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Zenit Saint Petersburg
Zenitspb.png
Full name Football Club Zenit Saint Petersburg
Nickname(s) Sine-belo-golubyye
("Blue-White-Sky Blues")
anti-aircraft gunners
Founded 1925
Ground Petrovsky Stadium,
Saint Petersburg
(Capacity: 21,570)
Owner Russia Gazprom
Chairman Russia Aleksandr Dyukov
Head Coach Italy Luciano Spalletti
League Russian Premier League
2009 Russian Premier League, 3rd
Home colours
Away colours
Third colours
Current season

Football Club Zenit Saint Petersburg (Russian: ФК «Зeнит» Санкт-Петербург) is a Russian football club from the city of Saint Petersburg. Founded in 1925 (or in 1914, according to some Russian sources), the club plays in the Russian Premier League and currently is one of the strongest in the country. Zenit were the 2007 champions of the Russian Premier League and the winners of both the 2008 UEFA Cup and the 2008 UEFA Super Cup.

Contents

History

Before Zenit

Zenit's history is tightly connected with the turbulent political history of Saint PetersburgPetrogradLeningrad, Russia.

In 1897, the first football match in Russia was held in Saint Petersburg on Vasilyevsky Ostrov, an unofficial game between the local English team "Ostrov" and the local Russian team "Petrograd" which the English team won 6–0. The players of those local teams were amateurs and loosely associated with each other. At the same time several formal football clubs were founded in Saint Petersburg, mainly around large industrial companies. However, players' membership was unofficial and very loose, sometimes allowing the same players to play for several different teams during the same season.

Formation of Zenit

The original team Zenit stemmed from several football teams, which changed names and owners many times during the Soviet era after the Revolution of 1917. Powerful political forces manipulated the careers of individual players as well as the fate of the whole team. The club was renamed several times, and its owners and leaders were under political pressure for many decades.

The origins of Zenit Saint Petersburg date back to the beginning of the 20th century, to several predecessor teams in Saint Petersburg, which were playing locally. The oldest documented predecessor of "Zenit" was team "Murzinka" founded in 1914, which played exactly on the same "Obukhovsky" stadium from 1914 until 1924, when the team became to be called "Bolshevik" (the new name for "Obukhovsky" industry and its stadium). The team and stadium survived the drama of World War I, the Bolshevik revolution of 1917, and the Russian Civil War of 1918–1922.

In 1925, another predecessor team of Zenit was formed of workers from the Leningrad Metal Plant LMZ, it was called "Stalinets" in the 1930s. Historians had documented that both teams predecessors of "Zenit" were playing independently until their official merger in the end of 1939. "Stalinets" was not the same team, named "Zenit" that took part in the 1938 USSR championship.

The current name of FC "Zenit" was registered in 1936 as Bolshevik became part of the Zenit sports society and was renamed to FC Zenit, three years before "Stalinets" was merged with it. In 1939, during the rule of Joseph Stalin, FC Zenit was ordered to take in members of the metallurgical workers' team, called Stalinets Leningrad (translated as "Stalinist" - note the play of words as stal also means "steel" in Russian). At that time the Leningrad Metal Plant (LMZ) became part of the military industry and its sports teams, players and managers were transferred to the Zenit sports society. After the end of the 1939 season, Stalinets was merged with Zenit which played in the second division.

Zenit in the Soviet League

Zenit Leningrad logo

FC Zenit won their first honours in 1944, claiming the war-time USSR Cup after defeating CSKA in the well-attended final. The club was always adored in Leningrad but wasn't able to make much of an impact in the Soviet League. In 1967, Zenit finished last but were saved from relegation because the powers that were decided it wouldn't be prudent to relegate a Leningrad team during the 50th anniversary of the October Revolution, which occurred in the city.

Composer Dmitry Shostakovich and film star Kirill Lavrov were well-known as ardent supporters of Zenit, a passion that is reflected in their attendance of many games, personal correspondence as well as official reports. In short, by the wish of the proletariat as all power was in hands of people the club stayed in the League.

FC Zenit won the bronze medal in 1980, achieved Soviet Cup Final 1984 and, finally, won the Soviet League title in 1984. Next year, Zenit beat Soviet Cup holder in Soviet Super Cup (also named as Season Cup).

Zenit in the Russian League

Zenit's old logo

The LOMO optical plant took up the ownership of the team after the war. In 1990 FC Zenit was re-registered as the independent city-owned professional club.

After being relegated in the first year of the Russian League (1992), Zenit returned to the top flight in 1996 and has been decent since. They claimed the 1999 Russian Cup, finished third in the League in 2001, made the Cup final in 2002, became the runners-up in the Premier League, and won the Russian Premier League Cup in 2003.

In December 2005, Gazprom took a controlling stake in the club. The deal was announced by Valentina Matviyenko, the Saint Petersburg governor. Gazprom, who bought the majority of the club and invested over a hundred million dollars into buying new players and building a new stadium, the Zenit Stadium, with a capacity of over 60,000 people.

