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Fear is an emotional response to a perceived threat. It is a basic survival mechanism occurring in response to a specific stimulus, such as pain or the threat of danger. Some psychologists such as John B. Watson, Freitas-Magalhaes,Robert Plutchik, and Paul Ekman have suggested that fear is one of a small set of basic or innate emotions. This set also includes such emotions as joy, sadness, and anger. Fear should be distinguished from the related emotional state of anxiety, which typically occurs without any external threat. Additionally, fear is related to the specific behaviors of escape and avoidance, whereas anxiety is the result of threats which are perceived to be uncontrollable or unavoidable.[1] Worth noting is that fear almost always relates to future events, such as worsening of a situation, or continuation of a situation that is unacceptable. Fear could also be an instant reaction, to something presently happening.

Contents

Etymology

The Old English term fear meant not the emotion engendered by a calamity or disaster, but rather the event itself. The first recorded usage of the term "fear" with the sense of the “emotion of fear” is found in a medieval work written in Middle English, composed circa 1290. The most probable explanation for the change in the meaning of the word "fear" is the existence in Old English of the related verb frighten, which meant “to terrify, take by surprise”.[2]

Description

A vivid description of fear was provided by Charles Darwin in his book, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals:

Fear is often preceded by astonishment, and is so far akin to it, that both lead to the senses of sight and hearing being instantly aroused. In both cases the eyes and mouth are widely opened, and the eyebrows raised. The frightened man at first stands like a statue motionless and breathless, or crouches down as if instinctively to escape observation. The heart beats quickly and violently, so that it palpitates or knocks against the ribs... That the skin is much affected under the sense of great fear, we see in the marvelous manner in which perspiration immediately exudes from it... The hairs also on the skin stand erect; and the superficial muscles shiver. In connection with the disturbed action of the heart, the breathing is hurried. The salivary glands act imperfectly; the mouth becomes dry, and is often opened and shut.[3]

The facial expression of fear includes the widening of the eyes (out of anticipation for what will happen next); the pupils dilate (to take in more light); the upper lip rises, the brows draw together, and the lips stretch horizontally. The physiological effects of fear can be better understood from the perspective of the sympathetic nervous responses (fight-or-flight), as compared to the parasympathetic response, which is a more relaxed state. Muscles used for physical movement are tightened and primed with oxygen, in preparation for a physical fight-or-flight response. Perspiration occurs due to blood being shunted from body's viscera to the peripheral parts of the body. Blood that is shunted from the viscera to the rest of the body will transfer, along with oxygen and nutrients, heat, prompting perspiration to cool the body. When the stimulus is shocking or abrupt, a common reaction is to cover (or otherwise protect) vulnerable parts of the anatomy, particularly the face and head. When a fear stimulus occurs unexpectedly, the victim of the fear response could possibly jump or give a small start. The person's heart-rate and heartbeat may quicken.

Varieties

Fear can be described with different terms in relation to the degree of fear that is experienced. It varies from mild caution to extreme phobia and paranoia. Fear is related to a number of additional cognitive and emotional states including worry, anxiety, terror, horror, panic, and dread. Experiences of fear can remain long after exposure in the unconscious mind, where they may then manifest as nightmares, or, in an even stronger form, night terrors. Fear may also be experienced within a larger group or social network, and may be compounded by social influence and become mass hysteria. Some pathologies related to fear (defined by persistent and irrational fears) can include different types of anxiety disorder which are very common, and also other more severe illnesses like the extreme phase of bipolar disorder and some kinds of schizophrenia.

The experience of distrust can be explained as a feeling of mild fear or caution, usually in response to an unfamiliar or potentially dangerous person. Distrust may occur as a feeling of warning towards someone or something that is questionable or unknown. For example, one may distrust a stranger who acts in a way that is perceived as odd or unusual. Likewise, one may distrust the safety of a rusty old bridge across a 100-foot drop. Distrust may serve as an adaptive, early warning signal for situations that could lead to greater fear and danger. Reassurance can usually disolve a fear like this e.g. repeatedly doing something to gain trust in it.

