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Lokomotiv Moscow
Lokomotivmoscow.png
Full name Football Club Lokomotiv Moscow
Nickname(s) Loko
Parovoz (Steam Locomotive)
Parovozy (Steam Locomotives)
Krasno-zelyonyye (Red-Greens)
Zheleznodorozhniki (Railroaders)
Founded 12 August 1923
Ground Lokomotiv Stadium, Moscow
(Capacity: 28,800)
Chairman Russia Nikolay Naumov
Head Coach Russia Yuri Semin
League Russian Premier League
2009 4th
Home colours
Away colours

Lokomotiv Moscow (FC Lokomotiv Moskva, Russian: Футбольный клуб "Локомотив" Москва [1]) is a Russian football club based in Moscow. Lokomotiv Moscow won the Russian Premier League two times and the Russian Cup a record of five times.

Lokomotiv won the Russian Premier League in 2002 (ending Spartak Moscow domination) and in 2004, the USSR Cup in 1936 and 1957, and the Russian Cup in 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001 and 2007. The club was the runner-up in 1959, 1995, 1999, 2000 and 2001, and finished third in 1994, 1998, 2005 and 2006. Lokomotiv was the Russian Super Cup holder in 2003 and 2005.

Contents

History

Lokomotiv was originally founded as Club of the October Revolution on 12 August 1923, and it united the strongest football players of several roads of the Moscow railway junction. In 1931, the club was renamed to Kazanka (Moskovskaya-Kazanskaya Zh.D) and in 1936, it was eventually renamed to as it is known today, Lokomotiv. During the Communist rule, Lokomotiv Moscow club was a part of the Lokomotiv Voluntary Sports Society and it was owned by the Soviet Ministry of Transportation through the Russian Railways.

Soviet Era

When the Lokomotiv Voluntary Sports Society was created in 1936, its football team featured the best players of Kazanka, and a number of strong Soviet footballers of that time such as Valentin Granatkin, Nikolay llyin, Alexey Sokolov, Pyotr Terenkov, Mikhail Zhukov, llya Gvozdkov, Ivan Andreev. Lokomotiv debuted in the first ever Soviet football club championship with a game against Dynamo Leningrad on 22 May 1936. In the first two seasonal championships (spring and autumn), Lokomotiv finished fifth and fourth respectively. The first Lokomotiv success arrived shortly as in 1936, the railwaymen rised up to the occasion to beat Dynamo Tbilisi by 2 goals to nil in the Soviet Cup Final, and thus proclaim the first ever Soviet Cup.

The following years were rather succesful as Lokomotiv were consistent in the national championships. However, performances after World War II suffered and actually in the space of five year Lokomotiv were relegated to the Soviet First League twice. In 1951, Lokomotiv came second and eventually won the promotion to the Soviet Top League. This kicked off the second Lokomotiv's resurgence and till the beginning of the sixties, the Lokomotiv competed for the highest trophies. Actually in 1957, Lokomotiv won the cup cup for the second time, and two years later, Lokomotiv won the silver medals of the Soviet League. Eventually the second place was the highest position ever obtained by Lokomotiv in Soviet era.

Another important trademark for Lokomotiv was the authorization of playing friendly matches against foreign opposition. This because up to the late fifties, international sports contacts of the Soviet teams were extremely rare. However, since in 1955 Lokomotiv became an original football ambassador of the Soviet Union abroad, Lokomotiv were allowed to play friendly matches in various parts of the world such as Europe, Asia, Africa and even North America. This resulted to be a great era for Lokomotiv and the squad included some of the finest Russian footballers of all time such as Vladimir Maslachenko, Gennady Zabelin, Eugeny Rogov, Valentin Bubukin, Victor Sokolov, Victor Voroshilov, Igor Zajtsev, Zaur Kaloyev, Yuri Kovalyov, and Vitaly Artemyev. When Lokomotiv’s strongest players abandoned the club, Lokomotiv fell again from grace. A swing between the first and second division followed. This lasted till the end of the 80s.

Post-Soviet Era

In the beginning of 1990s Lokomotiv was considered the "weakest link" among top Moscow clubs. It lacked both results on the pitch and fans support in the stands. However, head coach Yuri Semin and president Valeri Filatov were able to put the club's progress on a right track and thus installing Lokomotiv as the fifth wheel of the Moscow cart. All this because historically Lokomotiv wasn't considered to be a big club as Spartak, CSKA, Dynamo and Torpedo.

Solid performances in domestic league and several memorable campaigns in European Cups made Lokomotiv a superclub by Russian scales and brought back fans and supporters back to the stands. In 2002, a new stadium resembling a traditional, compact English one was built. The arena, still considered as being one of the most, if not the best and comfortable in Eastern Europe gave a huge boost to a club's fan growth rate. Actually nowadays, the average attendance of Lokomotiv home games is one of the highest in Moscow. Eventually in 2009, the average attendance at the stadium was the second highest in Moscow.

