, Oulammaus was not a real place name at all, but created only by an unfortunate translation mistake. The original name in Hebrew was "Luz". This mistake has long been corrected, but it was still there at the time when the Gospel was written around 100 AD. Thus, a theory has been put forward,[7] that the story in the Gospel was merely symbolic, wanting to draw a parallel between Jacob being visited by God and the disciples being visited by Jesus. This symbolic significance, however, would not preclude the account being historically accurate. To be noted also is that Jacob was sleeping on a rock and Jesus' main disciple Simon Peter was called by the name of rock (Petros).

References

  1. ^ Holy Bible: St. Luke 24: 13-35; Encyclopedia Judaica, Keter Publishing House, Jerusalem, 1972, "Emmaus," Vol. 6, pp. 726-727
  2. ^ Hooker, M. D. (1991). The Gospel according to Mark. London: A & C Black.
  3. ^ Emmaus Nicopolis, official site
  4. ^ Emmaus - Catholic Encyclopedia article
  5. ^ Jewish War 7.10.9
  6. ^ See Genesis 28:10-19.
  7. ^ Jenny Read-Heimerdinger: ‘Where is Emmaus?’, in Studies in the Early Text of the Gospels and Acts, D.J. Taylor (ed.), Birmingham University Press, pp. 229-44. Jenny Read-Heimerdinger with J. Rius-Camps: ‘Emmaous or Oulammaous? Luke’s Use of the Jewish Scriptures in the Text of Luke 24 in Codex Bezae’, Revista Catalana de Teologia 27, pp. 23-42.
  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh ed.). Cambridge University Press. 


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Contents

Emmaus is a borough in the Lehigh Valley region of Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is located five miles southwest of Allentown, the state's third largest city, after Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. In 2007, Money magazine listed Emmaus as one of the top 100 "Best Places to Live" in the U.S.

Get around

There is public transportation, the Lehigh and Northampton Transportation Authority (LANTA) bus, that can take you from Emmaus to Allentown and the greater Lehigh Valley area. [1].

Private bus lines, including Carl Bieber Tourways, provide daily roundtrip bus service between the Emmaus area and New York City, Philadelphia and several New Jersey beach locations.

Another great way of getting around Emmaus is renting a car.

Easy access to Emmaus is available via PA 309/Interstate 78 exits 55, 57 and 58.

  • Exit 55 is PA 29 (Cedar Crest Boulevard). Southbound will take you to just west of downtown.
  • Exit 57 is Lehigh Street. Southbound will take you onto Chestnut Street and into downtown. It also provides access to downtown Allentown to the north.
  • Exit 58 is Emaus Avenue. You are forced to go southbound anyway. This is just an easier parallel of Lehigh Street, but is only available to westbound 78 travelers.
  • Rodale Press is on Minor Street in Emmaus. Rodale publishes some of the nation's most widely-read health and activity magazines, including Men's Health, Prevention, Bicycling, among others. It also one of the nation's most prominent publishers of health-related books. Titles include the 2003 best-seller, The South Beach Diet.[2].
  • Shangy's is a famous beer distributor located on Main Street in Emmaus and one of the largest beer distributors on the East Coast. It advertises itself as having the largest number of beer brands from all over the world of any distributor in the nation. Shangy's attracts beer enthusiasts from around the nation, especially those looking for hard to find domestic or international beers.
  • Historic sites all throughout Emmaus. There's the Shelter House (610 S. Fourth St., 610-965-9258)[3], the Emmaus Historical Society Museum (563 Chestnut St., 610-966-6591)[4], the 1803 House (55 S. Keystone St.)[5], the Knauss Homestead (164 E. Main St., 610-965-9080)[6], and the Emmaus Moravian Church (Keystone & Main Streets, 610-965-6067)[7]

For more things to experience around Emmaus and Lehigh Valley, visit the Allentown, Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) or Easton pages.

