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Famitsū

Cover art for first issue of Famitsū magazine, June 1986, then known as Famicom Tsūshin.
Categories Video game
Frequency Weekly / Monthly / Quarterly
Circulation 500,000 (Weekly)
150,000 (PS)
120,000 (Xbox)
105,000 (DS+Wii)
100,000 (WaveDVD)[1]
Publisher Enterbrain, Inc., Tokuma
First issue June 1986
Country Japan
Language Japanese
Website www.famitsu.com

Famitsū (ファミ通 ?) (formerly Famicom Tsūshin) is a Japanese video game magazine published by Enterbrain, Inc. and Tokuma. Currently, there are five console-only spin-off versions of Famitsū: Shūkan Famitsū, Famitsū PS, Famitsū Xbox, Famitsū Wii+DS, and Famitsū Wave DVD. Shūkan Famitsū (週刊ファミ通 ?, lit. "Weekly Famitsū"), the original Famitsū publication, is considered the most famous video game news magazine in Japan.[2][3][4]

Contents

Shūkan Famitsū

Shūkan Famitsū concentrates on video game reviews, as well as video game industry news. The name Famitsū was originally an abbreviation of Famicom Tsūshin (ファミコン通信 ?, officially translated as the Famicom Journal), the magazine's original name came from the Family Computer, the Japanese name for the Nintendo Entertainment System, which was the dominant video game console during the 1980s in Japan. The first issue was published on June 6, 1986. Today, Shūkan Famitsū features multi-platform coverage. Shūkan Famitsū is published every Thursday with a circulation of 500,000 per issue.[1]

Others

Famitsū publishes other magazines dedicated to particular consoles. Currently in circulation are:

  • Famitsū Wii+DS, which report on Nintendo platforms (currently the Nintendo DS and Wii). The magazine was formerly known as Famitsū 64 and then Famitsū Cube (among other variations of those two names) based on whatever platforms Nintendo was producing games for at the time.
  • Famitsū Wave DVD (ファミ通 Wave DVD) is published monthly. Each magazine includes a DVD disc (NTSC Region 2) with video game footage. The magazine was originally called GameWave DVD.

Famitsū spin-offs that are no longer in circulation include Famitsū Bros. (which concentrated on video game hints and strategy rather than actual news), Famitsū Sister (which covered bishōjo games) and Famitsū DC (which covered the Dreamcast).

Scoring

Video games are graded in Famitsū by a panel of four video game reviewers. Each reviewer gives a score from zero to ten (ten being best). The scores of the four reviewers are then added up with a possible score of forty.

Though Famitsū reviewers have received notoriety for their selectiveness,[5] recent review scores have generally taken an upswing, and many games now often receive scores of eight or nine out of ten from the magazine's review editors. It is still extremely rare for a game to receive a perfect score of forty from Famitsū's reviewers.

From the thirteen games awarded with the perfect score so far, two are for the Nintendo DS, four are for the Wii, and the others are all for different platforms. The number of perfect scores awarded by Famitsu has greatly accelerated in recent years—more than half of them were awarded from 2008 onward. All games with perfect scores so far are from Japanese companies, being five of them published/developed by Nintendo, two were published by Sega, and three are properties of Square Enix, including Vagrant Story (by the company's current subsidiary Square Co.) The only completely foreign games to achieve a near-perfect score so far are Grand Theft Auto IV from Rockstar Games, also released in 2008, and Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2, released in 2009. (Kingdom Hearts II is a joint effort between Square Enix and the U.S.-based Buena Vista Games.) Famitsū Wave DVD does not grade video games.

Perfect scores

Thirteen games have received perfect scores from Famitsu. They are listed in chronological order:

  1. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (1998, Nintendo, for Nintendo 64)
  2. Soulcalibur (1999, Namco, for Dreamcast)
  3. Vagrant Story (2000, Square Co., for PlayStation)
  4. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (2003, Nintendo, for Nintendo GameCube)
  5. Nintendogs (2005, Nintendo, for Nintendo DS)
  6. Final Fantasy XII (2006, Square Enix, for PlayStation 2)
  7. Super Smash Bros. Brawl (2008, Nintendo, for Wii)
  8. Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots (2008, Konami, for PlayStation 3)
  9. 428: Fūsa Sareta Shibuya de (2008, Sega, for Wii)
  10. Dragon Quest IX: Sentinels of the Starry Skies (2009, Square Enix, for Nintendo DS)
  11. Monster Hunter Tri (2009, Capcom, for Wii)
  12. Bayonetta (2009, Platinum Games, for Xbox 360)
  13. New Super Mario Bros. Wii (2009, Nintendo, for Wii)