Golden Match

In 2002 a "golden match" was needed to decide who will be the champion, as Lokomotiv Moscow and PFC CSKA Moscow both finished with the same amount of points after Gameweek 30. The game was played at Dynamo in front of a sold-out crowd. Lokomotiv took an early lead thanks a low drive from captain Dmitry Loskov, and eventually the goal turned out to be enough for Lokomotiv to claim the first title in the club's history.

Second Title

Two years late, Lokomotiv Moscow won again the Russian Premier League by a single point over city rivals CSKA Moscow. Lokomotiv won the championship by defeating Shinnik Yaroslavl 2-0 in Yaroslavl, a week after CSKA slipped up against city rivals Dynamo Moscow at home.

Post-Semin

In 2005 their head coach for many years, Yuri Semin, left them to coach the Russian national team and was replaced by Vladimir Eshtrekov. During that same year, although leading the league for most of the year, Lokomotiv, under Estrekhov stumbled in the last games and eventually let CSKA to overtake them and claim the title. Ultimately Lokomotiv finishing 3rd. Estrekhov was sacked and Slavoljub Muslin was called in to replace. Eventually this was Loko's first foreign manager in the club's history. After a poor start, Lokomotiv recovered and finished third. Despite a respectable performance, Muslin was sacked. Anatoly Byshovets replaced at the helm and Yury Semin returned to Lokomotiv as a president. This brought little success to Lokomotiv as the season was rather a disappointing one as Lokomotiv finished in the 7th place. The only bright point was the winning of the Cup. These poor performances prompted the Board of Directors to sack both coach Anatoly Byshovets and president Yury Semin. Subsequently Rinat Bilyaletdinov acted as a caretaker coach. This lasted till 6 December 2006 as Lokomotiv brought Rashid Rakhimov from Amkar on a three year contract. However, this resulted to be yet another false move from the board as Lokomotiv were only capable of finishing 7th in 2008 and starting poorly the 2009 season. Unsurprisinly on 28 April 2009 Lokomotiv fired Rakhimov. Long-time serving player Vladimir Maminov was installed as a Caretaker manager. A month later, Lokomotiv appointed fan-favourite Yuri Semin. This brought immediate success to Lokomotiv as after a really poor start, Lokomotiv recovered and finished the season on a high, claiming the 4th place in the process.

Performances in Europe

Lokomotiv reached the Cup Winners' Cup semi-final twice (in 1997/98 and 1998/99). The club also played in the 2nd group stage of the Champions league in 2002/03 season and lost by the away goal in the Champions League last 16 tie against AS Monaco FC in 2004. These were the best achievements of the club in the European cups so far.

Current squad

As of 12 March 2010 as registered with Russian Premier League Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 Brazil GK Guilherme
3 Russia DF Oleg Kuzmin
4 Brazil DF Rodolfo (vice-captain)
5 Croatia MF Tomislav Dujmović
7 Russia MF Dmitri Tarasov
8 Russia MF Denis Glushakov
9 Nigeria FW Peter Odemwingie
11 Russia FW Dmitri Sychev (captain)
13 Brazil MF Wágner
14 Russia MF Igor Smolnikov
15 Ghana MF Haminu Draman
16 Brazil MF Charles
17 Russia DF Dmitri Sennikov
18 Russia MF Vladislav Ignatyev
No. Position Player
19 Mali FW Dramane Traoré
20 Slovenia DF Branko Ilič
21 Russia MF Dmitri Torbinski
22 Russia GK Aleksandr Krivoruchko
23 Montenegro DF Marko Baša
30 Georgia (country) DF Malkhaz Asatiani (vice-captain)
32 Czech Republic GK Marek Čech
44 Russia DF Ruslan Kambolov
45 Russia FW Aleksandr Minchenkov
55 Russia DF Renat Yanbayev
69 Russia DF Sergei Yefimov
81 Russia MF Alan Gatagov
88 Ukraine MF Oleksandr Aliyev
90 Brazil FW Maicon

For recent transfers, see List of Russian football transfers summer 2009 and List of Russian football transfers winter 2009–10.