Terror is an acute and pronounced form of fear. It is an overwhelming sense of immediate personal danger. It can also be caused by perceiving the object of a phobia. Terror may overwhelm a person to the point of making irrational choices and atypical behavior. Paranoia is a term used to describe a psychosis of fear. It is experienced as long-standing feelings and perceptions of being persecuted. Paranoia is an extreme emotional state combined with cognitions or, more specifically, delusions that one is in danger. This degree of fear may indicate that a person has changed his or her normal behavior in extreme or maladaptive ways.

Thrill of Fear

Fear is usually perceived as a negative emotion--something to be afraid of or feared in itself. What keeps fear from being something enjoyable, may be the inability to have any control. When fear comes upon us out of the blue we have little or no awareness of it. We can assume how we might react in certain situations but until the situation is upon us we may find that we react completely differently. There are definitely many thrill seekers out there who thrive on being petrified. This can be seen in extreme sports or the adrenaline rush of a roller-coaster ride at a theme park. There are many types of fear but they are nearly all related to the known outcomes of the cause.

Common fears

According to surveys, some of the most commonly feared objects are spiders, snakes, heights, water, enclosed spaces, tunnels and bridges, social rejection, failure, and public speaking. In an innovative test of what people fear the most, Bill Tancer analyzed the most frequent online search queries that involved the phrase, "fear of...". This follows the assumption that people tend to seek information on the issues that concern them the most. His top ten list of fears consisted of flying, heights, clowns, intimacy, death, rejection, people, snakes, success, and driving.[4]

Another common fear can be of pain, or of someone damaging a person. Fear of pain in a plausible situation brings flinching, or cringing. Some people turn this into a game, where one throws a punch at the other, then hits them if they flinch. This is not a great idea, as flinching is a bodily reaction to danger and is a very sensitive feature, and must be treated as such.

In a 2005 Gallup poll (U.S.A.), a national sample of adolescents between the ages of 13 and 15 were asked what they feared the most. The question was open ended and participants were able to say whatever they wanted. The most frequently cited fear (mentioned by 8% of the teens) was terrorism. The top ten fears were, in order: terrorist attacks, spiders, death, being a failure, war, heights, criminal or gang violence, being alone, the future, and nuclear war.[5]

A military dog being used to intimidate a prisoner at Abu Ghraib Prison in Iraq

Causes

People develop specific fears as a result of learning. This has been studied in psychology as fear conditioning, beginning with John B. Watson's Little Albert experiment in 1920. In this study, an 11-month-old boy was conditioned to fear a white rat in the laboratory. The fear became generalized to include other white, furry objects. In the real world, fear can be acquired by a frightening traumatic accident. For example, if a child falls into a well and struggles to get out, he or she may develop a fear of wells, heights (acrophobia), enclosed spaces (claustrophobia), or water (aquaphobia). There are studies looking at areas of the brain that are affected in relation to fear. When looking at these areas (amygdala), it was proposed that a person learns to fear regardless of whether they themselves have experienced trauma, or if they have observed the fear in others. In a study completed by Andreas Olsson, Katherine I. Nearing and Elizabeth A. Phelps the amygdala were affected both when subjects observed someone else being submitted to an aversive event, knowing that the same treatment awaited themselves, and when subjects were subsequently placed in a fear-provoking situation. This suggests that fear can develop in both conditions,not just simply from personal history.

Although fear is learned, the capacity to fear is part of human nature. Many studies have found that certain fears (e.g. animals, heights) are much more common than others (e.g. flowers, clouds). These fears are also easier to induce in the laboratory. This phenomenon is known as preparedness. Because early humans that were quick to fear dangerous situations were more likely to survive and reproduce, preparedness is theorized to be a genetic effect that is the result of natural selection.

