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Entropion
Classification and external resources

Entropion and trichiasis secondary to trachoma
ICD-10 H02.0, Q10.2
ICD-9 374.0
DiseasesDB 29643
MedlinePlus 001008
eMedicine oph/212
MeSH D004774

Entropion is a medical condition in which the eyelids fold inward. It is very uncomfortable, as the eyelashes rub against the cornea constantly. Entropion is usually caused by genetic factors and may be congenital. Trachoma infection may cause scarring of the inner eyelid, which may cause entropion.

Contents

Symptoms

Symptoms of entropion include:

Treatment

Treatment is a simple surgery in which excess skin of the outer lids is removed. Prognosis is excellent if surgery is performed before the cornea is damaged.

Causes

  • Congenital
  • Aging
  • Scarring
  • Spasm

Entropion in dogs

Canine entropion

Entropion has been documented in most dog breeds, although there are some breeds (particularly purebreds) that are more commonly affected than others. These include the Akita, Pug, Chow Chow, Shar Pei, St. Bernard, Cocker Spaniel, Boxer, Springer Spaniel, Labrador Retriever, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Neapolitan Mastiff, Bull Mastiff, Great Dane, Irish Setter, Rottweiler, Poodle[1] and particularly Bloodhound.[2] The condition is usually present by six months of age. Entropion can also occur secondary to pain in the eye, scarring of the eyelid, or nerve damage. The upper or lower eyelid can be involved, and one or both eyes may be affected. When entropion occurs in both eyes, this is known as "bilateral entropion."

Upper lid entropion involves the eyelashes rubbing on the eye, but the lower lid usually has no eyelashes, so hair rubs on the eye. Surgical correction is used in more severe cases. A strip of skin and orbicularis oculi muscle are removed parallel to the affected portion of the lid and then the skin is sutured. Shar Peis, who often are affected as young as two or three weeks old, respond well to temporary eyelid tacking. The entropion is often corrected after three to four weeks, and the sutures are removed.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Gelatt, Kirk N. (ed.) (1999). Veterinary Ophthalmology (3rd ed. ed.). Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 0-683-30076-8.  
  2. ^ Bloodhound Health Concerns

External links

Humans
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