  • Every February, Snowblast Winter Festival[8]
  • Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, Faschnacht & Forsythia Festival. Celebrating faschnachts (Pennsylvania Dutch donuts) and Emmaus' flower, the Forsythia by crowning the King Faschnact and Queen Forsythia and knighting the Defender of the Faschnact (great fun!)
  • Every April, Patriot's Day Dinner[9]
  • Last Monday in May, the Memorial Day Parade[10]
  • Every June, Art in the Garden[11]
  • Every July, Annual Clay Shoot
  • Every September, Wildlife Art Festival[12] and Community Heroes Day[13]
  • Saturday after Labor Day, Emmaus Heritage Day with crafters, food and beverage, live entertainment, activities, historic site tours, and free trolley rides
  • Weekend after Labor Day, Memory Day Craft Show[14]
  • Every October, Student Horror Film Contest & Festival[15]
  • Third Saturday in October, the Emmaus Halloween Parade takes place in Emmaus. It is one of the largest parades in the Lehigh Valley, typically drawing thousands from around the Valley. The Emmaus Lions Club is a primary parade sponsor. For more information on the Emmaus Lions Club, visit: [16].
  • First Saturday in December, Old Fashioned Christmas with horse and buggy rides, contests, strolling carolers, a tree lighting ceremony, and Santa comes to town.
  • Dorney Park & Wildwater Kingdom in South Whitehall Township, by Emmaus, is one of the premiere amusement and water parks in the nation, known especially for its elaborate rollercoasters and large waterpark.[17].
  • Emmaus Community Park is one of the many parks around the area. There is a pool open during the summer months. There are also fields to play baseball, softball, and soccer, and courts to play volleyball and basketball. There is also a walking trail. During the summer months, there are concerts in the park. [18]
  • Emmaus High School athletics. Located in Emmaus, Emmaus High School is one of several large Lehigh Valley high schools that competes athletically in the Lehigh Valley Conference, widely considered one of the most competitive athletic divisions in the United States. Emmaus High School athletic events typically draw large crowds, especially in football, boys and girls basketball, girls field hockey and wrestling. The school is widely known for its exceptional girls field hockey and boys and girls swimming and diving teams, both among the nation's best.
  • Indian Creek Golf Course. 18-hole Emmaus golf course.
  • Lehigh Valley IronPigs. The AAA-level minor league team of the Philadelphia Phillies plays in Coca-Cola Park in neighboring Allentown. Tickets: (610) 841-PIGS.[19].
  • Philadelphia Eagles. The Philadelphia Eagles hold their twice-a-day summer training camp practices each July and August at Lehigh University in neighboring Bethlehem.[20]. Attendance is free.
  • South Mountain is a perfect place to enjoy a hike or to go for a ride on a mountain bicycle.
  • Wildlands Conservancy, 3701 Orchid Place, 610-965-4397, [21]. Non-profit organization that puts together outdoor adventures, whether they be hiking and biking, canoeing, creeking.  edit
  • Within 10 miles of Emmaus. you'll find the Allentown Art Museum, America on Wheels museum, Civic Theatre, DaVinci Science Center, the Museum of Indian Culture (these and more found on the Allentown page), the Banana Factory, Burnside Plantation, Sands Casino (these and more found on the Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) page), the Crayola Factory, the National Canal Museum and the State Theatre (these and more found on the Easton page).  edit
  • The Emmaus Farmer's Market is held every Sunday from 10AM-2PM and is a great place to meet the locals and enjoy organic produce.[22]
  • The South Mall[23] is in the Emmaus area, which has stores such as Bon-Ton, Victoria's Secret, EB Games, etc.
  • There are other specialty stores located on Main Street in Emmaus, and they sometimes hold weekend street sales. Some of them are: Emmaus Jewelry Shop, The Finish Line Running Store, The Emmaus General store, Kim's Kountry Kreations. You'll also find a bunch of consignment shops, including Once Upon A Time (a children's consignment store) and Out of our Hands (local artisans; 244 Main St., 610-965-4806[24]).

For more places to shop around Emmaus and Lehigh Valley, visit the Allentown, Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) or Easton pages.

Eat

There are many restaurants in Emmaus, including:

  • Armetta's, 301 Main St., Emmaus, (610) 967-3050. Regionally famous Italian restaurant and pizzaria, highly-popular with locals. Italian food, pizza, Philadelphia cheesesteaks. Offers inside and patio dining, pick-up and local delivery.[25].
  • Blimpie's Subs and Salads, 4002 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 967-0686. Subs, sandwiches and salads for inside dining or to go.[26].
  • Buckeye Tavern on Brookside, 3741 Brookside Rd., Macungie, (610) 966-4411. Restaurant and tavern constructed in 1735 during British colonialism. Family-owned since 1987 with two of Lehigh Valley's leading chefs. American cuisine. Upstairs party room. Indoor and outdoor bar. Also offers take-out service.[27].
  • Cafe 29, 1301 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 966-2999. Bistro.[28].
  • Cavaluzzo's Pasta Steak & Subs, 1328 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 965-8070.
  • Chestnut Street Deli, 1458 Chestnut St, 610-965-3663.  edit
  • Dynasty Chinese Restaurant, 620 State Ave., Emmaus, (610) 965-2771.[29].
  • Emmaus Bakery, 415 Chestnut St, 610-965-2170.  edit
  • Emmaus Diner, 1418 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 967-5877.
  • The Farmhouse, 1449 Chestnut St, 610-967-6225, [30]. $$$.  edit
  • Fiesta Olé, 1116 Chestnut St., Emmaus. Fresh Mexican food, but best known for their fried ice cream. Upbeat Latin music and bright colors.[31].
  • Hillstone Restaurant, State Road Main, Emmaus, (610) 965-5750. Restaurant and bar.
  • Joe's Pizza II, 578 Chestnut St, 610-966-1080.  edit
  • Lee Gribben's on Main, 2nd & Main Sts., Emmaus, (610) 967-4409. High-end dining establishment. Formal. Bar separate from restaurant. Exceptional food among the best in the Lehigh Valley.[32].
  • Lee's Hoagie House, 634 State Ave., Emmaus, (484) 232-6277. Hoagies, Philadelphia cheese steaks.
  • Lin's Garden, 339 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 965-9300. American food, steaks.
  • Lingnan Chinese Restaurant, 1328 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 965-8373. Chinese.
  • Mamma Mia Pizzeria, 1245 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 967-0600. Pizza. Free delivery.
  • Mas Cafe, 332 Main St., Emmaus, (610) 421-8308. Deli and coffee house. Closed on Mondays. Free WiFi connection. Large selection of domestic and international coffees. Open microphone every Thursday evening from 7PM to 10PM.[33].
  • Mercantile Club, 427 Railroad St., Emmaus, (610) 965-3871. Private club founded in early 1900s and open only to members and their guests. Affordable meals and drinks. Daily entree specials. Various music entertainment and club events.[34].
  • Palace of India, 302 Main St., Emmaus, (610) 965-0466. Emmaus's only Indian restaurant.
  • Perk on Main, 228 Main St., Emmaus, (610) 966-0203. Independent coffeehouse.[35].
  • Pickle's Steak House, 3941 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 966-1986. Steak house. The name comes from the fact that they serve pickles on the table in place of bread.
  • Pizza World, 4030 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 966-8222. Pizza.
  • Rossi's Pizza & Italian, 606 State Avenue, Emmaus, (610) 967-6050. Italian, pizza and other entrees.
  • Superior Restaurant, State Road & Main Streets, Emmaus, (610) 965-5750. Diner.
  • Sweet Memories, 180 Main St, 610-967-0296.  edit
  • Traub's Doggie, 251 Main St., Emmaus, (610) 967-5003, a small but well-known hot dog establishment next to Armetta's.
  • Trivet, 4102 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 965-2838. Diner.
  • True Blue Coffeehouse and Bakery, 1301 Chestnut St. Emmaus, (610) 966-8555. Variety of coffees, lattes and bakery items.
  • Vera Cruz Cafe & Market, 3851 Main St. East, Emmaus, (610) 965-0772.
  • Volpe's Sports Bar, 501 Broad St., Emmaus, (610) 965-0311. Recently renovated sports bar with broad food and beer selections. Several large rooms, including the bar area. Formerly known as the Broad Street Saloon, it is still among the top places to go in Emmaus for affordable drinks, food and televised sports.
  • Wally's Deli, 1245 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 967-1347.
  • Yocco's South, 4042 Chestnut St., Emmaus, (610) 967-5555. The Emmaus location is one of six Lehigh Valley Yocco's establishments. Widely considered among the best hot dogs in the nation. Dine-in, take-out or drive-through service. Yocco's also does mail delivery to those not in the immediate Lehigh Valley area.[36].

For more places to eat around Emmaus and Lehigh Valley, visit the Allentown, Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) or Easton pages.

  • Armetta's, 301 Main Street, Emmaus, (610) 967-3050. Separate bar with a friendly drinking atmosphere. Beer specials. Outside patio bar open during summer.
  • Commix, 3245 Emaus Ave., Emmaus, (610) 797-9711. Historical but informal bar and restaurant on first floor of Revolutionary War-era hotel.
  • The Pub on Main, 102 E. Main St., Macungie, (610) 966-2275. Live bands every Saturday night. Also has weekly ladies night (Thursday nights), DJs, and karaoke nights (Friday nights). Daily drink specials and $2 beer drafts. Has clubs for both the Philadelphia Eagles and Pittsburgh Steelers. NFL Sunday Ticket games available during football season.[37].
  • Volpe's Sports Bar, 501 Broad St., Emmaus, (610) 965-0311. Recently renovated sports bar with over 10 large screen plasma televisions, including all out of town games. Broad food and beer selections. Several large rooms, including the bar area. Formerly known as the Broad Street Saloon, it is still among the top places to go in Emmaus for affordable drinks, beer and televised sports.

Sleep

There are no hotels in Emmaus, but there are a handful nearby. Check out the listings on the Allentown page.

