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FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup
Founded 1995
Region International (FIFA)
Number of teams 16 (Finals)
Current champions  Brazil (13th title)
Most successful team  Brazil (13 titles)
Website www.fifa.com/beachsoccerworldcup/

The FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup is a football competition in beach football organised by the world football governing body FIFA for national teams.

Contents

History

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Foundation

The first Beach Soccer World Cup was held in Brazil, in 1995, organised by the founders of the standardised rules, Beach Soccer Worldwide, held under the title Beach Soccer World Championship. Eight teams were selected to take part, without going through a qualification process. However Brazil, the hosts, dominated and easily won the cup without losing a game. The tournament was successful and BSWW announced that the competition would take place every year.

Growth worldwide

By 1997, more teams had already stated their interest in participating and therefore BSWW extended their selection to 10 teams for 1998. Brazil continued to dominate, despite this change. Immediately, BSWW extended to 12 teams for 1999, spreading their selection across five continents, introducing more new teams to the tournament. However with all these changes it still took until the 2001 World Cup for Brazil to lose the title after winning the competition six years on the run since the establishment. It was Portugal who won the tournament, with Brazil finishing in a disappointing fourth place.

Brazil national beach soccer team: 13 times winners and current world champions

With this change of champions, more countries thought there was a chance for themselves to win the tournament and this sparked more interest worldwide. Not surprisingly, Brazil reclaimed their title in 2002, when BSWW reduced the number of contestants back to eight. The last Beach Soccer World Championship to be organised purely by BSWW was in 2004 when twelve teams played, seven from Europe.

FIFA Era

In 2005, FIFA paired up with BSWW to co-organise the World Cup, although FIFA seem to have the most control. They kept the tradition of holding the World Cup in Rio de Janeiro and continued to allow 12 teams to participate, following on from the 2004 competition. It was Eric Cantona's France that won the competition, after beating Portugal on penalties in the final.

A scene from the 2007 event in Brazil

The tournament was deemed a major success and therefore FIFA took advantage. For the 2006 competition and beyond, FIFA decided to standardise the participants to 16 countries. It was then that the FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Qualifiers were also established, that would take place throughout the year. Again this decision was a successful one and more countries became interested in a now standard FIFA competition.

Extending the World Cup

By the end of the 2007 World Cup, the tournament had become very popular throughout the world, thanks to the highly respected FIFA board taking over the competition, influencing more countries to take beach soccer more seriously as a major sport. Since the World Cup had become a success worldwide, FIFA decided to have a change of venue. It was voted, to extend the sport's popularity, the 2008 World Cup would take place in Marseille, France, and the 2009 World Cup would take place in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. These tournaments would be the first to take place outside Brazil. The 2008 competition was once again a major success, despite being held in a different country. This was the first time that Brazil would have to qualify for the tournament, since they weren't the hosts. However Brazil won the qualifiers and the World Cup in July. The 2009 World Cup in Dubai looks to be an even bigger success, as the second competition outside Brazil and the Beach Soccer World Cup's 15th birthday.

Qualification

From 1995 to 2005 (inclusive), teams were selected for the World Cup; they did not have to qualify. However with the interest from so many countries, FIFA decided to standardise the format for the World Cup in 2006 for future World Cups. FIFA agreed that countries from each confederation will play in FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup Qualifiers, with 16 teams eventually qualifying for the finals. The number of countries qualifying from each confederation would always be the same as the table shows below:

Confederation (Continent) Amount of countries qualifying
UEFA Europe 5 teams
CONMEBOL South America 3 teams
AFC Asia 2 teams
CAF Africa 2 teams
CONCACAF North, Central America and the Caribbean 2 teams
OFC Oceania 1 team
Total (Plus Host Nation) 16 teams

Qualification continues to be the same. Note that the host countries' continent loses one qualification spot. E.g. since the 2009 World Cup is in United Arab Emirates, they automatically qualify as an Asian team. Therefore in the AFC Beach Soccer Word Cup Qualifiers, only two teams will qualify to join the hosts, UAE.

Results

FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup

Year Location Winners Runners-up Third place Fourth place Player of the tournament Top goalscorer(s) Best goalkeeper Goals (average per game)
2009
Details
United Arab Emirates Jumeirah Beach, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Brazil

Switzerland

Portugal

Uruguay
Dejan Stankovic (SUI) 16 goals
Dejan Stankovic (SUI)
Mão (BRA) 269 (8.7)
2008
Details
France Plage du Prado, Marseille, France
Brazil

Italy

Portugal

Spain
Amarelle (ESP) 13 goals
Madjer (POR)
Roberto Valeiro (ESP) 258 (8.3)
2007
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Mexico

Uruguay

France
Buru (BRA) 10 goals
Buru (BRA)
249 (7.8)
2006
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Uruguay

France

Portugal
Madjer (POR) 21 goals
Madjer (POR)
286 (8.9)
2005
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
France