Games that received a near-perfect score of 39 include:

  1. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (1991, Nintendo, for Super Famicom)
  2. Virtua Fighter 2 (1995, Sega, for Sega Saturn)
  3. Ridge Racer Revolution (1995, Namco, for PlayStation)
  4. Super Mario 64 (1996, Nintendo, for Nintendo 64)
  5. Tekken 3 (1998, Namco, for PlayStation)
  6. Cyber Troopers Virtual-On Oratorio Tangram (1999, Sega, for Dreamcast)
  7. Final Fantasy X (2001, Square Co., for PlayStation 2)
  8. Gran Turismo 3: A-Spec (2001, Sony Computer Entertainment, for PlayStation 2)
  9. Resident Evil (2002, Capcom, for Nintendo GameCube)
  10. Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King (2004, Square Enix, for PlayStation 2)
  11. Gran Turismo 4 (2004, Sony Computer Entertainment, for PlayStation 2)
  12. Kingdom Hearts II (2005, Square Enix and Buena Vista Games, for PlayStation 2)
  13. Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence (2005, Konami, for PlayStation 2)
  14. Dead or Alive 4 (2005, Tecmo, for Xbox 360)
  15. Ōkami (2006, Capcom, for PlayStation 2)
  16. The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass (2007, Nintendo, for Nintendo DS)
  17. Grand Theft Auto IV (2008, Rockstar, for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)
  18. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 (2009, Activision, for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)
  19. Final Fantasy XIII (2009, Square Enix, for Playstation 3)[6]

All Time Top 10 by the readers

In March 2006 Japanese Famitsū magazine readers voted on their 100 all-time favorite games. (Full list). The top ten games picked by fans were:

  1. Final Fantasy X (2001)
  2. Final Fantasy VII (1997)
  3. Dragon Quest III (1988)
  4. Dragon Quest VIII (2004)
  5. Machi (1998)
  6. Final Fantasy IV (1991)
  7. Tactics Ogre (1995)
  8. Final Fantasy III (1990)
  9. Dragon Quest VII (2000)
  10. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (1998)

Relationship with other magazines

UK trade magazine MCV and Famitsu have an exclusive partnership which sees news and content from each magazine appear in the other.[7]

See also

References

External links

This article contains Japanese text. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of kanji and kana.

Famitsu
File:Famitsu - Issue
Cover art for the very first issue of Famitsū magazine, June 1986, then known as Famicom Tsūshin.
Categories Video game
Frequency Weekly / Monthly / Quarterly
Circulation 500,000 (Weekly)
150,000 (PS)
120,000 (Xbox)
105,000 (DS+Wii)
100,000 (WaveDVD)[1]
Publisher Enterbrain, Inc., Tokuma
First issue June 1986
Country Template:Country data Japan Japan
Language Japanese
Website www.famitsu.com

Famitsū (ファミ通?) (formerly Famicom Tsūshin) is a line of Japanese video game magazines published by Enterbrain, Inc. and Tokuma. Currently, there are five Famitsū magazines: Shūkan Famitsū, Famitsū PS3 + PSP, Famitsū Xbox 360, Famitsū Wii+DS, and Famitsū Wave DVD. Shūkan Famitsū (週刊ファミ通?, lit. "Weekly Famitsū"), the original Famitsū publication, is considered the most widely read and respected video game news magazine in Japan.[2][3][4]

Contents

Shūkan Famitsū

Shūkan Famitsū concentrates on video game news, as well as video game reviews. The name Famitsū was originally an abbreviation of Famicom Tsūshin (ファミコン通信?, officially translated as the Famicom Journal),[citation needed] the magazine's original name came from the Family Computer, the Japanese name for the Nintendo Entertainment System, which was the dominant video game console during the 1980s in Japan. The first issue was published on June 6, 1986. Today, Shūkan Famitsū features multi-platform coverage. Shūkan Famitsū is published every Thursday with a circulation of 500,000 per issue.[1]

