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The term "'federalist'" describes several political beliefs around the world. It also has reference to the concept of federalism or the type of government called a federation.

Contents

Latin America

In Latin America the term "federalist" is used in reference to the politics of nineteenth-century Argentina and Colombia. The Federalists opposed the Unitarianists in Argentina and Centralists in Colombia in the early 1800s. In the Argentine case, many Federalists were provincianos, that is, Argentines who were from outside of Buenos Aires Province and citizens of the interior of Argentina. The gaucho armies of the interior fought for decades to maintain federalism. Federalists fought for complete self-government, as opposed to the centralized government that the Unitarianists and Centralists favored. The self-government that the Federalists fought for was basically a call for "virtual autonomy" in each province. Furthermore, Federalists demanded tariff protection for their recently acquired industries and called for the end of Buenos Aires as the intermediary center of trade.

General José de San Martín feared the Federalists. San Martín, as well as some Criollos, endorsed a plan for a constitutional monarchy. He believed that federalism meant a loss of order: "It would mean the certain destruction of Argentine unity, the dismemberment of the country into regional governments, and the emergence of a society dominated by the hydra-headed Gaucho tyrants of the interior plains." After 1817 San Martín's campaigns would take him away from Argentina, so he only had an indirect influence on further developments.

In 1819, the Gaucho armies, who wanted a federation and regional autonomy, threatened attack on Buenos Aires after Juan Martín de Pueyrredón, the director of the government in Buenos Aires, resigned. At the Battle of Cepeda in 1820, the Federalists forces defeated the Unitarianists, led by General José Rondeau, the Supreme Director of the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata. After the defeat, months of anarchy followed. Later, the Unitarianists were forced to sign a treaty with other provinces, which, nevertheless, failed to solve the conflict between the Unitarianists and the Federalists. Juan Manuel de Rosas, head of a group of Gaucho Federalists, defeated General Juan Lavalle in 1829 and took over Buenos Aires Province. Lavalle was forced into exile and Rosas was elected to office by the legislature later that year. To counteract these developments the Liga Unitaria was created by General José María Paz in 1829 in order to defeat the Federalists. The Gaucho Federalists faced Paz and his troops on May 31, 1831, and the Unitarianists were defeated after the Gauchos captured the Paz.

In 1859, Buenos Aires was forced to accept the federal constitution of 1853 after six years of secession. This was because on October 23, the commander of the Buenos Aires army, Bartolomé Mitre, was defeated at Cepeda by the Argentine Confederation, led by Justo José de Urquiza. However, the federal constitution was “amended to allow Buenos Aires greater influence.” The Battle of Pavón in 1861 ended the period of “armed strife.”

Is also known as a person that supports Federalism.

Quebec

Federalist, in regard to the National Question, defends the concept of Quebec remaining within Canada, while either keeping the status quo or pursuing greater autonomy and constitutional recognition of a Quebec nation, with corresponding rights and powers for Quebec within the Canadian federation. This ideology is opposed to Quebec sovereigntism, proponents of Quebec independence, most often (but not for all followers) along with an economic union with Canada similar to the European Union.

The United States

In the United States the term federalist usually applies to a member of one of the following groups:

Historic

Contemporary

In reference to the historical political party and as defined by Merriam-Webster, a federalist is "a member of a major political party in the early years of the United States favoring a strong centralized national government" [1].

The Federalist Society for Law & Public Policy Studies is an organization of conservative and libertarian lawyers and others dedicated to debate of these principles.

The World Federalist Movement. "World federalists support the creation of democratic global structures accountable to the citizens of the world and call for the division of international authority among separate agencies."

See also

References

  1. ^ http://m-w.com/dictionary/federalist.