The home ground of Zenit is now at Petrovsky Stadium in Saint Petersburg. In 2007, the club's former home base at the Kirov Stadium was demolished, to be replaced with a new stadium for Zenit.

Zenit's home ground at Petrovsky stadium in Saint Petersburg, Russia

The new football stadium in Saint Petersburg is currently under construction[1], as of 2007. Once completed in 2011,[2] it will host the home matches of Zenit Saint Petersburg. The stadium will have a capacity of 62,000 people.[2] The name of the future stadium would be Gazprom Arena.

Although Zenit reached the quarterfinal of the UEFA Cup in 2006, a mediocre start to the league season led to the summer replacement of coach Vlastimil Petržela. Since July 2006, Zenit has been under the experienced and respected Dick Advocaat[3] Advocaat works together with his Assistant Manager, former Netherlands National Youth Team coach, Cornelius Pot.

Zenit won the 2007 Russian Premier League, their best league achievement since winning the USSR Championship in 1984. That allowed them to compete in the group stage of the Champions League 2008–09. In 2008 Zenit won the Russian Super Cup and reached the quarter-final of the UEFA Cup for the second time in their history. In the first leg of the quarter final away against Bayer Leverkusen from Germany, the team achieved a 4–1 victory. They qualified for the semi-finals of the competition for the first time in their history, despite a 1–0 home loss to Bayer Leverkusen in the second leg, and were drawn to play further German opposition in the semi-final, Bayern Munich, considered the top team remaining.

A battling performance in the first leg of the semi-final earned Zenit a 1–1 draw away against Bayern Munich. In the second leg at home, Zenit won 4–0, defeating Bayern 5–1 on aggregate and going through to the UEFA Cup final for the first time in the club's history, where they met the Scottish team Rangers at the City of Manchester Stadium, Manchester on 14 May. Zenit won 2–0, with goals from Igor Denisov in the 72nd minute and Konstantin Zyryanov in stoppage time, to lift the club's first ever UEFA Cup. Andrei Arshavin was named man of the match.[4] Zenit's Pavel Pogrebnyak became the top scorer of that year's tournament.[5]

On 29 August 2008 at the Stade Louis II in Monaco, Zenit defeated Manchester United 2–1 in the 2008 UEFA Super Cup, becoming the first Russian side to win the trophy. Pavel Pogrebnyak scored the first goal and Danny scored the second. Danny was named for man of the match in his debut for Zenit.

In the UEFA Champions League 2008–09 group stage Zenit was grouped with Real Madrid, Juventus, and BATE in Group H, which by some was marked as the group of death. Unfortunately the team finished in third place in Group H, behind Juventus and Real Madrid and was unable to progress to the knockout phase of the competition. However this position was good enough to earn the club a place in the 2008–09 UEFA Cup last 32 where the team faced Stuttgart of Germany for a place in the last 16 of the competition. This allowed the club a shot to defend the trophy that they won the previous season in Manchester. However after defeating Stuttgart on away goals, they went on to lose 2–1 over two legs against Udinese.