Necky the Fox

Famitsū magazine covers alternately feature pop idols or actresses on even-numbered issues and the Famitsū mascot, Necky (ネッキー?) the Fox[5] in odd-numbered issues.[6] Year-end and special editions all feature Necky dressed as popular contemporary video game characters. Necky is the cartoon creation of artist, Susumu Matsushita, and he takes the form of a costumed fox.[7] The costumes worn by Necky reflect current popular video games. Necky's name was chosen according to a reader poll, and it derives from a complex Japanese pun: "Necky" is actually the reverse of the Japanese word for fox, kitsune (キツネ?), and his original connection to Famicom Tsūshin is intended to evoke the bark of the fox, the Japanese onomatopoeia of which is コンコン ("kon kon"?).[8]

Others

Famitsū publishes other magazines dedicated to particular consoles. Currently in circulation are:

  • Famitsū PS (ファミ通PS?) (formerly PlayStation Tsūshin), which reports on Sony platforms news (currently the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable).
  • Famitsū Wii+DS (ファミ通DS+Wii?), which report on Nintendo platforms (currently the Nintendo DS and Wii). The magazine was formerly known as Famitsū 64 and then Famitsū Cube (among other variations of those two names) based on whatever platforms Nintendo was producing games for at the time.
  • Famitsū Xbox (ファミ通Xbox?), which reports on Xbox and Xbox 360 news.
  • Famitsū Wave DVD (ファミ通WaveDVD?) (ファミ通 Wave DVD) is published monthly. Each magazine includes a DVD disc (NTSC Region 2) with video game footage. The magazine was originally called GameWave DVD.

Famitsū spin-offs that are no longer in circulation include:

  • Famitsū Bros. (ファミ通ブロス?) (which concentrated on video game hints and strategy rather than actual news)
  • Satellaview Tsūshin (サテラビュー通信?) (which covered the Satellaview)
  • Famitsū Sister (ファミ通Sister?) (which covered bishōjo games)
  • Famitsū DC (ファミ通DC?) (which covered the Dreamcast)
  • Virtual Boy Tsūshin (バーチャルボーイ通信?) (which covered the Virtual Boy)

Scoring

Video games are graded in Famitsū by a panel of four video game reviewers. Each reviewer gives a score from zero to ten (ten being best). The scores of the four reviewers are then added up with a possible score of forty.

From the fifteen games awarded with the perfect score so far, three are for the Nintendo DS, four are for the Wii, and the others are all for different platforms. All games with perfect scores so far are from Japanese companies, six of them being published/developed by Nintendo, two were published by Sega, two by Konami and three are properties of Square Enix, including Vagrant Story (by the company's current subsidiary Square Co.) The only completely foreign games to achieve a near-perfect score so far are Grand Theft Auto IV from Rockstar Games, also released in 2008, The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion by Bethesda Softworks[9], and Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2, released in 2009. (Kingdom Hearts II is a joint effort between Square Enix and the U.S.-based Buena Vista Games.) Famitsū Wave DVD does not grade video games.

Perfect scores

Fifteen games have received perfect scores from Famitsu. They are listed in chronological order:

  1. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (1998, Nintendo, for Nintendo 64)[10]
  2. Soulcalibur (1999, Namco, for Dreamcast)[11]
  3. Vagrant Story (2000, Square Co., for PlayStation)[11]
  4. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (2003, Nintendo, for Nintendo GameCube)[11]
  5. Nintendogs (2005, Nintendo, for Nintendo DS)[11]
  6. Final Fantasy XII (2006, Square Enix, for PlayStation 2)[11]
  7. Super Smash Bros. Brawl (2008, Nintendo, for Wii)[12]
  8. Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots (2008, Konami, for PlayStation 3)[13]
  9. 428: Fūsa Sareta Shibuya de (2008, Sega, for Wii)[14]
  10. Dragon Quest IX: Sentinels of the Starry Skies (2009, Square Enix, for Nintendo DS)[15]
  11. Monster Hunter Tri (2009, Capcom, for Wii)[16]
  12. Bayonetta (2009, Sega, for Xbox 360)[17]
  13. New Super Mario Bros. Wii (2009, Nintendo, for Wii)[18]
  14. Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker (2010, Konami, for PlayStation Portable)[19]
  15. Pokémon Black and White (2010, Nintendo, for Nintendo DS)[20]

Games that received a near-perfect score of 39 include:

  1. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (1991, Nintendo, for Super Famicom)
  2. Virtua Fighter 2 (1995, Sega, for Sega Saturn)
  3. Ridge Racer Revolution (1995, Namco, for PlayStation)
  4. Super Mario 64 (1996, Nintendo, for Nintendo 64)
  5. Tekken 3 (1998, Namco, for PlayStation)
  6. Cyber Troopers Virtual-On Oratorio Tangram (1999, Sega, for Dreamcast)
  7. Final Fantasy X (2001, Square Co., for PlayStation 2)
  8. Gran Turismo 3: A-Spec (2001, Sony Computer Entertainment, for PlayStation 2)
  9. Resident Evil (2002, Capcom, for Nintendo GameCube)
  10. Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King (2004, Square Enix, for PlayStation 2)
  11. Gran Turismo 4 (2004, Sony Computer Entertainment, for PlayStation 2)
  12. Kingdom Hearts II (2005, Square Enix and Buena Vista Games, for PlayStation 2)[21]
  13. Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence (2005, Konami, for PlayStation 2)
  14. Dead or Alive 4 (2005, Tecmo, for Xbox 360)
  15. Ōkami (2006, Capcom, for PlayStation 2)
  16. The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass (2007, Nintendo, for Nintendo DS)[22]
  17. Grand Theft Auto IV (2008, Rockstar Games, for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3)
  18. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 (2009, Activision, for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3)
  19. Final Fantasy XIII (2009, Square Enix, for PlayStation 3)[23]
  20. Red Dead Redemption (2010, Rockstar Games, for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3)
  21. Naruto Shippuden: Ultimate Ninja Storm 2 (2010, CyberConnect 2, for PlayStation 2 and Xbox 360)

Relationship with other magazines

UK trade magazine MCV and Famitsu have an exclusive partnership which sees news and content from each magazine appear in the other.[24]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Enterbrain, Inc. Corporate Information" (in Japanese). Enterbrain. 2009. http://www.enterbrain.co.jp/corporate/goods.html. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  2. ^ Tor Thorsen (2006-03-08). "FFXII gets perfect score from Famitsu". GameSpot. http://www.gamespot.com/ps2/rpg/finalfantasy12/news.html?sid=6145598. Retrieved 2006-06-09. 
  3. ^ Steve Kalpaxidis (2005-07-01). "PS3 To Come Without Bundled HDD?". Advanced Media Network. http://psp.advancedmn.com/article.php?artid=1590. Retrieved 2006-06-09. 
  4. ^ Rodney Quinn (2006-03-09). "Final Fantasy XII scores perfect 40/40 in Famitsu reviews". Ars Technica. http://arstechnica.com/journals/thumbs.ars/2006/3/9/3107. Retrieved 2006-06-09. 
  5. ^ Ashcraft, Brian. Gaming Magazine Totally Snubs Xbox 360!?. Kotaku. 4 February 2008.
  6. ^ Gifford, Kevin. 'Game Mag Weaseling': Japan Mag Roundup 2008. GameSetWatch. 27 April 2008.
  7. ^ 'Necky the Fox' 今も尚輝き続ける松下進の代表的キャラクター. SusumuMatsushita.net. 10 July 2004.
  8. ^ Gifford, Kevin. Weekend Factyard: Famitsu/Famicom Tsushin MagWeasel. 19 September 2009.
  9. ^ http://www.next-gen.biz/features/japan-oblivion-and-face-training
  10. ^ "Zelda Receives Highest Ever Famitsu Score". IGN. 1998-11-13. http://ign64.ign.com/articles/065/065709p1.html. 
  11. ^ a b c d e Lumb, Jonathan (2006-03-08). "FF XII Scores Perfect In Famitsu". 1UP.com. http://1up.com/do/newsStory?cId=3148658. Retrieved 2006-08-13. 
  12. ^ Gray, Brian (2008-01-16). "Famitsu Gives Smash Bros. Brawl a Perfect Score". 1up.com. http://www.1up.com/do/newsStory?cId=3165462. Retrieved 2008-04-27. 
  13. ^ Ng, Keane (2008-06-04). "MGS4 Scores a Perfect 40/40 in Famitsu". Kombo.com. http://ps3.kombo.com/article.php?artid=7041. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  14. ^ [Expression error: Unexpected < operator "New Games Cross Review"] (in Japanese). Weekly Famitsu (Tokyo, Japan: Enterbrain, Inc.): 25. 2008-11-26. 
  15. ^ Fletcher, JC (2009-07-15). "Famitsu hands Dragon Quest IX a 40". Joystiq. http://www.joystiq.com/2009/07/15/famitsu-hands-dragon-quest-ix-a-40/. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  16. ^ Gifford, Kevin (2009-08-05). "Japan Review Check: Monster Hunter Tri". 1UP.com. http://www.1up.com/news/japan-review-check-monster-hunter. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  17. ^ Bailey, Kat (2009-10-20). "Famitsu Awards Xbox 360's Bayonetta Perfect Score". 1UP.com. http://www.1up.com/news/famitsu-awards-xbox-360-bayonetta. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  18. ^ McFerran, Damien (2009-11-24). "New Super Mario Bros. Wii Gets Perfect Score in Famitsu". Nintendo Life. http://wii.nintendolife.com/news/2009/11/new_super_mario_bros_wii_gets_perfect_score_in_famitsu. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  19. ^ Gantayat, Anoop (2010-04-10). "Metal Gear Solid Peace Walker Deemed Perfect by Famitsu". IGN. http://psp.ign.com/articles/108/1085091p1.html. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  20. ^ Funk, John (2010-09-08). "Pokemon Black & White Grab Rare Perfect Score from Famitsu". The Escapist. http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/103311-Pokemon-Black-White-Grab-Rare-Perfect-Score-from-Famitsu. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  21. ^ Freund, Josh (2005-12-20). "Latest Famitsu review scores - Kingdom Hearts II, Mario & Luigi 2, & more". GamesAreFun.com. http://www.gamesarefun.com/news.php?newsid=5915. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 
  22. ^ Miller, Ross (2007-06-07). "Famitsu loves Zelda, gives Phantom Hourglass near-perfect score". Joystiq. http://www.joystiq.com/2007/06/20/famitsu-loves-zelda-gives-phantom-hourglass-near-perfect-score/. Retrieved 2010-08-08. 
  23. ^ Reilly, Jim (2009-12-08). "First Final Fantasy XIII Review Score Not So Perfect". IGN. http://xbox360.ign.com/articles/105/1053314p1.html. Retrieved 2009-12-08. 
  24. ^ "MCV launches daily service". Intent Media. 2007-02-26. http://www.mcvuk.com/news/25830/MCV-launches-daily-service. Retrieved 2007-03-14. 