The experience of fear is affected by historical and cultural influences. For example, in the early 20th Century, many Americans feared polio, a disease that cripples the body part it affects, leaving that body part immobilized for the rest of one's life. There are also consistent cross-cultural differences in how people respond to fear. Display rules affect how likely people are to show the facial expression of fear and other emotions.

Neurobiology

The amygdala is a key brain structure in the neurobiology of fear. It is involved in the processing of negative emotions (such as fear and anger). Researchers have observed hyperactivity in the amygdala when patients who were shown threatening faces or confronted with frightening situations. Patients with a more severe social phobia showed a correlation with increased response in the amygdala.[6] Studies have also shown that subjects exposed to images of frightened faces, or faces of people from another race[7], exhibit increased activity in the amygdala.

The fear response generated by the amygdala can be mitigated by another brain region known as the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, located in the frontal lobe. In a 2006 study at Columbia University, researchers observed that test subjects experienced less activity in the amygdala when they consciously perceived fearful stimuli than when they unconsciously perceived fearful stimuli. In the former case, they discovered the rostral anterior cingulate cortex activates to dampen activity in amygdala, granting the subjects a degree of emotional control.[8]

The role of the amygdala in the processing of fear-related stimuli has been questioned by research upon those in which it is bilateral damaged. Even in the absence of their amygdala, they still react rapidly to fearful faces.[9]

Suppression of amygdala activity can also be achieved by pathogens. Rats infected with the toxoplasmosis parasite become less fearful of cats, sometimes even seeking out their urine-marked areas. This behavior often leads to them being eaten by cats. The parasite then reproduces within the body of the cat. There is evidence that the parasite concentrates itself in the amygdala of infected rats.[10]

Fear and death

Psychologists have addressed the hypothesis that fear of death motivates religious commitment, and that it may be alleviated by assurances about an afterlife. Empirical research on this topic has been equivocal.[citation needed] According to Kahoe and Dunn, people who are most firm in their faith and attend religious services weekly are the least afraid of dying. People who hold a loose religious faith are the most anxious, and people who are not religious are intermediate in their fear of death. A survey of people in various Christian denominations showed a positive correlation between fear of death and dogmatic adherence to religious doctrine. In other words, Christian fundamentalism and other strict interpretations of the Bible are associated with greater fear of death. Furthermore, some religious orientations were more effective than others in allaying that fear.[11]

In another study, data from a sample of white, Christian men and women were used to test the hypothesis that traditional, church-centered religiousness and de-institutionalized spiritual seeking are distinct ways of approaching fear of death in old age. Both religiousness and spirituality were related to positive psychosocial functioning, but only church-centered religiousness protected subjects against the fear of death.[12]

Fear of death is also known as death anxiety. This may be a more accurate label because, like other anxieties, the emotional state in question is long lasting and not typically linked to a specific stimulus. The analysis of fear of death, death anxiety, and concerns over mortality is an important feature of existentialism and terror management theory.

See also

References

  1. ^ Öhman, A. (2000). Fear and anxiety: Evolutionary, cognitive, and clinical perspectives. In M. Lewis & J. M. Haviland-Jones (Eds.). Handbook of emotions. (pp.573–593). New York: The Guilford Press.
  2. ^ The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, 2000, Houghton Mifflin Company.
  3. ^ Munger, M. (2003). The history of psychology. New York: Oxford University Press, pg. 221. Originally from The expression of emotion in man and animals, pg. 290.
  4. ^ Tancer, B. (2008). Click: What millions of people are doing online and why it matters. New York: Hyperion.
  5. ^ Gallup Poll: What Frightens America's Youth, March 29, 2005 Retrieved November 24, 2008.
  6. ^ Studying Brain Activity Could Aid Diagnosis Of Social Phobia. Monash University. January 19, 2006.
  7. ^ Differential response in the human amygdala to racial outgroup vs ingroup face stimuli. PMID 10943684
  8. ^ Emotional Control Circuit Of Brain's Fear Response Discovered. Retrieved on May 14, 2008.
  9. ^ Tsuchiya N, Moradi F, Felsen C, Yamazaki M, Adolphs R. (2009). Intact rapid detection of fearful faces in the absence of the amygdala. Nat Neurosci. 12:1224-12225. PMID 19718036
  10. ^ Berdoy M, Webster J, Macdonald D (2000). Fatal Attraction in Rats Infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, B267:1591–1594. PMID 11007336 doi:10.1038/nn.2380
  11. ^ Kahoe, R. D., & Dunn, R. F. (1976). The fear of death and religious attitudes and behavior, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 14, 379–382.
  12. ^ Wink, P. (2006). Who is afraid of death? Religiousness, spirituality, and death anxiety in late adulthood. Journal of Religion, Spirituality, & Aging, 18, 93–110.

