European Union visa lists: Wikis

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All European Union member states, with the exception of Ireland and the United Kingdom have a unified visa system as part of the Schengen Area. Three non-member states—Iceland, Norway and Switzerland—are also part of the Schengen Area and also implement the unified system. Bulgaria, Cyprus and Romania are not yet part of the Schengen Area, but maintain the same immigration policies as required by Schengen. Liechtenstein has signed up to Schengen but has yet to implement it. Ireland and the United Kingdom maintain independent immigration policies.

The United Kingdom and Ireland operate a passport-free zone called the Common Travel Area, with limited passport controls between them. While the land border is open with no fixed checkpoints, Ireland does, however, perform routine passport controls at airports, selective controls at ferry ports and spot checks on cross-border road and rail transport. A UK visa will not allow a traveller entry to Ireland, nor will an Irish visa allow entry to the UK.

It should be noted that the nationals of European Union member states, and those of Iceland, Norway, Switzerland are not just visa-exempt but are legally entitled to enter and reside in each other's countries, following the requirement of the EU's freedom of movement provisions, the European Economic Area Agreement and bilateral accords with Switzerland.

These lists cover only the visa requirements for regular passport holders. Most often, countries allow some holders of official (service or diplomatic) passport holders visa-free access while they require visas from regular passport holders. In rare cases, however, a country may also allow visa-free access for regular passport holders but require visas from official passport holders. These rules have not been unified even within those EU countries that have fully implemented the Schengen acquis.

Contents

Visa requirements for the Schengen Area

EU (Schengen) visa lists      EU member states     Special visa-free provisions (Schengen treaty, OCT or other)     Visa required to enter the EU - annex I countries      Visa-free access to the EU for 90 days - annex II countries      Visa-status unknown, listed neither in annex I nor in II

As of 2001 the European Union issues two lists regarding visas: a white list of countries whose nationals do not require visas[1] and a black list of countries whose nationals do require visas.[2] Visa-exempt nationals are entitled to enter and remain in the Schengen Area for up to three months within half a year; most signatory states do not allow these visa-exempt nationals to carry out remunerative activities during this period.

The following individuals can enter the Schengen Area, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Liechtenstein and Romania without a visa:

As of right
Visa-exempt countries and territories
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Transit visas

As of 5 April 2010, common visa requirements for the airport transit will be introduced by the European Union.[8] From that date on, citizens of the following countries will need transit visas unless they:

  • hold a Schengen visa, a national long-stay visa or a residence permit issued by an EU member state,
  • hold certain residence permits issued by Andorra, Canada, Japan, San Marino or the United States guaranteeing the holder's unconditional readmission to that country,
  • hold a valid visa for an EU member state or for a member of the European Economic Area Agreement, Canada, Japan or the United States of America, or when they return from those countries after having used the visa,
  • are family members of an EU citizen,
  • hold a diplomatic passport, or
  • are flight crew members whose state of nationality is a party to the Chicago Convention on International Civil Aviation.

Reciprocity

Reciprocity is sought for all countries of the visa-free list. That means that the EU expects that these countries offer visa-free access to all EU citizens and to the citizens of Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. When the situation is the opposite the affected Schengen member state is expected to notify the European Commission, so that the EC takes an appropriate action - negotiate with the annex II state or remove it from the annex II list. All of the states that implement the Schengen visa rules (including Norway, Iceland, Bulgaria, Romania and Cyprus) with the exception of Switzerland have notified the European Commission about non-compliant third states. Switzerland has so far made no notifications, but this could be because there are no reciprocity issues for Swiss citizens.

Since adoption of this policy full reciprocity has been achieved with the following countries (listed in order of achieving reciprocity): Nicaragua, Venezuela, Uruguay, Costa Rica, Mexico, New Zealand, Israel,[9] Malaysia, Paraguay, Panama, Singapore, in addition to the Chinese special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macao. [10]

In addition, the New Zealand Government Travel Advisory [2] website lists a number of Schengen countries where New Zealanders have several additional bilateral visa waiver agreements. In these countries New Zealanders can spend up to three months, without reference to time spent in other Schengen area countries.

