The Full Wiki

More info on European Air Transport

European Air Transport: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

European Air Transport
IATA
QY
ICAO
BCS
Callsign
EUROTRANS
Founded 1971
Hubs Brussels Airport, Leipzig/Halle Airport
Fleet size 29
Destinations Europe, Middle East and Africa (some 56 countries are covered)
Parent company DHL Express
Headquarters Zaventem, Belgium
Key people Arthur White, Managing Director EAT
Website www.dhl.com/eat

European Air Transport N.V./S.A. is a cargo airline based in Zaventem near Brussels, Belgium. It is wholly owned by Deutsche Post World Net[1] and operates the group's DHL-branded parcel and express services in Europe. It also provides ad-hoc charter services including livestock transport. Its main base has been moved to Leipzig/Halle Airport.

Contents

History

[citation needed]

European Air Transport (EAT) was founded by two pilots, Mr. Pirlot de Corbion and Mr. Dessain, as an air taxi service. EAT started with a 2 aircraft, a Beechcraft Queen Air and a Gardan Horizon. It soon became clear that there was a need for pilots on the Belgian market, so EAT started a pilot training school. In 1973 EAT was the first Piper Flying Centre in Europe.

EAT expanded its activities by entering into a contract with DHL Worldwide Express in 1985. Just before that, DHL selected Brussels Airport as the location for its European Hub. The co-operation between EAT and DHL was so successful that in 1986 DHL decided to make EAT part of the DHL group, and thus became the major DHL airline for Europe and Africa. On 19 January 1993, EAT became a member of IATA. In the same year, EAT obtained the necessary permits for the transportation of a number of dangerous goods and live animals.

In 2002, Deutsche Post completed the takeover of DHL, making EAT a wholly-owned subsidiary.

In October 2004 Deutsche Post announced that Brussels Airport would no longer be DHL's major hub for Europe as from 2008, due to the failure of the Belgian Federal Government and Deutsche Post to reach an agreement on a framework to permit DHL to expand its future flight operations through Brussels Airport. As a consequence, Deutsche Post moved decided to make Leipzig/Halle Airport in Germany its new international aviation hub, with daily flights through Brussels and all major cities in Europe. EAT Headquarters remains in Brussels and will continue to be DHL's major European airline. EAT has a license for scheduled and unscheduled cargo flights all over the world. EAT employs more than 5000 people.

Destinations

European Air Transport operates services to Europe, Middle East and Africa. 56 countries are covered in total.[citation needed]

DHL Network in Europe:[2]
- Main Hub: Leipzig, Germany [LEJ]
- Regional Hubs: East Midland, UK [EMA] (serviced by EAT's sister airline DHL Air UK) / Brussels, Belgium [BRU] / Bergamo, Italy [BGY]
- Consolidation Hubs : Copenhagen, Denmark [CPH] / Vitoria, Spain [VIT]
- Commercial Hubs : Amsterdam, Netherlands [AMS], Paris CDG, France [CDG] / London Heathrow, UK [LHR] / Frankfurt, Germany [FRA] / Madrid, Spain [MAD]
- +75 air gateways

Fleet

Airbus A300B4 in old colour scheme

As of January 2009, the European Air Transport fleet consists of:[3]

Type Number Notes
Airbus A300B4-200F
18
Boeing 757-200F
11

Accidents and incidents

References

  1. ^ "Beteiligungsliste/Participation list". Jahresabschluss (HGB)/Annual Financial Statements (HGB). Deutsche Post AG. http://investors.dpwn.de/en/investoren/publikationen/archiv/2008/finanzpublikationen/dpwn_participation_list_group_2007_hv.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-01. 
  2. ^ http://dhl-gcs.com/site/2008/issue2/index.asp
  3. ^ Belgian civil aircraft register search, using "European Air Transport" as the Name of Holder search parameter, and European Air Transport fleet list at Planespotters.net. The Belgian civil register lists registration OO-DIC as an Airbus A319, however A319s did not exist in 1982 when OO-DIC was built. Searches conducted 21 January 2009.
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message