Achievements

League and Cup history

Soviet Union Soviet Union
Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe
1936 2nd 3 6 9 9 13
1936 2nd 6 7 6 13 12 Round of 16
1937 2nd 4 12 22 18 25 Round of 128
1938 1st 14 25 7 10 8 38 57 24 Round of 16
1939 1st 11 26 7 7 12 30 46 21 Runner-up
1940 1st 10 24 6 6 12 37 42 18
1944 Winner
1945 1st 6 8 7 7 35 31 23 Semi-final
1946 1st 9 22 5 5 12 22 45 15 Round of 16
1947 1st 6 24 10 2 12 35 49 22 Quarter-final
1948 1st 13 26 4 9 13 29 48 17 Round of 16
1949 1st 5 34 17 8 9 48 48 42 Quarter-final
1950 1st 6 36 19 5 12 70 59 43 Quarter-final
1951 1st 7 28 10 8 10 36 40 28 Round of 16
1952 1st 7 13 6 2 5 20 21 14 Quarter-final
1953 1st 5 20 11 1 8 25 21 23 Round of 16
1954 1st 7 24 8 7 9 27 26 23 Semi-final
1955 1st 8 22 5 8 9 23 36 18 Round of 16
1956 1st 9 22 4 11 7 27 43 19
1957 1st 10 22 4 7 11 23 41 15 Round of 16
1958 1st 4 22 9 8 5 41 32 26 Round of 16
1959 1st 8 22 8 4 10 29 38 20
1960 1st 15 30 14 5 11 47 37 33 Round of 32
1961 1st 13 32 12 8 12 50 52 32 Semi-final
1962 1st 11 32 11 7 14 53 42 29 Round of 32
1963 1st 6 38 14 17 7 45 32 45 Round of 32
1964 1st 11 32 9 9 14 30 35 27 Round of 16
1965 1st 9 32 10 12 10 32 32 32 Round of 32
1966 1st 16 36 10 8 18 35 54 28 Round of 16
1967 1st 19 36 6 9 21 28 63 21 Round of 32
1968 1st 11 38 10 14 14 35 49 34 Round of 32
1969 1st 9 26 6 9 11 21 34 21 Round of 16
1970 1st 14 32 10 7 15 30 40 27 Quarter-final
1971 1st 13 30 8 10 12 29 32 26 Quarter-final
1972 1st 7 30 11 11 8 44 30 33 Quarter-final
1973 1st 11 30 9 12 9 33 35 21 Round of 16
1974 1st 7 30 8 15 7 36 41 31 Round of 16
1975 1st 14 30 7 10 13 27 42 24 Round of 16
1976 1st 13 15 4 5 6 14 15 13
1976 1st 5 15 6 4 5 22 16 16 Round of 16
1977 1st 10 30 8 12 10 34 33 28 Semi-final
1978 1st 10 30 9 8 13 31 46 26 Quarter-final
1979 1st 10 34 11 9 14 41 45 30 Group stage
1980 1st 3 34 16 10 8 51 42 42 Group Stage
1981 1st 15 34 9 10 15 33 43 28 Round of 16
1982 1st 7 34 12 9 13 44 41 33 Group stage UC First round
1983 1st 4 34 15 11 8 42 32 40 Semi-final
1984 1st 1 34 19 9 6 60 32 47 Runner-up
1985 1st 6 34 14 7 13 48 38 35 Semi-final
1986 1st 4 30 12 9 9 44 36 33 Semi-final ECC Second round
1987 1st 14 30 7 10 13 25 37 24 Round of 16
1988 1st 6 30 11 9 10 35 34 31 Round of 16 UC First round
1989 1st 16 30 5 9 16 24 48 19 Round of 16
1990 2nd 18 38 8 14 16 35 41 30 Round of 32 UC Second round
1991 2nd 18 42 11 14 17 44 50 36 Round of 32

Russia Russia

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Cup Europe Top Scorer
(League)
Head Coach
1992 1st 16 30 10 8 12 39 45 28 Russia Kulik - 13 Russia Melnikov
1993 2nd,
"Centre"
2 38 25 8 5 87 33 58 Round of 32 Russia Kulik - 36 Russia Melnikov
1994 2nd 13 42 14 12 16 44 49 40 Round of 64 Russia Kulik - 9 Russia Melnikov
1995 3 42 24 5 13 65 42 77 Round of 32 Russia Kulik - 19 Russia Sadyrin
1996 1st 10 34 13 4 17 32 37 43 Round of 32 Russia Kulik - 11 Russia Sadyrin
1997 8 34 13 10 11 28 29 49 Semifinal Ukraine Gorshkov - 5 Russia Byshovets
1998 5 30 12 11 7 42 25 47 Round of 16 Russia Panov - 8
Ukraine Maksimyuk - 8
Russia Byshovets
Russia Davydov
1999 8 30 9 12 9 36 34 39 Winner Ukraine Popovich - 7 Russia Davydov
2000 7 30 13 8 9 38 26 47 Round of 32 UC
IC
1st Round
Runner-Up
Ukraine Popovich - 10 Russia Davydov
Russia Morozov
2001 3 30 16 8 6 52 35 56 Round of 32 Ukraine Popovich - 7 Russia Morozov
2002 10 30 8 9 13 36 42 33 Runner-Up Russia Kerzhakov - 14 Russia Morozov
Russia Biryukov
Russia Rappoport
2003 2 30 16 8 6 48 32 56 Round of 16 UC 1st Round Russia Kerzhakov - 13 Czech Republic Petržela
2004 4 30 17 5 8 55 37 56 Round of 16 Russia Kerzhakov - 18 Czech Republic Petržela
2005 6 30 13 10 7 45 26 49 Semifinals UC Group Stage Russia Arshavin - 9 Czech Republic Petržela
2006 4 30 13 11 6 42 30 50 Semifinals UC Quarterfinals Russia Arshavin - 7 Czech Republic Petržela
Czech Republic Borovička
Netherlands Advocaat
2007 1 30 18 7 5 53 32 61 Quarterfinals Russia Pogrebnyak - 11 Netherlands Advocaat
2008 5 30 12 12 6 59 37 48 Quarterfinals UC Winner Turkey Tekke - 8 Netherlands Advocaat
2009 3 30 15 9 6 48 27 54 Round of 32 UCL
UC
Group Stage
Round of 16
Turkey Tekke - 8 Netherlands Advocaat
Russia Davydov
2010 TBD EL 1st Round TBD Italy Spalletti

