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Energy Poverty is a term for a lack of access to electricity, heat, or other forms of Power. Often referring to the situation of peoples in the developing world, the term also implies any quality of life issues relating to this lack of access.

Energy poverty is distinct from fuel poverty in that access is more of a problem than affordability. Energy poverty exists when the required infrastructure is not in place for energy delivery, most often electricity. Fuel poverty, on the other hand, exists when people do not have the ability to pay for energy, most often heating materials.

According to the Energy Poverty Action initiative of the World Economic Forum, "Access to energy is fundamental to improving quality of life and is a key imperative for economic development. In the developing world, energy poverty is still rife. Nearly 1.6 billion people still have no access to electricity, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA)."[1]

Domestic Energy Poverty

domestic energy poverty referes to a situation where a household does not have access or cannot afford to have the basic energy or energy services to achieve day to day living requirements. these requirements can change from country to country and region to region. the most common needs are lighting, cooking energy, domestic heating or cooling.

there is little information available on specific measure on the basic energy requirement. but many countries have identified that provision of 1 unit of electricity per day per household as a basic energy requirement. thus it is seen that in many developing countries the 30 units of elelctricity per month category is provided at a very concessionary rate.

Until recently energy poverty definitions took only the minimum energy quantity required in to consideration when defining energy poverty, but a different school of thought is that not only energy quantity but the quality and cleanliness of the energy used should be taken in to consideration when defining energy poverty.

one such definition read as "A person is in ‘energy poverty’ if they do not have access to at least: (a) the equivalent of 35 kg LPG for cooking per capita per year from liquid and/or gas fuels or from improved supply of solid fuel sources and improved (efficient and clean) cook stoves and (b) 120kWh electricity per capita per year for lighting, access to most basic services (drinking water, communication, improved health services, education improved services and others) plus some added value to local production An ‘improved energy source’ for cooking is one which requires less than 4 hours person per week per household to collect fuel, meets the recommendations WHO for air quality (maximum concentration of CO of 30 mg/M3 for 24 hours periods and less than 10 mg/ M3 for periods 8 hours of exposure), and the overall conversion efficiency in higher than 25%. ” [2]

References

  1. ^ Energy Poverty Action Inititive Brochure
  2. ^ [1]
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Energy Poverty is a term for a lack of access to electricity, heat, or other forms of Power. Often referring to the situation of peoples in the developing world, the term also implies any quality of life issues relating to this lack of access.

Energy poverty is distinct from fuel poverty in that access is more of a problem than affordability. Energy poverty exists when the required infrastructure is not in place for energy delivery, most often electricity. Fuel poverty, on the other hand, exists when people do not have the ability to pay for energy, most often heating materials.

According to the Energy Poverty Action initiative of the World Economic Forum, "Access to energy is fundamental to improving quality of life and is a key imperative for economic development. In the developing world, energy poverty is still rife. Nearly 1.6 billion people still have no access to electricity, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA)."[1]

Domestic Energy Poverty

Domestic energy poverty refers to a situation where a household does not have access or cannot afford to have the basic energy or energy services to achieve day to day living requirements. These requirements can change from country to country and region to region. The most common needs are lighting, cooking energy, domestic heating or cooling.

There is little information available on specific measure on the basic energy requirement, but many countries have identified that provision of 1 unit of electricity per day per household as a basic energy requirement.[citation needed], thus it is seen that in many developing countries the 30 units of electricity per month category is provided at a very concessionary rate.

Until recently energy poverty definitions took only the minimum energy quantity required in to consideration when defining energy poverty, but a different school of thought is that not only energy quantity but the quality and cleanliness of the energy used should be taken in to consideration when defining energy poverty.

One such definition read as:

"A person is in ‘energy poverty’ if they do not have access to at least:
(a) the equivalent of 35 kg LPG for cooking per capita per year from liquid and/or gas fuels or from improved supply of solid fuel sources and improved (efficient and clean) cook stoves
and
(b) 120kWh electricity per capita per year for lighting, access to most basic services (drinking water, communication, improved health services, education improved services and others) plus some added value to local production

An ‘improved energy source’ for cooking is one which requires less than 4 hours person per week per household to collect fuel, meets the recommendations WHO for air quality (maximum concentration of CO of 30 mg/M3 for 24 hours periods and less than 10 mg/ M3 for periods 8 hours of exposure), and the overall conversion efficiency in higher than 25%. ”[2]

References

  1. ^ Energy Poverty Action Initiative Brochure
  2. ^ [1]

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