Players on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
19 Senegal FW Baye Djiby Fall (at Norway Molde)
20 Slovakia DF Ján Ďurica (at Germany Hannover 96)
33 Belarus GK Artem Gomelko (at Belarus Naftan Novopolotsk)
38 Russia MF Denis Voynov (at Russia Lokomotiv-2 Moscow)
No. Position Player
59 Russia FW Semyon Fomin (at Russia Lokomotiv-2 Moscow)
77 Moldova MF Stanislav Ivanov (at Russia Rostov)
Italy GK Ivan Pelizzoli (at Italy AlbinoLeffe)

Technical staff

As of 27 May 2009
Name Role
Russia Yuri Semin Head Coach
UzbekistanRussia Vladimir Maminov Assistant Coach
UzbekistanRussia Oleg Pashinin Fitness Coach
Italy Vincenzo Pincolini Fitness Coach
Russia Zaur Khapov Goalkeeper Coach
TajikistanRussia Igor Cherevchenko Coach
TajikistanRussiaAustria Sergey Mandreko Coach
Russia Sergey Korotkov Team Director
Russia Dmitri Balashov Team Manager
Russia Anatoliy Mashkov Administrator
Russia Alexandr Pozhidaev Administrator
Russia Sergey Grishin Administrator
Russia Saveliy Myshalov Doctor
Georgia (country) Alexander Yardoshvili Doctor
Russia Alexandr Gasov Masseur
Russia Vladimir Tkachenko Massuer
Russia Sergey Semakin Massuer

Youth squad

As of 12 March 2010 as registered with Russian Premier League. Players are eligible to play for the main squad.

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
6 Serbia DF Milan Milanović
27 Russia MF Magomed Ozdoyev
36 Russia DF Mahmadnaim Sharifi
41 Russia MF Ilya Mironov
51 Russia DF Maksim Belyayev
52 Russia GK Yevgeni Bodanov
53 Russia DF Andrei Semyonov
54 Russia GK Yegor Generalov
56 Russia FW Georgi Nurov
59 Russia MF Aleksandr Vasyukov
61 Kyrgyzstan FW Mirlan Murzaev
62 Russia MF Roman Bykov
64 Russia MF Seit-Daut Garakoyev
65 Russia FW Dmitriy Kukharchuk
No. Position Player
68 Russia GK Aleksandr Korshunov
71 Russia DF Aleksei Mamonov
72 Russia FW Soslan Dzhioyev
74 Russia FW Maksim Barsov
75 Russia DF Pavel Novitskiy
78 Russia MF Nikolai Kalinskiy
79 Russia DF Aleksandr Yarkovoy
82 Russia DF Soslan Gatagov
83 Russia MF Aleksei Malkov
84 Russia MF Daniil Lezgintsev
96 Russia FW Dmitri Poloz
98 Russia MF Alan Chochiyev
99 Russia DF Taras Burlak

League positions

Honours

Winners

2002, 2004
1996, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2007
2003, 2005
1936, 1957
2005

Other Notable Achievements

Semi-finalist 1998, 1999

Stadium

Lokomotiv play their home games at Lokomotiv Stadium. It's total seating capacity is 28,800 seats, all covered. The stadium was opened in 2002.

  • Highest Attendance Recorded: 32,333 people
  • Address: 107553, Moscow, Bolshaya Cherkizovskaya, 125
  • Telephone: +7 (495) 161-4283
  • Fax = +7 (495) 161-9977

