Evan Longoria: Wikis

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Evan Longoria

Tampa Bay Rays — No. 3
Third Baseman
Born: October 7, 1985 (1985-10-07) (age 24)
Downey, California
Bats: Right Throws: Right 
MLB debut
April 12, 2008 for the Tampa Bay Rays
Career statistics
(through 2009 season)
Batting average     .277
Home runs     60
Runs batted in     198
On-base percentage     .355
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Evan Michael Longoria[1][2] (born October 7, 1985, in Downey, California) is a Major League Baseball third baseman for the Tampa Bay Rays. Formerly, Longoria was a star infielder for the Long Beach State college baseball team, the 2005 Cape Cod League MVP, and the 2006 Big West Co-Player of the Year.

He made his major league debut for the Rays in 2008, and was named to the American League team for the 2008 MLB All Star Game. Longoria was also named the 2008 American League Rookie of the Year on November 10.[3]

Contents

High-school baseball career

Longoria attended St. John Bosco High School. He was a two-year letterman in baseball and as a senior was a first team All-Serra League selection. Longoria did not receive any scholarship offers to play college baseball.

College Baseball career

After high school, Longoria attended Rio Hondo Community College, where he played shortstop. In his freshman season, Longoria earned first-team All-State honors, and was offered a scholarship by Long Beach State. He transferred to Long Beach for his sophomore year and hit .320, earning All-Conference honors. Because Long Beach State already had an established shortstop, Troy Tulowitzki (who now plays with the Colorado Rockies), Longoria played third base.

Following a successful MVP summer in the Cape Cod League with the Chatham A's where he played second base,[4] Longoria shared 2006 Big West Player of the Year honors (with Justin Turner) during his junior year at Long Beach State. He played for the Wallbanger under the manager Andrew Takayoshi. When he first started attending Long Beach State, he majored in kinesiology. However, he switched to the department of Criminal Justice because it was somewhat less time-consuming and, therefore, would not interfere with the baseball schedule as much.

Professional baseball career

Longoria was selected by the Tampa Bay Rays with the third overall pick in the 2006 Major League Baseball Draft. Longoria, called the "best pure hitter" among college players in the 2006 draft class by Baseball America, was given a $3 million signing bonus.[5]

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Minor leagues

After signing with the Rays, Longoria tore through his first assignments in the minor leagues. After just eight games with the Single-A Hudson Valley Renegades, Longoria moved up to the Visalia Oaks and impressed the organization with his quick success, hitting .327 with 8 home runs and 28 RBI in 28 games. This earned him a promotion to the Double-A Montgomery Biscuits where he hit .267 with 6 home runs through the end of the season, and hit .345 in the postseason, including a walk-off two run home run in the Southern League Division Playoffs to put Montgomery into the championship. He was widely considered the top third base prospect in the minors and one of the top prospects at any position. [6][7]

Longoria followed up his successful debut with another stellar year in 2007. Starting the year with Montgomery, Longoria hit .307 with 21 home runs and 76 RBI in 105 games for the Biscuits before a late season promotion to the Triple-A Durham Bulls. In 31 games with the Bulls, he hit .269 with 5 home runs and 19 RBIs, but also had 29 strikeouts. He finished 2007 with a combined average of .299, 26 home runs, 95 RBIs, and 73 walks for an OBP of .402.

In October 2007, sportswriter Ken Rosenthal opined that Longoria "might be next season's Ryan Braun, making a rapid ascent to the majors."[8] Some scouts have in particular said that the way that the ball "explodes off his bat" reminds them of Braun. He was expected to start at third for Tampa Bay in 2008 with the move of Akinori Iwamura to second base, but ultimately failed to make the opening day roster and was optioned to Triple-A Durham. According to reports, the Rays elected to send him down to complete his development, citing his short 31 game stint in Durham and drawing comparisons to the seasons of two other highly-heralded 3rd base prospects.

Major leagues

2008

Evan Longoria in 2008

On April 12, 2008, the Rays placed Willy Aybar on the disabled list and called up Longoria from Triple-A Durham to replace him on the major league roster and on the 40-man roster. Longoria made his major league debut that night going 1 for 3 with an RBI.

