The Full Wiki

More info on Execution methods

Execution methods: Wikis

  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quartering

This is a list of methods of capital punishment.

Method Description
Animals
Boiling to death This penalty was carried out using a large cauldron filled with water, oil, tar, tallow, or even molten lead.
Breaking back A Mongolian method of execution that avoided the spilling of blood on the ground[2]
Breaking wheel Also known as the Catherine wheel
Buried alive
Burning Supposed to have been popular for executing for religious heretics and witches, though this has been contested as largely a myth.
Cooking
Crucifixion Roping or nailing to a wooden cross or similar apparatus (such as a tree) and allowing to perish.
Crushing By a weight, abruptly or as a slow ordeal.
Decapitation Also known as beheading.
Disembowelment
Dismemberment Being drawn and quartered sometimes resulted in dismemberment.
Drawing and quartering
Drowning
Electrocution The electric chair
Explosives
Falling
Flaying Cutting off the skin
Garrote
Gassing Asphyxiation by gas in a sealed chamber
Guillotine
Hanging
Immurement Being left to die of starvation or dehydration.
Impalement
Lethal injection
Pendulum[3] A type of machine with an axe head for a weight that slices closer to the victim's torso over time
Poisoning
Sawing
Scaphism
Shooting
Slow slicing
Stabbing
Starvation / Dehydration Immurement
Stoning
Strangulation

References

  1. ^ This Won't Hurt a Bit: A Painlessly Short (and Incomplete) Evolution of Execution.
  2. ^ Chingis Khan
  3. ^ R.D. Melville (1905), "The Use and Forms of Judicial Torture in England and Scotland," The Scottish Historical Review, vol. 2, p. 228; Geoffrey Abbott (2006) Execution: the guillotine, the Pendulum, the Thousand Cuts, the Spanish Donkey, and 66 Other Ways of Putting Someone to Death, MacMillan, ISBN 0312352220, p. 213. Both refer to the use of the pendulum (pendola)by inquisitorial tribunals. Melville, however, refers only to its use as a torture method, while Abbott suggests that the device was purposely allowed to kill the victim if he refused to confess.

External links








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message