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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An expansion pack, expansion set, or supplement is an addition to an existing role-playing game, tabletop game or video game. These add-ons usually add new game areas, weapons, objects, and/or an extended storyline to a complete and already released game. While board game expansions are typically designed by the original creator, video game developers sometimes contract out development of the expansion pack to third-party company, or it may choose to develop the expansion itself (see Hellfire for Diablo). Board games and RPGs have been marketing expansions since at least the early 1970s.

Contents

Summary

The price of an expansion pack is usually much less than that of the original game. As expansion packs consist solely of additional content, most expansion packs require the original game in order to play. Games with many expansions often begin selling the original game with prior expansions, such as The Sims Deluxe Edition (The Sims with The Sims: Livin' Large). These bundles make the game more accessible to new players. When games reach the end of their lifespan, the publisher often releases a 'complete' or 'gold' collection which includes the game and all its subsequent expansions.

Stand-alone expansion packs

Some expansion packs do not require the original game in order to use the new content, as is the case with Blue Shift or Sonic & Knuckles. In some cases, a standalone expansion such as Heroes of Might and Magic III: The Shadow of Death or Dungeon Siege: Legends of Aranna includes the original game. Standalone expansions are preferred by game retailers since they require less shelf space and are generally easier to move since they don't carry the prerequisite of owning the original game. Often, enhanced games or anthologies released as "Game of the Year edition", "Director's Cut", etc. are examples of standalone expansions. In some standalone packs if you do not have the original or other you can't use certain units or races contained in the other games in multiplayer.

Video game expansion packs

Expansion packs are most commonly released for computer games, but are becoming increasingly prevalent for video game consoles, particularly due to the popularity of online console services such as Xbox Live and the PlayStation Network. One such console expansion pack would be the Halo 2 Multiplayer Map Pack which contain 9 new maps and updates for the game that were only available for Xbox Live users to all gamers. The increasing number of multi-platform games has also led to the release of more expansion packs on consoles, especially stand-alone expansion packs (as described above). Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath, for example, requires the original Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars to play on the PC, but Xbox 360 versions of both the original Tiberium Wars and Kane's Wrath are available, neither of which require one another.

Grand Theft Auto: London, 1969 was the first expansion pack released for the PlayStation. The game required the player to insert the London disc, remove it, insert the original Grand Theft Auto disc, remove it, then insert the London disc again in order to play.

Sonic & Knuckles for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis was unusual in that it functioned as both a stand alone cartridge and as an expansion pack for both Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and Sonic the Hedgehog 3.

See also



An expansion pack, expansion set, or supplement is an addition to an existing role-playing game, tabletop game or video game. These add-ons usually add new game areas, weapons, objects, and/or an extended storyline to a complete and already released game. While board game expansions are typically designed by the original creator, video game developers sometimes contract out development of the expansion pack to third-party company, or it may choose to develop the expansion itself (see Hellfire for Diablo). Board games and RPGs have been marketing expansions since at least the early 1970s.

Contents

Summary

The price of an expansion pack is usually much less than that of the original game. As expansion packs consist solely of additional content, most expansion packs require the original game in order to play. Games with many expansions often begin selling the original game with prior expansions, such as The Sims Deluxe Edition (The Sims with The Sims: Livin' Large). These bundles make the game more accessible to new players. When games reach the end of their lifespan, the publisher often releases a 'complete' or 'gold' collection which includes the game and all its subsequent expansions.

Stand-alone expansion packs

Some expansion packs do not require the original game in order to use the new content, as is the case with Blue Shift or Sonic & Knuckles. In some cases, a standalone expansion such as Heroes of Might and Magic III: The Shadow of Death, or Dungeon Siege: Legends of Aranna includes the original game. Standalone expansions are preferred by game retailers since they require less shelf space and are generally easier to move since they don't carry the prerequisite of owning the original game. Often, enhanced games or anthologies released as "Game of the Year edition", "Director's Cut", etc. are examples of standalone expansions. In some standalone packs if you do not have the original or other packs you can't use certain units or races contained in the other games in multiplayer. For example, the final Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War stand alone expansion pack Soulstorm contains the Sisters of Battle and the Dark Eldar, but in order to play as any of the other factions in multiplayer or in skirmish matches you must own the previous titles.

Video game expansion packs

Expansion packs are most commonly released for computer games, but are becoming increasingly prevalent for video game consoles, particularly due to the popularity of online console services such as Xbox Live and the PlayStation Network. The increasing number of multi-platform games has also led to the release of more expansion packs on consoles, especially stand-alone expansion packs (as described above). Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath, for example, requires the original Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars to play on the PC, but Xbox 360 versions of both the original Tiberium Wars and Kane's Wrath are available, neither of which require one another.

Grand Theft Auto: London, 1969 was the first expansion pack released for the PlayStation. The game required the player to insert the London disc, remove it, insert the original Grand Theft Auto disc, remove it, then insert the London disc again in order to play.

Sonic & Knuckles for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis was unusual in that it functioned as both a stand alone cartridge and as an expansion pack for both Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and Sonic the Hedgehog 3.

See also

References


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Category:Expansion pack article)

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

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These games are released as expansions for other games. To play them, you will need to have installed the original version of the game. There are some exceptions where the expansion can be a stand alone.

Pages in category "Expansion pack"

The following 32 pages are in this category, out of 32 total.

A

  • Age of Empires II: The Conquerors
  • Age of Mythology: The Titans
  • Aliens versus Predator 2: Primal Hunt

B

  • Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal
  • Battlefield 1942: Secret Weapons of WWII
  • Battlefield 1942: The Road to Rome

C

  • Command & Conquer: Generals - Zero Hour
  • Command & Conquer: Red Alert 3: Uprising

D

  • Diablo II: Lord of Destruction

G

G cont.

  • Guild Wars: Eye of the North

H

  • Heroes of Might and Magic II: The Price of Loyalty
  • Heroes of Might and Magic III: Armageddon's Blade
  • Heroes of Might and Magic III: The Shadow of Death
  • Heroes of Might and Magic V: Tribes of the East

M

  • MechWarrior 2: Ghost Bear's Legacy

R

  • Rome: Total War: Alexander

S

  • Sid Meier's Civilization III: Conquests
  • Sid Meier's Civilization III: Play the World
  • The Sims 3: World Adventures
  • Star Wars: Empire at War: Forces of Corruption

S cont.

  • StarCraft: Brood War

T

  • Total Annihilation: Battle Tactics
  • Total Annihilation: The Core Contingency

W

  • Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal
  • Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne
  • Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War: Dark Crusade
  • Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War: Soulstorm
  • Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War: Winter Assault
  • World of Warcraft: Cataclysm
  • World of Warcraft: The Burning Crusade
  • World of Warcraft: Wrath of the Lich King

Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010
(Redirected to Expansion article)

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

An expansion (also known as expansion pack) is the term for a software package which is not a complete game in itself but adds supplemental content to an existing game. Alternate titles for expansions are "add-ons" and "mission packs. "Typically an option taken by a developer when they have ideas on how to improve a game that are too drastic to be a free patch, but are still similar enough to the original product that they don't have to release an entirely new title.

Expansions to MMO games are often seen as a dirty financial strategy, since players have already paid an initial box cost in addition to a monthly fee, however there is more at work in MMO games than with normal games. Without an influx of new players, MMO games die off, so companies need to keep fresh content on store shelves. By releasing expansions and subsequent compilations, they can maintain a presence in sale venues.



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This article uses material from the "Expansion" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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