League results

Current squad

As of 12 March 2010. According to Official Russian Premier League site

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
2 Russia DF Aleksandr Anyukov (captain)
4 Croatia DF Ivica Križanac
5 Portugal DF Fernando Meira
6 Belgium DF Nicolas Lombaerts
7 Czech Republic DF Radek Šírl
8 Serbia FW Danko Lazović
10 Portugal MF Danny
11 Russia FW Aleksandr Kerzhakov
14 Slovakia DF Tomáš Hubočan
15 Russia MF Roman Shirokov
16 Russia GK Vyacheslav Malafeev
No. Position Player
17 Italy MF Alessandro Rosina
18 Russia MF Konstantin Zyryanov
20 Russia MF Viktor Fayzulin
22 Russia GK Dmitri Borodin
23 Hungary MF Szabolcs Huszti
27 Russia MF Igor Denisov (vice-captain)
28 Denmark DF Michael Lumb
30 Belarus GK Yuri Zhevnov
34 Russia MF Vladimir Bystrov
99 Russia FW Maksim Kanunnikov

Squad number 12 is reserved for Zenit's supporters.

For recent transfers, see List of Russian football transfers summer 2009 and List of Russian football transfers winter 2009–10.

Players out on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
19 Belarus FW Sergei Kornilenko (at Tom Tomsk until August 2010)
29 France DF Sébastien Puygrenier (at Monaco until July 2010)
41 Russia GK Mikhail Kerzhakov (at Alania Vladikavkaz until December 2010)
87 United States FW Yevgeni Starikov (at Tom Tomsk until December 2010)

U-21 squad

As of 12 March 2010. According to Russian Premier League official site
Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
35 Russia MF Anton Sosnin
36 Russia FW Stanislav Matyash
37 Russia DF Aleksandr Khokhlov
47 Russia DF Basel Abdulfattakh
48 Russia DF Aslan Dudiyev
50 Russia DF Igor Cheminava
55 Russia DF Sergei Kostin
57 Russia MF Aleksei Ionov
63 Russia DF Denis Terentyev
64 Russia DF Ilya Lebedev
66 Russia DF Yuri Ponomarenko
69 Russia MF Yevgeni Bashkirov
70 Russia MF Vyacheslav Sushkin
73 Russia FW Stanislav Murikhin
74 Russia DF Vladimir Malyshev
75 Russia MF Ilya Sagdatullin
No. Position Player
77 Russia MF Aleksandr Petrov
78 Russia FW Vladislav Yefimov
80 Russia MF Maksim Batov
81 Russia GK Aleksandr Glinskikh
83 Russia DF Andrei Vasilyev
87 Russia MF Aleksei Kayukov
88 Russia DF Dmitri Telegin
90 Russia GK Aleksei Dugnist
91 Russia GK Andrei Zaytsev
92 Russia MF Nikita Bocharov
93 Russia FW Aleksei Panfilov
95 Russia FW Pavel Shuvalov
96 Russia MF Roland Gigolaev
97 Russia FW Vladislav Sirotov
98 Russia MF Sergei Petrov

Board

As of 20 February 2010
Name Role
Russia Aleksandr Dyukov President
Russia Maxim Mitrofanov General Director
Russia Igor Korneev Sport Director
Russia Dmitri Mankin Vice-General Director (Commercial Director)
Russia Ilya Gerkus Vice-General Director
Russia Rosteslav Leontiev Vice-General Director
Russia Zhanna Dembo Vice-General Director
Russia Yury A.Fedotov Vice-General Director (Security)

Coaching Staff

1-st Team

As of 20 February 2010
Name Role
Italy Luciano Spalletti Head Coach
Italy Daniele Baldini Assistant Coach
Italy Marco Domenichini Assistant Coach
Italy Alberto Bartali Fitness Coach
Russia Igor Simutenkov Coach
Russia Nikolai Vorobyov Coach
Russia Mikhail Biryukov Goalkeeper Coach
Russia Vladislav Radimov Team Director
Russia Yuri Gusakov Administrator
Russia Sergey Pukhov Chief Doctor
Russia Mikhail Grishin Doctor
Russia Valeri Redkoborodov Doctor-Masseur
Russia Alexander Ryazancev Masseur
Russia Sergey Colesnikov Masseur
Russia Alexey Andreev Video Operator

U-21 Team

As of 20 February 2010
Name Role
Russia Anatoli Davydov Head Coach
Russia Nikolay Larionov Coach
Ukraine Olexandr Gorshkov Coach
Russia Yuri Okroshidze Goalkeeper Coach
Russia Sergey Sigaev Doctor
Russia Andrey Tsvetkov Doctor-Masseur
Russia Viktor Kulakov Masseur
Russia Alexandr Savonenko Video Operator

Reserve squad

Zenit's reserve squad played professionally as Football Club Zenit-2 St. Petersburg (Russian Second League in 1993, Russian Second Division in 1998–2000) and FC Zenit-d St. Petersburg (Russian Third League in 1994–1997). Another team that was founded as Football Club Lokomotiv-Zenit-2 St. Petersburg played as Football Club Zenit-2 St. Petersburg in the Russian Second Division from 2001 to 2008. By 2008 there was no relation between that team and FC Zenit. Another farm club called Football Club Smena-Zenit St. Petersburg debuted in the Russian Second Division in 2009, taking the spot of the former FC Zenit-2.