According to the most recent fifth report on visa reciprocity issued on 19 October 2009[11] the following countries are still not implementing it fully:

  • Australia (the European Commission has yet to evaluate for compliance the eVisitor system of Australia which covers all member states, but for which certain application provisions will be assessed);
  • Brunei (which restricts the visa waiver to 30 days in contrast to the 90 days granted by the EU):
  • Brazil: Brazil still requires visas of Cypriots, Maltese, Estonians and Latvians. Because of internal Brazilian procedures resolving this issue will require a visa-waiver agreement with the EU that is currently under negotiation;
  • Canada (which requires visas of Bulgarians and Romanians as well as of Czechs which was an important setback to the visa reciprocity policy because Canada reintroduced a visa requirement for Czechs on 13 July 2009;[12])
  • Japan (which currently allows visa-free access to all citizens of the European Union but employs only a temporary visa waiver for Romanians until the end of 2011) and the
  • United States (which maintains visa requirements for Bulgarians, Cypriots, Greeks (until April 5, 2010, when Greece officially joins the Visa Waiver Program), Poles and Romanians; furthermore certain provisions of the expected US ESTA system — such as application fee — will be assessed).

United Kingdom visa requirements

UK visa lists      EU member states     Special visa-free provisions (EEA, OCT or other)      Visa-free access to the UK for 6 months      Visa required to enter the UK, transit without visa      Visa required to enter the UK and for transit through the UK      Visa-status unknown

In July 2008, the UK announced the results of its first global review of those needs a visa to come to the UK[13] against a set of strict criteria to determine the level of risk they pose to the UK in terms of illegal immigration, crime and security. The review would determine whether the nationals of 11 countries would require visas by the end of 2008, unless the countries in question take measures to reduce the perceived risk they pose to the UK. The new visa rules announced on 9 January 2009 require that the nationals of South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho and Bolivia to obtain a visa; only Venezuelan nationals traveling on electronic passports issued since 2007 may enter the UK without a visa;[14] and the existing visa-free status for the nationals of Botswana, Brazil, Malaysia, Mauritius, Namibia and Trinidad and Tobago is maintained.[15]

The following individuals can enter the United Kingdom without a visa:

As of right
Visa-exempt
  • Citizens of the following countries and territories:[16]

Transit visas

Citizens of the following countries need transit visas:

Ireland visa requirements

IE visa lists      EU member states     Special visa-free provisions (EEA, OCT or other)      Visa-free access to Ireland for 90 days      Visa required to enter Ireland, transit without visa      Visa required to enter Ireland and for transit through Ireland

Citizens of the following countries can enter Ireland without a visa:[19]

As of right
Visa-exempt

Transit visas

Citizens of the following countries need transit visas:

Summary of visa-free travel to the European Union

Citizens of the countries listed here can enter the European territory of the EU without a visa. The visa requirements for non-European territories of EU member states are different.