Longoria hit his first career home run on April 14, against the New York Yankees at Tropicana Field. He had his first career two-homer game on May 24, and drove in six runs as the Rays defeated the Baltimore Orioles 11-4. Both of the homers came off the Orioles' Steve Trachsel, a Long Beach State alumnus. On July 19, 2008, Longoria hit his first career grand slam off Toronto's Roy Halladay in the fifth inning as part of a 6-4 winning effort.

On April 18, the Rays signed Longoria to a six-year, $17.5 million contract with options for 2014, 2015 and 2016. The first six years of the contract cover his arbitration years, with three more years added by team options. If the team exercises its one-year option for 2014, and then its two-year option for the 2015 and 2016 seasons, the deal could be worth up to $44 million.[9][10]

On July 10, Longoria won the 2008 All-Star game AL Final Fan vote over outfielder Jermaine Dye of the Chicago White Sox, outfielder Jose Guillen of the Kansas City Royals, first baseman Jason Giambi of the New York Yankees, and second baseman Brian Roberts of the Baltimore Orioles. Longoria went 1-4 in the game and hit a game-tying ground-rule double in the bottom of the eighth inning. On August 11, Longoria was placed on the disabled list with a fractured wrist. [11]

On September 18, Longoria had his first three home run game against the Minnesota Twins at Tropicana Field. On September 20, Longoria caught the game-ending out, from Joe Mauer in foul territory as the Rays clinched their first playoff spot in team history.

Longoria has used "I'm Broken" by Pantera and currently is using "Down and Out" by Tantric as his at-bat music.

On October 2, in the first postseason game for both Longoria and Tampa Bay, Longoria hit two home runs in his first two at-bats to help lead the Rays past the Chicago White Sox 6-4. Longoria is the first rookie and second player overall to homer in his first two postseason at bats. The first to do so was Longoria's hitting coach at Triple-A Durham, Gary Gaetti, who had his historic effort with the Minnesota Twins in 1987.

On October 14, 2008, Longoria set the rookie mark for most home runs (4) hit in a postseason series as a rookie, breaking Miguel Cabrera's record set in 2003.

After the 2008 season, Longoria was honored with The Sporting News Rookie of the Year Award for the American League[12], as well as the American League Rookie of the Year Award.[3]. He became the fourth third baseman to win the award. He also became the sixth player and the first since Nomar Garciaparra in 1997 to win a Rookie of the Year Award unanimously[13]. He was also named the third baseman on the Topps Rookie All-Star Team.

World Baseball Classic (2009)

Longoria was called upon on March 19, 2009, to replace Chipper Jones in the World Baseball Classic.[14]

2009

Evan Longoria in 2009

In April, Longoria knocked in his 100th career RBI, in his 135th game. The only then-active players to get to 100 RBIs more quickly were Ryan Braun (118 games) and Albert Pujols (131 games).[5] At the end of April, Longoria became the first player in Rays franchise history to be named the AL Player of the Month. He had also won two of the four Player of the Week awards for the month of April.[15] Longoria drove in 131 runs in his first 162 games in the majors, the third-highest total through May 2009 of any active player, 3 RBIs behind Ryan Braun, and 2 RBIs behind Pujols.[6] Longoria was selected by the fans to start the 2009 MLB All Star Game on July 5, 2009. Due to a finger injury, he was kept out of the lineup. [16]

Longoria was given the American League Gold Glove Award for his position on November 10.[17] Two days later, he was given a Silver Slugger Award.[18]

Career statistics

Year Age Team Lg G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS+ TB SH SF IBB HBP GDP
2008 22 Rays AL 122 448 67 122 31 2 27 85 7 0 46 122 .272 .343 .531 127 238 0 8 4 6 8
2009 23 Rays AL 157 584 100 164 44 0 33 113 9 0 72 140 .281 .364 .526 130 307 0 7 11 8 27
Totals: 279 1032 167 286 75 2 60 198 16 0 118 262 .277 .355 .528 129 545 0 15 15 14 35

Roll over stat abbreviations for definitions. Stats through October 4, 2009.[19]

Endorsements

Longoria was named the cover athlete for Major League Baseball 2K10, replacing Tim Lincecum.[20]