Head Coaches

Name Years
Soviet Union Pyotr Filippov 1936-1937, 1940
Soviet Union Mikhail Yudenich 1938-1939
Soviet Union Konstantin Egorov 1938-1939
Soviet Union Konstantin Lemeshev 1941-1945, 1948-1950
Soviet Union Mikhail Butusov 1946
Soviet Union Ivan Talanov 1946-1948
Soviet Union Georgiy Lasin 1950-1951
Soviet Union Vladimir Lemeshev 1952-1954
Soviet Union Nikolay Lyukshinov 1954-1955
Soviet Union Arkadiy Alov 1956-1957, 1967
Soviet Union Georgiy Zharkov 1957-1960
Soviet Union Gennadiy Bondarenko 1960
Soviet Union Evgeniy Eliseev 1961-1964
Soviet Union Valentin Fedorov 1964-1966
Soviet Union Artem Falyan 1968-1970
Soviet Union Yevgeniy Goryanskiy 1970-1972
Soviet Union German Zonin 1973-1977
Soviet Union Yuri Morozov 1977-1982, 1991, 2000-2002
Soviet Union Pavel Sadyrin 1983-1987, 1995-1996
Soviet Union Vladimir Golubev 1987, 1989
Soviet Union Stanislav Zavidonov 1988-1989
Soviet Union Anatoliy Kon'kov 1990
Soviet Union Vyacheslav Bulavin 1990
Russia Vyacheslav Melnikov 1992-1994
Russia Anatoliy Byshovets 1997-1998
Russia Anatoli Davydov 1998-2000, 2009
Russia Mikhail Biryukov 2002
Russia Boris Rappoport 2002
Czech Republic Vlastimil Petržela 2003-2006
Netherlands Dick Advocaat 2006-2009
Italy Luciano Spalletti 2009-...

Notable players

Had international caps for their respective countries. Players whose name is listed in bold represented their countries while playing for Zenit.

USSR/Russia
Former USSR countries
Europe
South and Central America
Asia

References

External links

Official websites
Official merchandise
General fan sites

Template:Redir

Template:Football club infobox

FC Zenit Saint Petersburg (Russian: ФК «Зeнит» Санкт-Петербург) is a Russian football club from Saint Petersburg. Founded in 1925 (or in 1914 according to some Russian sources), the club plays in the Russian Premier League and currently is the richest in the country, due to the ownership of the club by Gazprom.[1] Zenit are the 2007 champions of the Russian Premier League, the holders of the 2008 UEFA Cup and of the 2008 UEFA Super Cup after beating Manchester United 2-1 in Monaco.

Contents

History

Before Zenit

Zenit's history is tightly connected with the turbulent political history of Saint Petersburg - Petrograd - Leningrad, Russia.

In 1897 the first football match in Russia was held in Saint Petersburg on Vasilyevsky Ostrov, an unofficial game between the local English team "Ostrov" and the local Russian team "Petrograd" which the English team won 6 : 0. The players of those local teams were amateurs and loosely associated with each other. At the same time several formal football clubs were founded in Saint Petersburg, mainly around large industrial companies. However, players' membership was unofficial and very loose, sometimes allowing the same players to play for several different teams during the same season.

Formation of Zenit

The original team Zenit stemmed from several football teams, which changed names and owners many times during the Soviet era after the Revolution of 1917. Powerful political forces manipulated the careers of individual players as well as the fate of the whole team. The club was renamed several times, and its owners and leaders were under political pressure for many decades.

The origins of Zenit Saint Petersburg date back to the beginning of the 20th century, to several predecessor teams in Saint Petersburg, which were playing locally. The oldest documented predecessor of "Zenit" was team "Murzinka" founded in 1914, which played exactly on the same "Obukhovsky" stadium from 1914 until 1924, when the team became called "Bolshevik" (the new name for "Obukhovsky" industry and its stadium). The team and stadium survived the drama of World War I, the Bolshevik revolution of 1917, and the Russian Civil War of 1918-1922.

In 1925, another predecessor team of Zenit was formed of workers from the Leningrad Metal Plant LMZ, it was called "Stalinets" in the 1930s. Historians had documented that both teams predecessors of "Zenit" were playing independently until their official merger in the end of 1939. "Stalinets" was not the same team, named "Zenit" that took part in the 1938 USSR championship.

