The Full Wiki

Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to Odo I, Duke of Burgundy article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Odo I, also known as Eudes, surnamed Borel and called the Red, (1058–23 March 1103) was Duke of Burgundy between 1079 and 1103. Odo was the second son of Henry of Burgundy and grandson of Robert I. He became the duke following the abdication of his older brother, Hugh I, who retired to become a Benedictine monk. Odo married Sibylla of Burgundy (1065 - 1101), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy.

They had:

An interesting incident is reported of this robber baron by an eyewitness, Eadmer, biographer of Anselm of Canterbury. While Saint Anselm was progressing through Odo's territory on his way to Rome in 1097, the bandit, expecting great treasure in the archbishop's retinue, prepared to ambush and loot it. Coming upon the prelate's train, the duke asked for the archbishop, whom they had not found. Anselm promptly came forward and took the duke by surprise, saying "My lord duke, suffer me to embrace thee." The flabbergasted duke immediately allowed the bishop to embrace him and offered himself as Anselm's humble servant.

He was a participant in the ill-fated Crusade of 1101.

See also

References

Preceded by
Hugh I
Duke of Burgundy
1079–1103
Succeeded by
Hugh II

Eudes I, surnamed Borel and called the Red, (1058–23 March 1103) was Duke of Burgundy between 1079 and 1103. Eudes was the second son of Henry of Burgundy and grandson of Robert I. He became the duke following the abdication of his older brother, Hugh I, who retired to become a Benedictine monk. Eudes married Sibylla of Burgundy (1065 - 1101), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy.

They had:

An interesting incident is reported of this robber baron by an eyewitness, Eadmer, biographer of Anselm of Canterbury. While Saint Anselm was progressing through Eudes's territory on his way to Rome in 1097, the bandit, expecting great treasure in the archbishop's retinue, prepared to ambush and loot it. Coming upon the prelate's train, the duke asked for the archbishop, whom they had not found. Anselm promptly came forward and took the duke by surprise, saying "My lord duke, suffer me to embrace thee." The flabbergasted duke immediately allowed the bishop to embrace him and offered himself as Anselm's humble servant.

He was a participant in the ill-fated Crusade of 1101.

See also

References

  • Gwatkin, H.M., Whitney, J.P. (ed) The Cambridge Medieval History: Volume II—The Rise of the Saracens and the Foundations of the Western Empire. Cambridge University Press, 1926.

Template:Start box |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Hugh I |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Duke of Burgundy
1079–1103 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Hugh II |- Template:End box

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message