External links


Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010
(Redirected to The Federalist Papers article)

From Wikisource

The Federalist Papers
Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison
The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. They were first published serially in New York City newspapers. A compilation, called The Federalist, was published in 1788. The Federalist Papers serve as a primary source for interpretation of the Constitution, as they outline the philosophy and motivation of the proposed system of government.— Excerpted from Federalist Papers on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Page scans are available.
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The Federalist Papers

  • Federalist No. 1 - General Introduction
  • Federalist No. 2 - Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
  • Federalist No. 3 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
  • Federalist No. 4 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
  • Federalist No. 5 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
  • Federalist No. 6 - Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States
  • Federalist No. 7 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States
  • Federalist No. 8 - The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States
  • Federalist No. 9 - The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection
  • Federalist No. 10 - The Same Subject Continued: The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection
  • Federalist No. 11 - The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy
  • Federalist No. 12 - The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue
  • Federalist No. 13 - Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government
  • Federalist No. 14 - Objections to the Proposed Constitution From Extent of Territory Answered
  • Federalist No. 15 - The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
  • Federalist No. 16 - The Same Subject Continued: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
  • Federalist No. 17 - The Same Subject Continued: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
  • Federalist No. 18 - The Same Subject Continued: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
  • Federalist No. 19 - The Same Subject Continued: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
  • Federalist No. 20 - The Same Subject Continued: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
  • Federalist No. 21 - Other Defects of the Present Confederation
  • Federalist No. 22 - The Same Subject Continued: Other Defects of the Present Confederation
  • Federalist No. 23 - The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union
  • Federalist No. 24 - The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered
  • Federalist No. 25 - The Same Subject Continued: The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered
  • Federalist No. 26 - The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered
  • Federalist No. 27 - The Same Subject Continued: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered
  • Federalist No. 28 - The Same Subject Continued: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered
  • Federalist No. 29 - Concerning the Militia
  • Federalist No. 30 - Concerning the General Power of Taxation
  • Federalist No. 31 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
  • Federalist No. 32 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
  • Federalist No. 33 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
  • Federalist No. 34 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
  • Federalist No. 35 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
  • Federalist No. 36 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
  • Federalist No. 37 - Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government
  • Federalist No. 38 - The Same Subject Continued, and the Incoherence of the Objections to the New Plan Exposed
  • Federalist No. 39 - The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles
  • Federalist No. 40 - The Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained
  • Federalist No. 41 - General View of the Powers Conferred by the Constitution
  • Federalist No. 42 - The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered
  • Federalist No. 43 - The Same Subject Continued: The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered
  • Federalist No. 44 - Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States
  • Federalist No. 45 - The Alleged Danger From the Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered
  • Federalist No. 46 - The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared
  • Federalist No. 47 - The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts
  • Federalist No. 48 - These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other
  • Federalist No. 49 - Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government
  • Federalist No. 50 - Periodic Appeals to the People Considered
  • Federalist No. 51 - The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments
  • Federalist No. 52 - The House of Representatives
  • Federalist No. 53 - The Same Subject Continued: The House of Representatives
  • Federalist No. 54 - The Apportionment of Members Among the States
  • Federalist No. 55 - The Total Number of the House of Representatives
  • Federalist No. 56 - The Same Subject Continued: The Total Number of the House of Representatives
  • Federalist No. 57 - The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many
  • Federalist No. 58 - Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered
  • Federalist No. 59 - Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
  • Federalist No. 60 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
  • Federalist No. 61 - The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
  • Federalist No. 62 - The Senate
  • Federalist No. 63 - The Senate Continued
  • Federalist No. 64 - The Powers of the Senate
  • Federalist No. 65 - The Powers of the Senate Continued
  • Federalist No. 66 - Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered
  • Federalist No. 67 - The Executive Department
  • Federalist No. 68 - The Mode of Electing the President
  • Federalist No. 69 - The Real Character of the Executive
  • Federalist No. 70 - The Executive Department Further Considered
  • Federalist No. 71 - The Duration in Office of the Executive
  • Federalist No. 72 - The Same Subject Continued, and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered
  • Federalist No. 73 - The Provision For The Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power
  • Federalist No. 74 - The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Executive
  • Federalist No. 75 - The Treaty Making Power of the Executive
  • Federalist No. 76 - The Appointing Power of the Executive
  • Federalist No. 77 - The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered
  • Federalist No. 78 - The Judiciary Department
  • Federalist No. 79 - The Judiciary Continued
  • Federalist No. 80 - The Powers of the Judiciary
  • Federalist No. 81 - The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority
  • Federalist No. 82 - The Judiciary Continued
  • Federalist No. 83 - The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury
  • Federalist No. 84 - Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered
  • Federalist No. 85 - Concluding Remarks
PD-icon.svg This work published before January 1, 1923 is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.







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