The current name of FC "Zenit" was registered in 1936 as Bolshevik became part of the Zenit sports society and was renamed to FC Zenit, three years before "Stalinets" was merged with it. In 1939, during the rule of Joseph Stalin, FC Zenit was ordered to take in members of the metallurgical workers' team, called Stalinets Leningrad (translated as "Stalinist" - though stalin also means "steel" in Russian). At that time the Leningrad Metal Plant (LMZ) became part of the military industry and its sports teams, players and managers were transferred to the Zenit sports society. After the end of the 1939 season, Stalinets was merged with Zenit which played in the second division.

Zenit in the Soviet League

FC Zenit won their first honours in 1944, claiming the war-time USSR Cup after defeating CSKA in the well-attended final. The club was always adored in Leningrad but wasn't able to make much of an impact in the Soviet League. In 1967, Zenit finished last but were saved from relegation because the powers that were decided it wouldn't be prudent to relegate a Leningrad team during the 50th anniversary of the October Revolution, which occurred in the city.

Composer Dmitry Shostakovich, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and film star Kirill Lavrov were well-known as ardent supporters of Zenit, a passion that is reflected in their attendance of many games, personal correspondence as well as official reports.

FC Zenit won the bronze medal in 1980, achieved Soviet Cup Final 1984 and, finally, won the Soviet League title in 1984. Next year, Zenit beat Soviet Cup holder in Soviet Super Cup (also named as Season Cup).

Zenit in the Russian League

The LOMO optical plant took up the ownership of the team after the war. In 1990 FC Zenit was re-registered as the independent city-owned professional club.

After being relegated in the first year of the Russian League (1992), Zenit returned to the top flight in 1996 and has been decent since. They claimed the 1999 Russian Cup, finished third in the League in 2001, made the Cup final in 2002, became the runners-up in the Premier League and won the Russian Premier League Cup in 2003.

In December 2005 Gazprom took a controlling stake in the club. The deal was announced by Valentina Matviyenko, the Saint Petersburg governor. Gazprom, who bought the majority of the club and invested over a hundred million dollars into buying new players and building a new stadium, the Zenit Stadium, with a capacity of over 60,000 people.

The home ground of FC Zenit is now at Petrovsky Stadium in Saint Petersburg. In 2007, the club's former home base at the Kirov Stadium was demolished, to be replaced with a new stadium for FC Zenit.

, Russia]] The new football stadium in St. Petersburg, Russia is currently under construction[2], as of 2007. Once completed in December 2008,[3] it will host the home matches of FC Zenit Saint Petersburg. The stadium will have a capacity of 62,000 people.[3] The name of the future stadium would be Gazprom Arena.

Although Zenit reached the quarterfinal of the UEFA Cup in 2006, a mediocre start to the league season led to the summer replacement of coach Vlastimil Petržela. Since July 2006, Zenit has been under the experienced and respected Dick Advocaat[1] Advocaat works together with his Assistant Manager, former Netherlands National Youth Team coach, Cornelius Pot.

Zenit won the 2007 Russian Premier League, their best league achievement since winning the USSR Championship in 1984. That allowed them to compete in the group stage of the Champions League 2008-09. In 2008 Zenit won the Russian Super Cup and reached the quarter-final of the UEFA Cup for the second time in their history. In the first leg of the quarter final away against Bayer Leverkusen from Germany, the team achieved a 4-1 victory. They qualified for the semi-finals of the competition for the first time in their history despite a 0-1 home loss to Bayer in the second leg, and were drawn to play further German opposition in the semi-final, Bayern Munich, considered the top team remaining.

A battling performance in the first leg of the semi-final earned Zenit a 1-1 draw away against Bayern Munich. In the second leg at home, Zenit won 4-0, defeating Bayern Munich 5-1 on aggregate and going through to the UEFA Cup final for the first time in the club's history, where they met the Scottish team Rangers at the City of Manchester Stadium, Manchester on 14 May. Zenit won Glasgow Rangers F.C. 2-0, with goals from Igor Denisov in the 72nd minute and Konstantin Zyryanov in stoppage time, to lift the club's first ever UEFA Cup. Andrei Arshavin was named man of the match.[4] Zenit's Pavel Pogrebnyak became the top scorer of that years tournament.[5]

On 29 August 2008 at Stade Louis II,Monaco, Zenit defeated Manchester United F.C. in the 2008 UEFA Super Cup with a result of 2-1. Pavel Pogrebnyak scored the first goal and Danny Alves scored the second. Danny was named for Man of the Match in his debut for Zenit. For the first time in history a Russian club won this European competition.

In the UEFA Champions League 2008–09 group stage Zenit was grouped with Real Madrid, Juventus, and BATE in Group H, which by some was marked as the group of death. Unfortunately the team finished in 3rd place in group H, behind Juventus and Real Madrid and were unable to progress to the knockout phase of the competition. Andrei Arshavin was also suspended and could not play in Arsenal's cup tie versus Roma. However this position was good enough to earn the club a place in the 2008/09 UEFA Cup last 32 where the team will face the German club VFB Stuttgart for a place in the last 16 of the competition. This allowed the club to defend the trophy that they won the previous season in Manchester however after defeating Stuttgart on away goals, they went on to lose 2-1 over two legs against Udinese.