External links


Template:JapaneseText

Famitsū (ファミ通?, abbreviated ファミ Fami) (formerly Famicom Tsūshin) is a Japanese video game magazine published by Enterbrain, Inc. and Tokuma. Currently, there are five console-only spin-off versions of Famitsū: Shūkan Famitsū, Famitsū PS, Famitsū Xbox, Famitsū Wii+DS, and Famitsū Wave DVD. Shūkan Famitsū (週刊ファミ通?, lit. "Weekly Famitsū"), the original Famitsū publication, is considered the most famous video game news magazine in Japan.[1][2][3]

Contents

Shūkan Famitsū

Shūkan Famitsū concentrates on video game reviews, as well as video game industry news. The name Famitsū was originally an abbreviation of Famicom Tsūshin (ファミコン通信?, officially translated as Famicom Journal), the magazine's original name after the Family Computer, the Japanese name for the Nintendo Entertainment System, which was the dominant video game console during the 1980s in Japan. The first issue was published in 1986. Today, Shūkan Famitsū features multi-platform coverage. Shūkan Famitsū is published every Friday with a circulation of 800,000 per issue.

Others

Famitsū publishes other magazines dedicated to particular consoles. Currently in circulation are:

  • Famitsū Wii+DS, which report on Nintendo platforms (currently the Nintendo DS and Wii). The magazine was formerly known as Famitsū 64 and then Famitsū Cube (among other variations of those two names) based on whatever platforms Nintendo was producing games for at the time.
  • Famitsū Wave DVD (ファミ通 Wave DVD) is published monthly. Each magazine includes a DVD disc (NTSC Region 2) with video game footage. The magazine was originally called GameWave DVD.

Famitsū spin-offs that are no longer in circulation include Famitsū Bros. (which concentrated on video game hints and strategy rather than actual news), Famitsū Sister (which covered bishōjo games) and Famitsū DC (which covered the Dreamcast).

Scoring

Video games are graded in Famitsū by a panel of four video game reviewers. Each reviewer gives a score from one to ten (ten being best). The scores of the four reviewers are then added up with a possible score of forty.

Though Famitsū reviewers have received notoriety for their selectiveness,[4][5] recent review scores have generally taken an upswing, and many games now often receive scores of eight or nine out of ten from the magazine's review editors. Several recent Famitsū scores have been subject to controversy, with accusations that the magazine is raising scores to appease advertisers and the gaming industry, as was the case with its score for Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII. Template:Fact However, it is still extremely rare for a game to receive a perfect score of forty from Famitsū's reviewers. This score is so exclusive that it has, until November 2008, only been given to a single game on any given platform. The Wii is the first platform with two games that received perfect scores, and both released in the same year (2008).