Country Schengen Area, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Romania[20] Ireland[21] United Kingdom[22]
 Andorra Yes Yes Yes
 Antigua and Barbuda Yes Yes Yes
 Argentina Yes Yes Yes
 Australia Yes Yes Yes
 Bahamas Yes Yes Yes
 Barbados Yes Yes Yes
 Belize No Yes Yes
 Bermuda Yes Yes Yes
 Bolivia No Yes No
 Botswana No Yes Yes
 Brazil Yes Yes Yes
 Brunei Yes Yes Yes
 Canada Yes Yes Yes
 Chile Yes Yes Yes
 Costa Rica Yes Yes Yes
 Croatia Yes Yes Yes
 Dominica No Yes Yes
 Timor-Leste No No Yes
 El Salvador Yes Yes Yes
 Fiji No Yes No
 Grenada No Yes Yes
 Guatemala Yes Yes Yes
 Guyana No Yes No
 Honduras Yes Yes Yes
 Hong Kong[5] Yes Yes Yes
 Israel Yes Yes Yes
 Japan Yes Yes Yes
 Kiribati No Yes Yes
 Lesotho No Yes No
 Macau[6] Yes Yes Yes
 Macedonia Yes[18] No No
 Malawi No Yes No
 Malaysia Yes Yes Yes
 Maldives No Yes Yes
 Marshall Islands No No Yes
 Mauritius Yes No Yes
 Mexico Yes Yes Yes
 Micronesia No No Yes
 Monaco Yes Yes Yes
 Montenegro Yes[18] No No
 Namibia No No Yes
 Nauru No Yes Yes
 New Zealand Yes Yes Yes
 Nicaragua Yes Yes Yes
 Palau No No Yes
 Panama Yes Yes Yes
 Papua New Guinea No No Yes
 Paraguay Yes Yes Yes
 Saint Kitts and Nevis Yes Yes Yes
 Saint Lucia No Yes Yes
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines No Yes Yes
 Samoa No Yes Yes
 San Marino Yes Yes Yes
 Serbia Yes[7][18] No No
 Seychelles Yes Yes Yes
 Singapore Yes Yes Yes
 Solomon Islands No Yes Yes
 South Africa No Yes No
 South Korea Yes Yes Yes
 Swaziland No Yes No
 Taiwan No Yes Yes
 Tonga No Yes Yes
 Trinidad and Tobago No Yes Yes
 Tuvalu No Yes Yes
 United States Yes (except
 Northern Mariana Islands)
Yes Yes
 Uruguay Yes Yes Yes
 Vanuatu No Yes Yes
 Vatican City Yes Yes Yes
 Venezuela Yes Yes Yes[18]
United Kingdom British National (Overseas) Yes Yes Yes
United Kingdom British Overseas Territories citizens (other than Gibraltarians[23]) No (except
 Bermuda)
Yes Yes
United Kingdom British Overseas citizens No No Yes
United Kingdom British subject who do not have the right of abode in the UK[24] No No Yes
United Kingdom British protected persons No No Yes

See also

References

  1. ^ As listed in annex II of the Council Regulation 539/2001.
  2. ^ As listed in annex I of the Council Regulation 539/2001.
  3. ^ "Table of countries whose citizens require/do not require visas to enter Germany". German Foreign Office. 21 December 2009. http://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/diplo/en/WillkommeninD/EinreiseUndAufenthalt/StaatenlisteVisumpflicht.html. Retrieved 14 February 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f European Union visa waiver agreement concluded with the state (as opposed to bilateral agreements between some member state and third countries). Provisional application and ratification is processing (completed for Seychelles [1]).
  5. ^ a b c d Persons holding a Hong Kong Special Administrative Region passport. See also British National (Overseas) for persons residing in Hong Kong holding a form of British nationality.
  6. ^ a b c d Persons holding a Macau Special Administrative Region passport.
  7. ^ a b Visas are required from Serbian citizens holding passports issued by the Serbian Coordination Directorate where Serbian citizens who reside in Kosovo have to apply for their Serbian passport.
  8. ^ Council regulation No. 810/2009 of 13 July 2009, Annex IV
  9. ^ Strictly speaking, full reciprocity is not achieved with Israel as German citizens born before 1 January 1928 need a visa for Israel. The German government, however, has obviously avoided to report this fact to the European Commission.
  10. ^ EU Visa policy reports
  11. ^ Fifth visa reciprocity breach report
  12. ^ "In These Times" report on the reintroduction of the visa requirement for Czech citizens
  13. ^ UK Border Agency Results of Britain's first global visa review
  14. ^ UK Border Agency New countries face tough visa rules (09/02/2009)
  15. ^ BBC News Countries face new UK visa rules
  16. ^ UK Border Agency. "Visa and Direct Airside Transit Visa (DATV) nationals". http://www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en/doineedvisa/visadatvnationals. Retrieved 14 February 2010. 
  17. ^ Only for holders with their own personal ID numbers stipulated in their respective passports
  18. ^ a b c d e Citizens with biometric passport only.
  19. ^ Citizens' Information Ireland - "Visa requirements for entering Ireland"
  20. ^ Consolidated version of Council regulation No. 539/2001, as of 19 January 2007
  21. ^ Do I need a Visa to come to Ireland? (Official site)
  22. ^ Do I need a visa? by UK Border Agency
  23. ^ Gibraltarians are United Kingdom nationals for European Union purposes, making them entitled to the EU's freedom of movement provisions as of right.
  24. ^ British subjects with the right of abode in the United Kingdom are United Kingdom nationals for European Union purposes, making them entitled to the EU's freedom of movement provisions as of right.

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