The Full Wiki

Eutychus: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the early Christian theologian, see Eutyches, for the Exarch of Ravenna see Eutychius.

Eutychus was a young man tended to by St. Paul. He fell asleep due to the long nature of the discourse Paul was giving and fell from his seat out of a three story window. Paul then picked him up, insisting that he was not dead, and carried him back upstairs; those gathered then had a meal and a long conversation which lasts until dawn. After Paul left, Eutychus was found to be alive. This is related in the New Testament book of Acts 20:9-12.

It is unclear whether the story intends to relate that Eutychus was killed by the fall and Paul raised him, or whether he simply seemed to be dead, with Paul ensuring that he is still alive. Recent translations of the text differ on this point.[1][2]

The name Eutychus means "fortunate".

Contents

References

Further reading

  • Arndt, William & Gingrich, F.W. (1967), Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament (University of Chicago Press).
  • Barclay, William (1955), The Acts of the Apostles (Philadelphia: Westminster Press).
  • Bruce, F.F. (1977), Paul: Apostle of the Heart Set Free (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans).
  • Oster, Richard (1979), The Acts of the Apostles, Part II (Austin, TX: Sweet Publishing Company).

See also

External links

Advertisements

Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki


fortunate, (Acts 20:9-12), a young man of Troas who fell through drowsiness from the open window of the third floor of the house where Paul was preaching, and was "taken up dead." The lattice-work of the window being open to admit the air, the lad fell out and down to the court below. Paul restored him to life again. (Comp. 1 Kings 17:21; 2 Kings 4:34.)

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

what mentions this? (please help by turning references to this page into wiki links)


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message