Achievements

  • UEFA Cup: 1
    • 2007-08

League and Cup history

Soviet Union
Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe
1936 2nd 3 6 9 9 13
1936 2nd 6 7 6 13 12 Round of 16
1937 2nd 4 12 22 18 25 Round of 128
1938 1st 14 25 7 10 8 38 57 24 Round of 16
1939 1st 11 26 7 7 12 30 46 21 Runner-up
1940 1st 10 24 6 6 12 37 42 18
1944 Winner
1945 1st 6 8 7 7 35 31 23 Semi-final
1946 1st 9 22 5 5 12 22 45 15 Round of 16
1947 1st 6 24 10 2 12 35 49 22 Quarter-final
1948 1st 13 26 4 9 13 29 48 17 Round of 16
1949 1st 5 34 17 8 9 48 48 42 Quarter-final
1950 1st 6 36 19 5 12 70 59 43 Quarter-final
1951 1st 7 28 10 8 10 36 40 28 Round of 16
1952 1st 7 13 6 2 5 20 21 14 Quarter-final
1953 1st 5 20 11 1 8 25 21 23 Round of 16
1954 1st 7 24 8 7 9 27 26 23 Semi-final
1955 1st 8 22 5 8 9 23 36 18 Round of 16
1956 1st 9 22 4 11 7 27 43 19
1957 1st 10 22 4 7 11 23 41 15 Round of 16
1958 1st 4 22 9 8 5 41 32 26 Round of 16
1959 1st 8 22 8 4 10 29 38 20
1960 1st 15 30 14 5 11 47 37 33 Round of 32
1961 1st 13 32 12 8 12 50 52 32 Semi-final
1962 1st 11 32 11 7 14 53 42 29 Round of 32
1963 1st 6 38 14 17 7 45 32 45 Round of 32
1964 1st 11 32 9 9 14 30 35 27 Round of 16
1965 1st 9 32 10 12 10 32 32 32 Round of 32
1966 1st 16 36 10 8 18 35 54 28 Round of 16
1967 1st 19 36 6 9 21 28 63 21 Round of 32
1968 1st 11 38 10 14 14 35 49 34 Round of 32
1969 1st 9 26 6 9 11 21 34 21 Round of 16
1970 1st 14 32 10 7 15 30 40 27 Quarter-final
1971 1st 13 30 8 10 12 29 32 26 Quarter-final
1972 1st 7 30 11 11 8 44 30 33 Quarter-final
1973 1st 11 30 9 12 9 33 35 21 Round of 16
1974 1st 7 30 8 15 7 36 41 31 Round of 16
1975 1st 14 30 7 10 13 27 42 24 Round of 16
1976 1st 13 15 4 5 6 14 15 13
1976 1st 5 15 6 4 5 22 16 16 Round of 16
1977 1st 10 30 8 12 10 34 33 28 Semi-final
1978 1st 10 30 9 8 13 31 46 26 Quarter-final
1979 1st 10 34 11 9 14 41 45 30 Group stage
1980 1st 3 34 16 10 8 51 42 42 Group Stage
1981 1st 15 34 9 10 15 33 43 28 Round of 16
1982 1st 7 34 12 9 13 44 41 33 Group stage UC First round
1983 1st 4 34 15 11 8 42 32 40 Semi-final
1984 1st 1 34 19 9 6 60 32 47 Runner-up
1985 1st 6 34 14 7 13 48 38 35 Semi-final
1986 1st 4 30 12 9 9 44 36 33 Semi-final ECC Second round
1987 1st 14 30 7 10 13 25 37 24 Round of 16
1988 1st 6 30 11 9 10 35 34 31 Round of 16 UC First round
1989 1st 16 30 5 9 16 24 48 19 Round of 16
1990 2nd 18 38 8 14 16 35 41 30 Round of 32 UC Second round
1991 2nd 18 42 11 14 17 44 50 36 Round of 32

League results

ImageSize = width:600 height:60 PlotArea = left:10 right:10 bottom:30 top:10 TimeAxis = orientation:horizontal format:yyyy DateFormat = dd/mm/yyyy Period = from:01/01/1991 till:01/07/2008 ScaleMajor = unit:year increment:1 start:1992 Colors =

 id:bl1  value:rgb(0.5,0.8,0.5)
 id:bl2  value:rgb(0.9,0.9,0.3)  
 id:rs  value:rgb(0.8,0.6,0.6)
 id:rn  value:rgb(0.9,0.1,0.1)

