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Faith Bacon (born ca. 1909, Los Angeles, California – died September 26, 1956, Chicago, Illinois) was an American starlet turned burlesque dancer.

Between 1928 and 1931, Bacon appeared on Broadway in Earl Carroll's Vanities, Fioretta, Earl Carroll's Sketch Book and the Ziegfeld Follies of 1931.

She was known as a burlesque dancer whose act consisted of two swirling ostrich fans and a smoky spotlight. She sometimes used flowers and bubbles. In 1933, Bacon competed with Sally Rand as fan-dancers at the World's Fair, but Bacon's star faded after the World's Fair. Her sole known celluloid (film) role was in the 1938 film, Prison Train (as "Maxine").

In 1954, she took an overdose of sleeping pills. Two years later she came to Chicago from Erie, Pennsylvania and checked into the Alan Hotel. She looked for work, but could not find any work.

Contents

Death

Shortly after midnight on September 26, 1956, she was walking down the stairs of the hotel between the fourth and third floors and suddenly opened a window. As a friend grabbed at her skirt, she tore loose and jumped out the window. Her body landed on the roof of a one-story saloon next door. She was believed to be 47 years old. Her friend told reporters that Bacon “wanted the spotlight again. She would have taken any kind of work in show business.” [1]

Her effects reportedly comprised “[M]iscellaneous clothing, one white metal ring, train ticket to Erie, Pa., and 85 cents”, and a pair of rented fans. [2]

When relatives could not be located, the American Guild of Variety Artists claimed her body and arranged for burial.

Miscellaneous

Her real name and date of birth remain unknown.

References

  1. ^ Biodata from morethanyouneededtoknow.typepad.com
  2. ^ Ibid.

External links

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