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FIE World Championships in Fencing: Wikis

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The World Championships in Fencing is an annual competition organized by the Fédération Internationale d'Escrime or FIE, (International Fencing Federation in English). The world championships are, after the Olympic Games, the most prominent international competition in the sport of fencing. Contestants may participate in foil, épée, and sabre events.

Contents

History

The FIE first organized an international fencing championship in Paris in 1921. The competition in its early years was billed as a European fencing tournament, and the initial participants were members of the fencing federations of the various European nations. In 1937, the FIE, at the request of an Italian contingent of fencers, granted world title status to the annual tournament. (The government of Benito Mussolini in Italy was, at this time, offering national recognition and privileges to winners of Olympic or world titles.)[1]

Since 1921, the FIE championships have occurred annually, with the exception of all events held during the Summer Olympics after 1960, and an interruption forced by World War II between 1938 and 1947. Events not held during the Summer Olympics[2] have the FIE championship at a designated World Cup in the same year.

The three types of events were introduced successively. Men's épée competition began in 1921, sabre in 1922, and foil in 1926. Since 1929, women's competitions in foil have taken place.[3][4] A women's épée event was added in 1989, and women's sabre in 1999.

The year 1929 also saw the first team competition, in the foil event. Team events for sabre and épée were initiated in 1930. The women's team foil event began in 1932.[3][4] Team competition for women in épée and sabre began the same year as the individual women's events (1989 for épée and 1999 for sabre).

Hosts

 

Total medals by country

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Soviet Union
 Russia
 
91
30
121
56
17
73
46
17
63
193
64
257
2  Italy 83 75 91 249
3  France 69 66 70 205
4  Hungary 62 65 74 201
5  Germany
 West Germany
 East Germany
 
20
23
0
43
26
26
1
53
37
14
1
52
83
63
2
148
6  Poland 17 27 38 82
7  Romania 11 22 19 52
8  Sweden 6 12 17 35
9  Cuba 6 5 9 20
10  Ukraine 6 5 7 18
11  United States 4 3 3 10
12  Denmark 4 3 2 9
13  Austria 4 0 5 9
14  China 3 11 13 27
15  United Kingdom 2 3 4 9
16  South Korea 2 2 10 14
17  Azerbaijan 2 1 4 7
18  Switzerland 1 7 6 14
19  Estonia 1 4 3 8
20  Bulgaria 1 3 4 8
21  Czechoslovakia 1 3 1 5
22  Spain 1 2 5 8
23  Belgium 0 2 5 7
24  Canada 0 1 2 3
25  Portugal 0 1 0 1
26  Egypt 0 0 7 7
27  Netherlands 0 0 3 3
28  Belarus 0 0 2 2
29  Colombia 0 0 1 1
30  Finland 0 0 1 1
31  Japan 0 0 1 1
32  Norway 0 0 1 1
Total 450 449 523 1422

References

  1. ^ Cohen. By the Sword. pp. 375, footnote.  
  2. ^ BBC - h2g2 - A Guide to Olympic Sports - Fencing
  3. ^ a b Cohen. By the Sword. pp. 372.  
  4. ^ a b Evangelista. Encyclopedia of the Sword. pp. 624–631.  
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Sources

  • Evangelista, Nick (1995). Encyclopedia of the Sword. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. ISBN 0-313-27896-2.  

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