Further reading

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Fear is a basic emotional sensation and response system ("feeling") initiated by an aversion to some perceived risk or threat.

Sourced

  • Upon earth there is not his like, who is made without fear.
  • Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
    I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.
  • The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? the Lord is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?
  • God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore will we not fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea.
  • As the heaven is high above the earth, so great is his mercy toward them that fear him.
  • The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.
  • Fear God, and keep his commandments: for this is the whole duty of man.
  • Quidquid id est, timeo Danaos et dona ferentis.
    • Translation: Whatever it is, I fear Greeks even when they bring gifts.
    • Virgil, The Aeneid, Bk. II, l. 49
  • Oderint dum metuant.
    • Translation: Let them hate, so long as they fear.
    • Lucius Accius, fragment
  • The fear of death is more to be dreaded than death itself.
  • For as children tremble and fear everything in the blind darkness, so we in the light sometimes fear what is no more to be feared than the things children in the dark hold in terror and imagine will come true.
    • Lucretius, De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Bk. II, l. 87
  • From this arises the question whether it is better to be loved rather than feared, or feared rather than loved. It might perhaps be answered that we should wish to be both: but since love and fear can hardly exist together, if we must choose between them, it is far safer to be feared than loved.
  • C'est de quoi j'ai le plus de peur que la peur.
    • Translation: The thing I fear most is fear.
    • Michel de Montaigne, Essais, Bk. I, ch. 18 (1580)
  • Extreme fear can neither fight nor fly.
  • Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind;
    The thief doth fear each bush an officer.
  • O God of battles! steel my soldiers' hearts;
    Possess them not with fear; take from them now
    The sense of reckoning, if the opposèd numbers
    Pluck their hearts from them.
  • Where love is great, the littlest doubts are fear;
    When little fears grow great, great love grows there.
  • The weariest and most loathed worldly life
    That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment
    Can lay on nature is a paradise
    To what we fear of death.
  • The fear of some divine and supreme powers keeps men in obedience.
    • Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, Pt. III, sec. 4, member 1, subsec. 2 (1621-1651)
  • Nothing is terrible except fear itself.
    • Francis Bacon, De Augmentis Scientiarum, Bk. II, Fortitudo (1623)
  • Men fear death as children fear to go in the dark; and as that natural fear in children is increased with tales, so is the other.
  • Who is all-powerful should fear everything.
  • L'amour de la justice n'est en la plupart des hommes que la crainte de souffrir l'injustice.
    • Translation: The love of justice is simply in the majority of men the fear of suffering injustice.
    • François de La Rochefoucauld, Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims, Maxim 78 (1665–1678)
  • Notre repentir n'est pas tant un regret du mal que nous avons fait, qu'une crainte de celui qui nous en peut arriver.
    • Translation: Our repentance is not so much sorrow for the ill we have done as a fear of the ill that may befall us.
    • François de La Rochefoucauld, Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims, Maxim 180 (1665–1678)
  • Death in itself is nothing; but we fear
    To be we know not what, we know not where.
  • Fear cannot be without hope nor hope without fear.
  • The greatest weakness of all weaknesses is to fear too much to appear weak.
    • Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet, Politique Tirée de l'Écriture Sainte (Politics Drawn from the Very Words of Holy Scripture) (1679 - published 1709)
  • When I can read my title clear
    To mansions in the skies,
    I'll bid farewell to every fear,
    And wipe my weeping eyes.
    • Isaac Watts, Hymns and Spiritual Songs, Bk. II, hymn 65
  • No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.
    • Edmund Burke, A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1756)
  • The concessions of the weak are the concessions of fear.
    • Edmund Burke, Second Speech on Conciliation with America. The Thirteen Resolutions (March 22, 1775)
  • Fear is the foundation of most governments.
  • Like one that on a lonesome road
    Doth walk in fear and dread,
    And having once turned round walks on,
    And turns no more his head;
    Because he knows, a frightful fiend
    Doth close behind him tread.
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Part VI, st. 10 (1798)
  • Fair seedtime had my soul, and I grew up
    Fostered alike by beauty and by fear.