All games with perfect scores so far are from Japanese companies and the only foreign game to achieve a near-perfect score so far is Grand Theft Auto IV from Rockstar Games, also released in 2008, not including Kingdom Hearts II which is a joint effort between the Japanese based Square Enix and the U.S. based Buena Vista Games. Famitsū Wave DVD does not grade video games.

Perfect scores

Only nine games so far have received perfect scores. They are listed in chronological order:

  1. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (1998, Nintendo, for Nintendo 64)
  2. Soulcalibur (1999, Namco, for Dreamcast)
  3. Vagrant Story (2000, Square Co., Ltd., for PlayStation)
  4. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (2003, Nintendo for Nintendo GameCube)
  5. Nintendogs (2005, Nintendo, for Nintendo DS)
  6. Final Fantasy XII (2006, Square Enix, for PlayStation 2)
  7. Super Smash Bros. Brawl (2008, Nintendo, for Wii)
  8. Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots (2008, Konami, for PlayStation 3)
  9. 428: Fūsasareta Shibuya de (2008, Sega, for Wii)

Games that received a near-perfect score of 39 include:

  1. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (1991, Nintendo, for Super Famicom)
  2. Virtua Fighter 2 (1995, Sega, for Sega Saturn)
  3. Ridge Racer Revolution (1995, Namco, for PlayStation)
  4. Super Mario 64 (1996, Nintendo, for Nintendo 64)
  5. Tekken 3 (1998, Namco, for PlayStation)
  6. Cyber Troopers Virtual-On Oratorio Tangram (1999, Sega, for Dreamcast)
  7. Final Fantasy X (2001, Square Co., Ltd., for PlayStation 2)
  8. Gran Turismo 3: A-Spec (2001, Sony Computer Entertainment, for PlayStation 2)
  9. Resident Evil (2002, Capcom, for Nintendo GameCube)
  10. Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King (2004, Square Enix, for PlayStation 2)
  11. Gran Turismo 4 (2004, Sony Computer Entertainment, for PlayStation 2)
  12. Kingdom Hearts II (2005, Square Enix and Buena Vista Games, for PlayStation 2)
  13. Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence (2005, Konami, for PlayStation 2)
  14. Dead or Alive 4 (2005, Tecmo, for Xbox 360)
  15. Ōkami (2006, Capcom, for PlayStation 2)
  16. The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass (2007, Nintendo, for Nintendo DS)
  17. Grand Theft Auto IV (2008, Rockstar, for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)

All Time Top 10 by the readers

In March 2006 Japanese Famitsū magazine readers voted on their 100 all-time favorite games. (Full list). The top ten games picked by fans were:

  1. Final Fantasy X (2001)
  2. Final Fantasy VII (1997)
  3. Dragon Quest III (1988)
  4. Dragon Quest VIII (2004)
  5. Machi (1998)
  6. Final Fantasy IV (1991)
  7. Tactics Ogre (1995)
  8. Final Fantasy III (1990)
  9. Dragon Quest VII (2000)
  10. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (1998)

Relationship with other magazines

UK trade magazine MCV and Famitsu have an exclusive partnership which sees news and content from each magazine appear in the other.[6]

See also

References

External links


Gaming

Up to date as of January 31, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Famitsu is an important Japanese video game magazine. It is actually seperated into four submagazines that are published at different times of the month: Weekly Famitsu, Famitsu Cube/Advance, Famitsu PS2 and Famitsu Xbox. Weekly Famitsu is considered to be a very respected source of news and reviews in the industry.

Reviews

Famitsu reviews are generally held in high regard for their high standards. They get 4 different reviewers, each with distinct taste in games. These reviewers range from old ladies to dance game fans. For every game, about 2 of the reviewers chosen are people who generally don't play this type of game. The other 2 are reviewers who would most likely enjoy the game. Each of the four reviewers give the game a score out of 10, and the score is added up. For this reason, a score of at least 20 is typical.

Perfect scores are rare. The only games to score 40/40 are: Vagrant Story, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, Soul Calibur, Nintendogs and Final Fantasy XII.

External Links

  • www.video-fenky.com — Hirokazu Hamamura (Famitsu #800, 04/16/04) on the future of video game magazines

This article uses material from the "Famitsu" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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