PlotData=

 bar:Position width:15 color:white align:center
 from:01/07/1991 till:01/07/1992  shift:(0,-4) text: 16
 from:01/07/1992 till:01/07/1993  shift:(0,-4) text:2
 from:01/07/1993 till:01/07/1994  shift:(0,-4) text: 13
 from:01/07/1994 till:01/07/1995  shift:(0,-4) text:3
 from:01/07/1995 till:01/07/1996  shift:(0,-4) text: 10
 from:01/07/1996 till:01/07/1997  shift:(0,-4) text:8
 from:01/07/1997 till:01/07/1998  shift:(0,-4) text:5
 from:01/07/1998 till:01/07/1999  shift:(0,-4) text:8
 from:01/07/1999 till:01/07/2000  shift:(0,-4) text:7
 from:01/07/2000 till:01/07/2001  shift:(0,-4) text:3
 from:01/07/2001 till:01/07/2002  shift:(0,-4) text: 10
 from:01/07/2002 till:01/07/2003  shift:(0,-4) text:2
 from:01/07/2003 till:01/07/2004  shift:(0,-4) text:4
 from:01/07/2004 till:01/07/2005  shift:(0,-4) text:6
 from:01/07/2005 till:01/07/2006  shift:(0,-4) text:4
 from:01/07/2006 till:01/07/2007  shift:(0,-4) text:1
 from:01/07/2007 till:01/07/2008  shift:(0,-4) text:5
 from:01/01/1991 till:01/07/1992  color:bl1  shift:(0,13)  text: "RPL"
 from:01/07/1992 till:01/07/1995  color:bl2  shift:(0,13)  text: "1D"
 from:01/07/1995 till:01/07/2008  color:bl1  shift:(0,13)  text: "Russian Premier League"

Current squad

As of 12 March 2009.[6]
No. Position Player
1 GK Kamil Čontofalský
2 DF Aleksandr Anyukov (vice-captain)
3 DF Fernando Meira
4 DF Ivica Križanac
5 Template:Country data South Korea DF Kim Dong-Jin
6 File:Flag of Belgium (civil).svg DF Nicolas Lombaerts
8 FW Pavel Pogrebnyak
9 FW Fatih Tekke
10 MF Danny
11 MF Radek Šírl
No. Position Player
14 DF Tomáš Hubočan
15 MF Roman Shirokov
16 GK Vyacheslav Malafeev (captain)
18 MF Konstantin Zyryanov
20 MF Viktor Fayzulin
21 MF Igor Semshov
23 MF Szabolcs Huszti
25 MF Fernando Ricksen
27 MF Igor Denisov
57 MF Aleksei Ionov

Squad number 12 is reserved for Zenit's supporters.

Players out on loan

No. Position Player
22 GK Dmitriy Borodin (at Khimki)
28 DF Sébastien Puygrenier (at Bolton Wanderers)
34 DF Aleksandr Khokhlov (at Kuban)
40 DF Ivan Lapin (at Rostov)
41 GK Mikhail Kerzhakov (at Volgar-Gazprom)
42 MF Boris Rotenberg (at Khimki)
75 DF Yuri Lebedev (at Nosta)
77 MF Oleg Samsonov (at Khimki)
No. Position Player
87 MF Ilya Maximov (at Khimki)
FW Oleg Kozhanov (at Khimki)
MF Semyon Melnikov (at Vityaz)
DF Sergei Gorbunov (at Smena-Zenit)
MF Nikita Kolesnikov (at Smena-Zenit)
MF Artyom Kulesha (at Smena-Zenit)
MF Pavel Zubov (at Smena-Zenit)
FW German Pyatnikov (at Smena-Zenit)

U-21 squad

As of 11 March 2009.[7]
No. Position Player
30 MF Pavel Komolov
31 FW Vitali Galysh
33 FW Pavel Ignatovich
35 MF Anton Sosnin
36 FW Stanislav Matyash
37 DF Dmitri Grebenev
47 MF Basel Abdulfattakh
50 DF Igor Cheminava
51 GK Vladimir Mukhin
53 MF Pavel Mochalin
55 DF Yan Bobrovskiy
59 MF Sergey Vasetskiy
65 DF Yuri Boyev
No. Position Player
69 MF Yevgeni Bashkirov
70 FW Vyacheslav Sushkin
71 FW Sergei Kostin
75 MF Ilya Sagdatullin
77 MF Aleksandr Petrov
79 FW Andrei Ornat
87 Template:Country data USA FW Yevgeni Starikov
90 GK Nikolai Zabolotny
91 GK Andrei Zaytsev
96 MF Roland Gigolayev
98 MF Sergei Petrov
99 FW Maksim Kanunnikov

Notable players

Had international caps for their respective countries. Players whose name is listed in bold represented their countries while playing for Zenit.

USSR/Russia

Former USSR countries

Europe
Asia

References

External links

Official websites
Official merchandise
General fan sites

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