  • The surest way to prevent war is not to fear it.
    • John Randolph, Speech in the House of Representatives (March 5, 1806)
  • The only thing I am afraid of is fear.
  • They are slaves who fear to speak
    For the fallen and the weak.
  • Alike were they free from
    Fear, that reigns with the tyrant, and envy, the vice of republics.
  • One will rarely err if extreme actions be ascribed to vanity, ordinary actions to habit, and mean actions to fear.
  • * The broad effects which can be obtained by punishment in man and beast are the increase of fear, the sharpening of the sense of cunning, the mastery of the desires; so it is that punishment tames man, but does not make him "better."
  • Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear — not absence of fear.
  • Nothing so demoralizes the forces of the soul as fear. Only as we realize the presence of the Lord does fear give place to faith.
    • Sarah Smiley, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 243.
  • It is only the fear of God that can deliver us from the fear of man.
    • John Witherspoon, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 243.
  • There is a virtuous fear, which is the effect of faith; and there is a vicious fear, which is the product of doubt. The former leads to hope, as relying on God, in whom we believe; the latter inclines to despair, as not relying on God, in whom we do not believe. Persons of the one character fear to lose God; persons of the other character fear to find Him.
    • Blaise Pascal, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 244.
  • He has but one great fear that fears to do wrong.
    • Christian Nestell Bovee, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 244.
  • The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.
  • Courage is the price that life exacts for granting peace.
    The soul that knows it not, know no release
    From little things;
    Knows not the livid loneliness of fear,
    Nor mountain heights where bitter joy can hear
    The sound of wings.
  • To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead.
  • The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.
  • We look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms. The first is freedom of speech and expression — everywhere in the world. The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way — everywhere in the world. The third is freedom from want...everywhere in the world. The fourth is freedom from fear...anywhere in the world.
  • I am a member of a party of one, and I live in an age of fear. Nothing lately has unsettled my party and raised my fears so much as your editorial, on Thanksgiving Day, suggesting that employees should be required to state their beliefs in order to hold their jobs. The idea is inconsistent with our constitutional theory and has been stubbornly opposed by watchful men since the early days of the Republic.
    • E. B. White, Letter to the New York Herald Tribune (November 29, 1947)
  • Fear was my father, Father Fear.
    His look drained the stones.
  • Fear is the main source of superstition, and one of the main sources of cruelty. To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom.
  • There is a mental fear, which provokes others of us to see the images of witches in a neighbor’s yard and stampedes us to burn down this house. And there is a creeping fear of doubt, doubt of what we have been taught, of the validity of so many things we had long since taken for granted to be durable and unchanging. It has become more difficult than ever to distinguish black from white, good from evil, right from wrong.
  • It is when power is wedded to chronic fear that it becomes formidable.
  • We will not be driven by fear into an age of unreason if we...remember that we are not descended from fearful men, not from men who feared to write, to speak, to associate and to defend causes which were, for the moment unpopular.
  • You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along."...You must do the thing you think you cannot do.
  • Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate.
  • I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.
  • Fear is an emotion that makes us blind. How many things are we afraid of? We're afraid to turn off the lights when our hands are wet. We're afraid to stick a knife into the toaster to get the stuck English muffin without unpluggin it first. We're afraid of what the doctor may tell us when the physical exam is over; when the airplane suddenly takes a great unearthly lurch in midair. We're afraid that the oil may run out, that the good air will run out, the good water, the good life. When the daughter promised to be in by eleven and it's now quarter past twelve and sleet is spatting against the window like dry sand, we sit and pretend to watch Johnny Carson and look occasionally at the mute telephone and we feel the emotion that makes us blind, the emotion that makes a stealthy ruin of the thinking process.