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

EMMAUS, the name of two places in Palestine.

i. A village mentioned by Luke (xxiv. 13), without any indication of direction, as being 60 stadia (almost 7 m.), or according to some MSS.' 160 stadia, from Jerusalem. Its identification is a matter of mere guesswork: it has been sought at (a) EmmausNicopolis (see 2 below), distant 176 stadia from Jerusalem; (b) Kuryet el-' Enab, distant 66 stadia, on the carriage road to Jaffa; (c) Kulonieh, distant 36 stadia, on the same road; (d) el-Kubeibeh, distant 63 stadia, on the Roman road to Lydda; (e) `Urtas, distant 60 stadia; and (f) Khurbet el-Khamasa, distant 86 stadia, on the Roman road to Eleutheropolis. Of these, el-Kubeibeh or `Urtas seems the most probable, though many favour Kulonieh because of its nearness to Bet Mizza, in which name there is similarity with Emmaus, and because of a reading (30 stadia) in Josephus.

2. Emmaus-Nicopolis, now `Amwas, a town on the maritime plain, and a place of importance during the Maccabaean and Jewish wars. Near it Judas Maccabaeus defeated Gorgias in 164 B.e., and Vespasian established a fortified camp in A.D. 69. It was afterwards rebuilt and named Nicopolis, and became an episcopal see. It was also noted for a healing spring.


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From BibleWiki

hot baths, a village "three-score furlongs" from jerusalem, where our Lord had an interview with two of his disciples on the day of his resurrection (Lk 24:13). This has been identified with the modern el-Kubeibeh, lying over 7 miles north-west of Jerusalem. This name, el-Kubeibeh, meaning "little dome," is derived from the remains of the Crusaders' church yet to be found there. Others have identified it with the modern Khurbet Khamasa i.e., "the ruins of Khamasa", about 8 miles south-west of Jerusalem, where there are ruins also of a Crusaders' church. Its site, however has been much disputed.

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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Simple English

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Emmaus is a place in Palestine, where two people met Jesus after his Resurrection, according to the Gospel of Luke (Luke 24:13-16...28-31):

That very day two of them were going to a village (one hundred and) sixty stadia away from Jerusalem called Emmaus, and they were speaking about all the things that had occurred. And it happened that while they were speaking and debating, Jesus himself drew near and walked with them, but their eyes were prevented from recognizing him … As they approached the village to which they were going, he gave the impression that he was going on farther. But they urged him, ‘Stay with us, for it is nearly evening and the day is declining.’ So he went in to stay with them. And it happened that, while he was with them at table, he took bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them. With that their eyes were opened and they recognized him.

According to a very ancient Christian tradition, Emmaus is today's Arab village of Amwas, which lies 160 stadia (30 km, 19 miles) to the West of Jerusalem. It can take 6 to 7 hours to come from Jerusalem to Emmaus on foot, if one walks across the mountains of Judea. The place was called Nicopolis during the 3d-7th centuries AD. During Byzantine times, two big Basilicas (churches) where built here with beautiful mosaics and a baptistry (a place for baptism). Many manuscripts of the Gospel of Luke have a shorter distance between Jerusalem and Emmaus: 60 stadia (12 km, 7 miles). It is this distance which is found in modern printed Bibles. During the Crusader and Renaissance times many Christians, traveling to the Holy Land, were looking for Emmaus at the distance of 7 miles from Jerusalem. That's why several villages which lie 12 km away from Jerusalem were thought to be Emmaus. Even today one can find three Emmaus in the Holy Land: Emmaus Nicopolis, Qubeibe and Abu-Gosh!

Emmaus in Art

Coordinates: 31°50′21.48″N, 34°59′22.05″E

Bibliography

  • Emmaus-Nicopolis, official site [1]
  • Edward Robinson, "Researches in Palestine, Mount Sinai and Arabia Petrae", v. II. — Boston: 1841, p. 363 [2] , "Biblical Researches in Palestine and the Adjacent Regions, the Voyage of 1852". — Boston: 1856, p.p. 146-148 [3]
  • Strack, Billerbeck, "Kommentar zum Neuen Testament aus Talmud & Midrasch", v. II. — München: 1924, 1989, p.p. 269-271. ISBN 3406027253
  • Vincent, Abel "Emmaüs". — Paris: 1932.
  • P. Duvignau, Emmaüs, "Le site - le mystère". — Paris: 1937.
  • V. Michel, "Le complexe ecclésiastique d’Emmaüs-Nicopolis". — Paris, Sorbonne,1996-1997, pro manuscripto.
  • K.-H. Fleckenstein, M. Louhivuori, R. Riesner, "Emmaus in Judäa". — Giessen-Basel: 2003.ISBN 3-7655-9811-9

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