League and Cup history

Soviet Union Soviet Union
Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe Notes
1936 1st 5 6 2 0 4 7 11 10 Spring tournament
1936 1st 4 7 4 0 3 18 14 15 Winner Autumn tournament
1937 1st 6 16 5 5 6 18 20 31 Semi-final
1938 1st 8 25 12 6 7 44 37 30 Round of 64
1939 1st 5 26 12 6 8 42 39 30 Round of 16
1940 1st 6 24 10 5 9 36 52 25
1944 Round of 16
1945 1st 12 22 1 3 18 14 54 5 Round of 32 Relegated
1946 2nd 7
1947 2nd 1 Qual. round Promoted
1948 1st 7 26 10 4 12 38 64 24 Round of 16
1949 1st 11 34 11 8 15 59 56 30 Round of 64
1950 1st 15 36 11 8 17 41 73 30 Quarter-final Relegated
1951 2nd 3 Round of 64 Promoted
1952 1st 9 13 5 2 6 19 21 12 Round of 16
1953 1st 6 20 6 6 8 21 28 18 Semi-final
1954 1st 10 24 7 7 10 21 23 21 Round of 16
1955 1st 5 22 9 7 6 32 27 25 Semi-final
1956 1st 10 22 5 8 9 38 28 18
1957 1st 4 22 12 4 6 39 27 28 Winner
1958 1st 5 22 9 6 7 48 34 24 Semi-final
1959 1st 2 22 12 5 5 42 25 29
1960 1st 5 30 14 6 10 45 46 34 Round of 32
1961 1st 5 30 13 12 5 58 42 38 Quarter-final
1962 1st 13 30 8 9 13 38 45 27 Round of 32
1963 1st 17 38 5 19 14 37 54 29 Round of 32 Relegated
1964 2nd 1 40 19 15 6 45 30 53 Round of 32 Promoted
1965 1st 15 32 8 8 16 37 48 24 Round of 16
1966 1st 17 36 11 5 20 34 49 27 Round of 32
1967 1st 17 36 7 14 15 33 37 28 Quarter-final
1968 1st 10 38 10 17 11 35 39 37 Round of 32
1969 1st 18 34 8 9 17 33 47 25 Round of 32 Relegated
1970 2nd 4 42 20 10 12 53 39 50 Round of 32
1971 2nd 2 42 25 12 5 81 33 62 Round of 32 Promoted
1972 1st 15 30 6 9 15 29 48 21 Quarter-final Relegated
1973 2nd 3 38 20 8 10 47 32 46 Round of 32
1974 2nd 1 38 23 7 8 73 33 53 Round of 32 Promoted
1975 1st 11 30 7 12 11 28 33 26 Quarter-final
1976 1st 15 15 3 3 9 17 23 9 Spring tournament
1976 1st 8 15 6 3 6 13 13 15 Round of 16 Autumn tournament
1977 1st 6 30 9 14 7 27 25 32 Round of 32
1978 1st 15 30 7 9 14 26 40 22 Semi-final
1979 1st 12 34 8 12 14 44 57 24 Group stage
1980 1st 18 34 8 9 17 34 44 25 Group stage Relegated
1981 2nd 3 46 21 15 10 65 41 54 Round of 16
1982 2nd 4 42 21 13 8 63 32 54 Group stage
1983 2nd 15 42 13 13 16 51 47 38 Round of 32
1984 2nd 6 42 17 13 12 44 37 46 Round of 64
1985 2nd 6 42 16 11 15 52 51 43 Round of 64
1986 2nd 6 46 21 11 14 63 48 53 Round of 32
1987 2nd 2 42 23 13 6 59 26 58 Round of 128 Promoted
1988 1st 7 30 10 12 8 35 29 30 Round of 32
1989 1st 15 30 7 9 14 20 32 23 Round of 32 Relegated
1990 2nd 4 38 19 9 10 52 34 47 Runner up Promoted
1991 1st 16 30 5 8 17 18 47 18 Semi-final
1992 Semi-final
Russia Russia
Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe Notes Top Scorer Head Coach
1992 1st 4 26 13 7 6 34 25 33 Russia Yuri Semin
1993 1st 5 34 14 11 9 45 29 39 Round of 16 Russia Yuri Semin
1994 1st 3 30 12 12 6 49 28 36 Quarter-final UC Round of 64 Russia Yuri Semin
1995 1st 2 30 20 5 5 52 23 55 Quarter-final Russia Yuri Semin
1996 1st 6 34 15 10 9 46 31 55 Winner UC Round of 64 Russia Yuri Semin
1997 1st 5 34 15 9 10 47 37 54 Winner CWC Round of 16 Russia Yuri Semin
1998 1st 3 30 16 7 7 45 28 55 Runner-Up CWC Semi-final Russia Yuri Semin
1999 1st 2 30 20 5 5 62 30 65 Round of 32 CWC Semi-final Russia Loskov - 14 Russia Yuri Semin
2000 1st 2 30 18 8 4 50 20 62 Winner UC Round of 64 Russia Loskov - 15 Russia Yuri Semin
2001 1st 2 30 16 8 6 53 24 56 Winner UC Round of 32 Nigeria Obiorah - 14 Russia Yuri Semin
2002 1st 1 31 20 9 2 47 14 69 Round of 32 UC Round of 32 RussiaLoskov/RussiaEvseev/RussiaPimenov - 7 Russia Yuri Semin
2003 1st 4 30 15 7 8 54 33 52 Round of 16 ECL 2nd Group Stage Russia Loskov - 14 Russia Yuri Semin
2004 1st 1 30 18 7 5 44 19 61 Quarter-final ECL Round of 16 Russia Sychev - 15 Russia Yuri Semin
2005 1st 3 30 14 14 2 41 18 56 Round of 32 Russia Bilyaletdinov - 8 Russia Yuri Semin, Russia Vladimir Eshtrekov
2006 1st 3 30 15 8 7 47 34 53 Quarter-final UC Round of 32 Russia Loskov - 13 Serbia Slavoljub Muslin, Russia Oleg Dolmatov
2007 1st 7 30 11 8 11 39 42 41 Winner UC 1st Round Russia Sychev - 11 Russia Anatoliy Byshovets
2008 1st 7 30 13 8 9 37 32 47 Round of 32 UC Group Stage Nigeria Odemwingie - 10 Russia Rashid Rakhimov
2009 1st 4 30 15 9 6 43 30 54 Round of 32 Russia Sychev - 12 TajikistanRussia Rashid Rakhimov, UzbekistanRussia Vladimir Maminov, Russia Yuri Semin

Notable players

Had international caps for their respective countries. Players whose name is listed in bold represented their countries while playing for Lokomotiv.

USSR/Russia
Former USSR countries
Europe
Central America
Africa

Club records

See also

References

External links








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