  • Fear makes us blind, and we touch each fear with all the avid curiousity of self-interest, trying to make a whole out of a hundred parts, like the blind men with their elephant. We sense the shape. Children grasp it easily, forget it, and relearn it as adults. The shape is there, and most of us come to realize what it is sooner or later: it is the shape of a body under a sheet. All our fears add up to one great fear, all our fears are part of that great fear - an arm, a leg, a finger, an ear. We're afraid of the body under the sheet. It's our body. And the great appeal of horror fiction through the ages is that it serves as a rehearsal for our own deaths.
  • Quite an experience, to live in fear, isn't it? That's what it is to be a slave.
  • The only thing you fear is fearlessness.
    The bigger the weapon, the greater the fear.
  • Is it that they fear the pain of death, or could it be they fear the joy of life?
  • To use fear as the friend it is, we must retrain and reprogram ourselves...We must persistently and convincingly tell ourselves that the fear is here--with its gift of energy and heightened awareness--so we can do our best and learn the most in the new situation.
    • Peter McWilliams, Life 101 (1995)
  • Fear. Fear attracts the fearful. The strong. The weak. The innocent. The corrupt. Fear. Fear is my ally.
    • Darth Maul, promotional clip for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999)
  • Fear is the path to the Dark Side. Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering.
    • Yoda in Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999)
  • Let fear propel you forward. Do not let failure stifle you.
  • I don't know about angels, but it's fear that gives men wings.
  • I must say a word about fear. It is life's only true opponent. Only fear can defeat life. It is a clever, treacherous adversary, how well I know. It has no decency, respects no law or convention, shows no mercy. It goes for your weakest spot, which it finds with unerring ease. It begins in your mind, always. One moment you are feeling calm, self-possessed, happy. Then fear, disguised in the garb of mild- mannered doubt, slips into your mind like a spy. Doubt meets disbelief and disbelief tries to push it out. But disbelief is a poorly armed foot soldier. Doubt does away with it with little trouble. You become anxious. Reason comes to do battle for you. You are reassured. Reason is fully equipped with the latest weapons technology. But, to your amazement, despite superior tactics and a number of undeniable victories, reason is laid low. You feel yourself weakening, wavering. Your anxiety becomes dread. Fear next turns fully to your body, which is already aware that something terribly wrong is going on. Already your lungs have flown away like a bird and your guts have slithered away like a snake. Now your tongue drops dead like an opossum, while your jaw begins to gallop on the spot. Your ears go deaf. Your muscles begin to shiver as if they had malaria and your knees to shake as though they were dancing. Your heart strains too hard, while your sphincter relaxes too much. And so with the rest of your body. Every part of you, in the manner most suited to it, falls apart. Only your eyes work well. They always pay proper attention to fear.
    Quickly you make rash decisions. You dismiss your last allies: hope and trust. There, you've defeated yourself. Fear, which is but an impression, has triumphed over you. The matter is difficult to put into words. For fear, real fear, such as shakes you to your foundation, such as you feel when you are brought face to face with your mortal end, nestles in your memory like a gangrene: it seeks to rot everything, even the words with which to speak of it. So you must fight hard to express it. You must fight hard to shine the light of words upon it. Because if you don't, if your fear becomes a wordless darkness that you avoid, perhaps even manage to forget, you open yourself to further attacks of fear because you never truly fought the opponent who defeated you
  • Even the fear of death is nothing compared to the fear of not having lived authentically and fully.
    • Frances Moore Lappé, O Magazine, (May 2004)
  • I've grown certain that the root of all fear is that we've been forced to deny who we are.
    • Frances Moore Lappé, O Magazine, (May 2004)
  • Far too many people have been swept into the post-9/11 system of fear that is the basis of all public policy these days.
  • Take the so-called politics of fear — the constant reference to risks, from hoodies on the street corner to international terrorism. Whatever the truth of these risks and the best ways of dealing with them, the politics of fear plays on an assumption that people cannot bear the uncertainties associated with them. Politics then becomes a question of who can better deliver an illusion of control.
  • Où serait le mérite, si les héros n’avaient jamais peur?
    • Where would be the merit if heroes were never afraid?
    • Alphonse Daudet, Tartarin de Tarascon (1872); French cited from Tartarin de Tarascon (Paris: E. Flammarion, 1887), p. 204; translation from the Webster's French Thesaurus edition (San Diego: Icon, 2008), p. 80.

