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Eugène Cormon
Born Pierre-Etienne Piestre
5 May 1810(1810-05-05)
Lyons
Died March 1903
Paris
Occupation DramatistLibrettist
Nationality French
Genres DramaComedyMelodramaOpera

Pierre-Etienne Piestre, known as Eugène Cormon (May 5, 1810 – March 1903), was a French dramatist and librettist. He used his mother’s name, Cormon, during his career.[1]

Cormon wrote dramas, comedies and, from the 1840s, libretti; around 150 of his works were published. He was stage manager at the Paris Opéra from 1859 to 1870, and administrator of the Théâtre du Vaudeville from 1874.

His libretti include Les dragons de Villars (with Lockroy), Gastibelza (with d’Ennery) and Les pêcheurs de Catane (with Carré) for Maillart, Les pêcheurs de perles (with Carré) for Bizet, Robinson Crusoé (with Crémieux) for Offenbach, and Les Bleuets (with Trianon) for Cohen. [2]

The Fontainebleau act of Don Carlos by Verdi is based on part of Philip II, King of Spain (Philippe II, Roi d’Espagne), an 1846 play by Cormon.[3]

At the Moscow Art Theatre in 1927 the seminal Russian theatre practitioner Constantin Stanislavski staged Cormon's melodrama The Gérard Sisters (Les Soeurs Gérard), which he co-wrote with Adolphe d'Ennery.[4]

References

  1. ^ Wright (1997).
  2. ^ Walsh (1981).
  3. ^ Budden (1985).
  4. ^ Benedetti (1999, 314, 388).

Sources

  • Benedetti, Jean. 1999. Stanislavski: His Life and Art. Revised edition. Original edition published in 1988. London: Methuen. ISBN 0413525201.
  • Budden, J. 1985. Verdi. London: Dent & Sons.
  • Walsh, T. J. 1981. Second Empire Opera: The Théâtre Lyrique Paris 1851-1870. London: John Calder.
  • Wright, L. 1997. "Eugène Cormon." In The New Grove Dictionary of Opera. London and New York: Macmillan.
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