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Eudora Welty
Born Eudora Alice Welty
April 13, 1909(1909-04-13)
Jackson, Mississippi, United States
Died July 23, 2001 (aged 92)
Jackson, Mississippi, United States
Occupation Author, photographer
Notable award(s) Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
1973 The Optimist's Daughter
Literature portal

Eudora Alice Welty (April 13, 1909 – July 23, 2001) was an award-winning American author who wrote short stories and novels about the American South. Her book, The Optimist's Daughter, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973 and Welty was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, among numerous awards. She was the first living author to have her works published by the Library of America. Her house in Jackson, Mississippi, is a National Historic Landmark and open to the public as a museum.

Contents

Photography

The headstone of Eudora Welty at Greenwood Cemetery in Jackson, Mississippi

During the 1930s, Welty worked as a publicity agent for the Works Progress Administration, a job that sent her around Mississippi. On her own time, she took some memorable photographs during the Great Depression of people from all economic and social classes. Collections of her photographs were published as One Time, One Place (1971) and Photographs (1989). Her photography was the basis for several of her short stories, including "Why I Live at the PO", which was inspired by a woman she photographed ironing in the back of a small post office.

Writing career

Welty was focused on her writing but continued to take photographs until the 1950s.[1] Her first short story, "Death of a Traveling Salesman", appeared in 1936. Her work attracted the attention of author Katherine Anne Porter, who became a mentor to Welty and wrote the foreword to Welty's first collection of short stories, A Curtain of Green, in 1941. The book immediately established Welty as one of American literature's leading lights and featured the stories "Why I Live at the P.O.", "Petrified Man", and the frequently anthologized "A Worn Path". Excited by the printing of Welty's works in such publications such as the Atlantic Monthly, the Junior League of Jackson, of which Welty was a member, requested permission from the publishers to reprint some of her works.

Her novel, The Optimist's Daughter, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1973. In 1992, Welty was awarded the Rea Award for the Short Story for her lifetime contributions to the American short story.

Welty was a charter member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, founded in 1987. She also taught creative writing at colleges and in workshops. She lived near Jackson's Belhaven College and was a common sight among the people of her hometown.

Honors

Short story collections

  • "Death of a Traveling Salesman" (separate short story), 1936
  • "A Worn Path" (separate short story), 1940
  • A Curtain of Green, 1941
  • The Wide Net and Other Stories, 1943
  • Music from Spain, 1948
  • The Golden Apples, 1949
  • Selected Stories, 1954
  • The Bride of the Innisfallen and Other Stories, 1955
  • Thirteen Stories, 1965
  • The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty, 1982
  • Moon Lake and Other Stories, 1980
  • Morgana: Two Stories from The Golden Apples, 1988

Novels

Literary criticism and non-fiction

  • Three Papers on Fiction (criticism), 1962
  • The Eye of the Story (selected essays and reviews), 1978
  • One Writer's Beginnings (autobiography), 1983
  • The Norton Book of Friendship (editor, with Roland A. Sharp), 1991
  • 3 Minutes or Less (selected essay), 2001

Commemoration

  • Eudora, the name given to the Internet email program developed by Steve Dorner in 1990, was inspired by Welty's story "Why I Live at the P.O."[9]
  • The state of Mississippi established a "Eudora Welty Day."

See also

References

  1. ^ Karen Rosenberg, "Eudora Welty's work as a young writer: Taking pictures", The New York Times, 14 Jan 2009, accessed 26 May 2009
  2. ^ Nicholas Dawidoff, "At Home with Eudora Welty' Only the Typewriter Is Silent", The New York Times, 10 Aug 1995, accessed 26 May 2009
  3. ^ Nicholas Dawidoff, "At Home with Eudora Welty' Only the Typewriter Is Silent", The New York Times, 10 Aug 1995, accessed 26 May 2009
  4. ^ a b Carol Ann Johnston, "Eudora Welty", The Mississippi Writer's Page, University of Mississippi, Feb 2006, accessed 25 May 2009
  5. ^ a b Suzanne Marrs, Eudora Welty: A Biography, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2005, p. 547
  6. ^ Dana Sterling, "Welty reads to audience at Helmerich award dinner", Tulsa World, December 7, 1991.
  7. ^ a b c d Suzanne Marrs, Eudora Welty: A Biography, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2005, p. 549
  8. ^ Carol Ann Johnston, "Eudora Welty", The Mississippi Writer's Page, University of Mississippi, Feb 2006, accessed 25 May 2009
  9. ^ Eudora e-mail program
  10. ^ [1]

Additional reading

  • Suzanne Marrs, Eudora Welty: A Biography, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2005

External links

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Eudora Welty (April 13, 1909July 23, 2001) was born in Jackson, Mississippi, United States.During the 1930s, Welty worked as a photographer for the Works Progress Administration.

Contents

Sourced

  • If you're so smart, why ain't you rich?
    • "Petrified Man", 1941

Unsourced

  • A good snapshot stops a moment from running away.
  • Life is lived in a private place; Where it means anything is inside the mind and heart.

On Writing

  • The story and its analyses are not mirror-opposites of each other. They are not reflections, either one. Criticism indeed is an art, as a story is, but only the story is to some degree a vision; there is no explanation outside fiction for what the writer is learning to do.

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

Simple English

Eudora Welty
Born Eudora Alice Welty
April 13, 1909(1909-04-13)
Jackson, Mississippi, United States
Died July 23, 2001 (aged 92)
Jackson, Mississippi, United States
Occupation Author, photographer
Notable award(s) Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
1973 The Optimist's Daughter

Eudora Alice Welty (April 13, 1909 – July 23, 2001) was an award-winning American author who wrote short stories and novels about the American South. Her book, The Optimist's Daughter, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973 and Welty was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, among numerous awards. She was the first living author to have her works published by the Library of America. Her house in Jackson, Mississippi, is a National Historic Landmark and open to the public as a museum.

Welty worked as a publicity agent for the work progress administration. She had to travel around Mississippi for her job. In her own time,she took memorable photographs. These mostly show how different people from all enonmic and social classes coped with the great depression. Collections of her photograph were published as (one time,one place)1971 and photograph(1989). Very often, a photograph was the basis of one of her short stories,including 'why i love at po',which was inspired by a woman she photographed ironing in the back of a small post office.


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