Unsourced

  • A timid person is frightened before a danger, a coward during the time, and a courageous person afterward.
    • Johann Paul Friedrich Richter
  • A wise man does not fear, a man afraid does not think.
    • Warhammer 40.000 Soulstorm, Space Marines Campain
  • All who love life, fear the reaper.
    • Eldar Dark Reaper, Warhammer 40k: Dawn of War: Dark Crusade
  • Fear ensures loyalty!
    • Commissar, Warhammer 40k: Dawn of War: Dark Crusade
  • Fear is that little darkroom where negatives are developed.
    • Michael Pritchard
  • I do not fear death. Death fears ME!
    • Shas'o Sa'cea Dre'koran Ta'ar, replying to the Space Marine ultimatum on Nimbosa.
  • I fear no evil, for I am fear incarnate!
    • Force Commander, Warhammer 40k: Dawn of War
  • Let the fear of danger be a spur to prevent it; he that fears not, gives advantage to the danger.
  • None but a coward dares to boast that he has never known fear.
  • Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate, Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.
  • Some people are afraid of heights. I'm afraid of widths.
  • Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.
  • The most drastic and usually the most effective remedy for fear is direct action.
    • William Burnham
  • The only real prison is fear, and the only real freedom is freedom from fear.
  • There is nothing to fear; if aggression is the result of fear, then fear is the fear of aggression. So if you are afraid of an aggressor, you are afraid of a thing which is afraid of you, a person ruled by his fear. And why should you be afraid of someone who is behaving like a small child in the darkness?
  • Though I walk in the Valley of The Shadow of The Daemon, I shall know no fear, For I am what the Daemon fears.
    • Grand master Mandulis of the Grey Knights
  • Where fear is present, wisdom cannot be.
    • Lactantius
  • You can discover what your enemy fears most by observing the means he uses to frighten you.
  • We must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings great ruin.
  • Fear... Fear is my ally
    • Darth Maul
  • Fear only loneliness, for when we are alone things become much scarier.
    • Shane O'Neill
  • Fear is the lengthened shadow of ignorance.
    • Arnold H. Glasgow
  • Fear is good. It keeps you from becoming a crappy doctor.

External links

Wikipedia
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Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Fear
disambiguation
This is a disambiguation page, which lists works which share the same title. If an article link referred you here, please consider editing it to point directly to the intended page.


Fear may refer to:

  • Fear, a poem by Sara Teasdale.
  • Fear, a short story by Achmed Abdullah.

Simple English

Fear is an emotion similar to anxiety. A person who fears something does not want it to happen, because they think something bad will happen to them if it does. Fear is the body's way of protecting itself from possibly dangerous situations. For example, if one has a fear of jumping off the cliff, he/she will not do it. This actually saves one from death. In this case, fear is a good thing but in others, it can be bad. An example of fear being bad is if it prevents one from doing something important like going to see a doctor.









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