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ a b Joe Smith (2008-11-10). "Tampa Bay Rays' Longoria wins AL Rookie of the Year". Tampabay.com. http://blogs.tampabay.com/rays/2008/11/longoria-wins-a.html. Retrieved 2008-11-10. 
  4. ^ Chuck, Bill. 100 random things about the Red Sox, Rays, and Yankees, The Boston Globe. Published April 2, 2009. Retrieved May 2, 2009.
  5. ^ Minor League News: Longoria
  6. ^ http://www.usatoday.com/sports/baseball/minors/2007-08-13-player-of-year-voting_N.htm
  7. ^ http://web.minorleaguebaseball.com/milb/news/top50/y2008/
  8. ^ [3]
  9. ^ Rays lock up top prospect Longoria with long-term deal
  10. ^ http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20080418&content_id=2546402&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb
  11. ^ [4]
  12. ^ Carrie Muskat (2008-10-22). "Soto, Longoria recognized by players". http://chicago.cubs.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20081022&content_id=3636598&vkey=news_chc&fext=.jsp&c_id=chc. Retrieved 2008-10-22. 
  13. ^ Alden Gonzalez (2008-11-10). "Longoria Named AL Rookie of the Year". MLB.com. http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20081110&content_id=3672690&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb. Retrieved 2008-11-10. 
  14. ^ http://tampabay.rays.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20090319&content_id=4035192&vkey=news_tb&fext=.jsp&c_id=tb
  15. ^ http://www.tampabay.com/sports/baseball/rays/article998399.ece
  16. ^ http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/baseball/mlb/07/14/longoria.figgins.ap/index.html
  17. ^ Longoria nabs Gold Glove Award
  18. ^ Tampa Bay Rays 3B Evan Longoria wins Silver Slugger Award
  19. ^ "Evan Longoria Statistics". Baseball-Reference. http://www.baseball-reference.com/l/longoev01.shtml. Retrieved 2009-11-12. 
  20. ^ 2K Sports (2009-11-24). "2K Sports Signs 2009 Gold Glove Award Winner Evan Longoria of the Tampa Bay Rays® as Cover Athlete for Major League Baseball® 2K10". 2K Sports. http://2ksports.com/news/2ksports/369. 

External links

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Dustin Pedroia
American League Rookie of the Year
2008
Succeeded by
Andrew Bailey
Preceded by
Dustin Pedroia
Sporting News AL Rookie of the Year
2008
Succeeded by
Gordon Beckham
Preceded by
Dustin Pedroia
Players Choice AL Most Outstanding Rookie
2008
Succeeded by
Gordon Beckham
Preceded by
Hank Blalock
Ben Zobrist
AL Player of the Week
April 5-12, 2009
Succeeded by
Ian Kinsler
Zack Greinke
Preceded by
Shin-Soo Choo
American League Player of the Month
April, 2009
Succeeded by
Joe Mauer
Preceded by
Adrián Beltré
AL Gold Glove (Third Base)
2009
Succeeded by
Incumbent

Simple English

Evan Longoria
Tampa Bay Rays — No. 3
Third baseman
Born: October 7, 1985 (1985-10-07) (age 25)
Downey, California
Bats: Right Throws: Right 
MLB debut
April 12, 2008 for the Tampa Bay Rays
Career statistics
(through 2009 season)
Batting average    .277
Home runs    60
Runs batted in    198
On-base percentage    .355
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • 2x All-Star selection (2008, 2009)
  • 2008 AL Rookie of the Year
  • 2009 AL Player of the Month award for April
  • 1x Gold Glove Award winner (2009)
  • 1x Silver Slugger Award winner (2009)
  • Evan Michael "Longo" Longoria is a third baseman for the Tampa Bay Rays. He won the 2008 American League Rookie of the Year award. In 2009, he won the Silver Slugger and Gold Glove awards for American League third basemen.

    Other websites

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    Awards and achievements
    Preceded by
    Dustin Pedroia
    American League Rookie of the Year
    2008
    Succeeded by
    Incumbent
    Preceded by
    Dustin Pedroia
    Sporting News AL Rookie of the Year
    2008
    Succeeded by
    Incumbent
    Preceded by
    Dustin Pedroia
    Players Choice AL Most Outstanding Rookie
    2008
    Succeeded by
    Incumbent



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