Portugal

Brazil

Japan
Madjer (POR) 12 goals
Madjer (POR)
164 (8.2)

Beach Soccer World Championship

Year Location Winners Runners-up Third place Fourth place Player of the tournament Top goalscorer(s) Best goalkeeper Goals (average per game)
2004
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Spain

Portugal

Italy
Jorginho (BRA) 12 goals
Madjer (POR)
Roberto (ESP) 155 (7.8)
2003
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Spain

Portugal

France
Amarelle (ESP) 15 goals
Neném (BRA)
Robertinho (BRA) 150 (9.4)
2002
Details
Brazil Vitória (Espírito Santo) and
Guarujá (São Paulo), Brazil

Brazil

Portugal

Uruguay

Thailand
Neném (BRA) 9 goals
Neném (BRA)
Madjer (POR)
Nico (URU)
Normcharoen (THA) 145 (9.1)
2001
Details
Brazil Costa do Sauípe, Bahia, Brazil
Portugal

France

Argentina

Brazil
Hernâni (POR) 10 goals
Alan (POR)
Olmeta (FRA) 144 (7.2)
2000
Details
Brazil Marina da Glória, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Peru

Spain

Japan
Júnior (BRA) 13 goals
Júnior (BRA)
Kato (JPN) 172 (8.6)
1999
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Portugal

Uruguay

Peru
Jorginho (BRA) 10 goals
Júnior (BRA)
Matosas (URU)
Pedro Crespo (POR) 186 (9.3)
1998
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

France

Uruguay

Peru
Júnior (BRA) 14 goals
Júnior (BRA)
Paulo Sérgio (BRA) 219 (9.1)
1997
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Uruguay

United States

Argentina
Júnior (BRA) 11 goals
Júnior (BRA)
Venancio Ramos (URU)
Paulo Sérgio (BRA) 144 (9.0)
1996
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

Uruguay

Italy

United States
Edinho (BRA) 14 goals
Altobelli (ITA)
Paulo Sérgio (BRA) 131 (8.2)
1995
Details
Brazil Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazil

United States

England

Italy
Zico (BRA)
Júnior (BRA)
12 goals
Zico (BRA)
Altobelli (ITA)
Paulo Sérgio (BRA) 149 (9.3)

Successful national teams

Map of each countries best performance in the FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup

In all, 38 nations have played in at least one World Beach Soccer Cup. Of these, only three nations have successfully won the World Cup in 15 years. Brazil have won 13 World Cups and clearly dominate. Portugal, who eliminated Brazil both times they did not win, won in 2001. France won in the first FIFA sanctioned tournament in 2005. Both Brazil and Uruguay are the only nations to have played in every World Cup to date.

Team Titles Runners-up Third-place Fourth-place
 Brazil 13 (1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009) - 1 (2005) 1 (2001)
 Portugal 1 (2001) 3 (1999, 2002, 2005) 4 (2003, 2004, 2008, 2009) 1 (2006)
 France 1 (2005) 2 (1998, 2001) 1 (2006) 2 (2003, 2007)
 Uruguay - 3 (1996, 1997, 2006) 4 (1998, 1999, 2002, 2007) 1 (2009)
 Spain - 2 (2003, 2004) 1 (2000) 1 (2008)
 Italy - 1 (2008) 1 (1996) 2 (1995, 2004)
 United States - 1 (1995) 1 (1997) 1 (1996)
 Peru - 1 (2000) - 2 (1998, 1999)
 Mexico - 1 (2007) - -
 Switzerland - 1 (2009) - -
 Argentina - - 1 (2001) 1 (1997)
 England - - 1 (1995) -
 Japan - - - 2 (2000, 2005)
 Thailand - - - 1 (2002)

Tournament appearances as of 2009

Map of the countries that have appeared in any World Cup

Since the tournament's establishment in 1995, as of the 2009 World Cup, 38 different countries have participated over the 15 competitions. However only two countries have successfully participated in all World Cups, which are Brazil and Uruguay. Surprisingly, Uruguay have never won the trophy, whereas Brazil have won 13 of the 15. European teams have dominated in appearances by continent, since 14 of the 38 different countries have been from Europe. Since qualification has been standardised, fewer new countries are expected to make an appearance.

Appearances Country
15  Brazil
 Uruguay
13  Italy
 Portugal
12  Argentina
 France
 Spain
 United States
9  Japan
5  Peru
4  Germany
 Russia
 Solomon Islands
3  Canada
 Iran
 Nigeria
 United Arab Emirates
2  Bahrain
 Cameroon
 Costa Rica
 El Salvador
 Mexico
 Senegal
 Switzerland
 South Africa
 Thailand
 Venezuela
1  Australia
 Belgium
 Chile
 Côte d'Ivoire
 Denmark
 England
 Malaysia
 Netherlands
 Poland
 Turkey
 Ukraine

References

External links


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